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Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

After they had plundered the houses, robbed the henroosts, and carried off every thing which was valuable, they burned the houses, amounting in all to upwards of two hundred, and then commenced a general distruction of the timber on the land. Some tracts, that were well timbered, were soon stripped of every tree. Such of the farms as they did not occupy, they took all the railes from them, and used them for their own purposes. There were several of thousands acres of land thus seazed on which improvements were made to a considerable extent, and the owners utterly forbid to enjoy them, and they have been compelled to sell them, for no valuable consideration, and this , usurpers, are now enjoying them.
While these brutalities were going on, the publick papers were constantly imployed in giving publicity to the foulest lies that could be created,
While this mob was engaged in their course of plunder— for is was altogether a plundering and robbing business, there were outrages of the most extraordinary character committed by them ever committed by human beings The plans they laid in order to plunder were of the most extraordinary kind. They serve writs on those whom they wanted to plunder [p. 5[a]]
After they had robbed<plundered> the houses, robbed the  henroosts, and carried <off> every thing which was valuable,  they burned the houses, amounting in all to upwards  of two hundred, and then commenced a general  distruction of the timber on the land. Some  tracts, that were well timbered, was <were> soon stripped  of every tree. Such of the farms as they did not  occupy, they took all the railes off of <from> them, and  used them for their own purposes. There were  a number <several> of thousands acres of land thus seazed  on which improvements were made to a conside rable extent, and the owners utterly forbid to enjo y them, and the<y> owners have been compelled to sell  them, for no valuable consideration, and this  banditta of ruffians, <usurpers>, are those now enjoying  them.
While these brutalities were going on, the  publick papers were constantly imployed in giving  publicity to the foulest lies that could be made <created,>  and in this foul business, the religious papers  generally in the country was <were> imployed, and dilli gently engaged. It was no uncommon thing  to hear a <the> peachers and other of the different  denominations, using all their influence  to justify these barbarities  or at best, to conceel the real facts from  those over whom he could have  influence over the view of the world.
While this mob was e[n]gaged in their cou rs[e] of plunder— for is was altogether a plunder ing and robbing business, there were outrages of  the most extraordinary business character commi tted by them to ever committed by human beings  The plans they laid in order to plunder were of  the most extraordinary kind. They swear <serve> of out some  a w[r]its against <on> those whom the[y] wanted to plunder [p. 5[a]]
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Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), ca. Sept. 1838–ca. Oct. 1839; handwriting of Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

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, George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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, David Lewis

10 Apr. 1814–2 Sept. 1855. Cooper, farmer, photographer. Born in Warren Co. (later in Simpson Co.), Kentucky. Son of Neriah Lewis and Mary Morse. Married Duritha Trail, 23 Nov. 1834. Baptized into LDS church, 24 Mar. 1835. Ordained an elder, 1835. Moved to...

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, and two unidentified scribes; sixty-four leaves, forty-nine pages of text with fifteen blank pages; JS Collection, CHL.

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