53992967

Times and Seasons, 1 March 1842

duct was truly heroic. When my life was sought at Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
, and my brethren in prison had great anxiety on my account, she interceded with my pursuers, who were nearly thirty in number, and actually convinced them that I was another person, altogether, and the pursuit was stopped. She, afterwards, in company with her brother, left her home in Iowa Territory

Area originally part of Louisiana Purchase, 1803. First permanent white settlements established, ca. 1833. Organized as territory, 1838, containing all of present-day Iowa, much of present-day Minnesota, and parts of North and South Dakota. Population in ...

More Info
, together with her tender offspring, and traveled a distance of nearly two hundred miles on horseback, to assist in the deliverance of her companion, or devise means whereby he and his brethren might make their escape from Prison; which thing was effected, and she left among a savage horde to suffer such abuses as they saw fit to inflict upon her, but through the goodness of God she was delivered from their hands and returned in peace to the bosom of her family and friends. Much might be said of the character of our deceased friend, but our paper will not permit us to be lengthy in our eulogies on the dead. We have penned the above acts to be handed down to future generations as a memorial of her, for her faith, her patience, and her integrity to her friends and her religion.
HEBER C. KIMBALL

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

View Full Bio
.
 
————
For the Times and Seasons.
THE COMING OF CHRIST.
The coming of Christ is a subject that the ancients have contemplated with great emotion; Isaiah having a view of this event, realized a portion of its benefit for says he, “Unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful Counsellor, the mighty God, the everlasting Father, the Prince of Peace: Of the increase of his government and peace there shall be no end.—” Jeremiah gazing upon the unparalleled blessings that should accrue to the human family through the incarnation of the son of God, breaks forth in rapturous accents and exclaims, “This is his name whereby he shall be called, The Lord our righteousness.” David looking down the stream of time, got his eye upon this noble event; and feeling its benefit applied to his heart, tunes the lyre and in seraphic notes he chants his praise. Moses beheld the coming of Christ, and saw a striking similarity, and said unto his people, “A prophet shall the Lord your God raise up unto you of your brethren, like unto me.” Abraham by faith beheld the son of God vailed in human form, and rejoiced to see it. In the fulness of time Christ came, and then every symbol was abolished by its representative; every shadow is lost in its respective substance—every prediction meets with its fulfilment.—And hecatombs no longer struggle upon the Jewish altars, while yielding their blood, as a type of better things.
Now the long, long looked for period at last arrives; and the auspicious morn, is hailed by a countless throng of angels, one of which announces to the watching shepherd, “Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.—” A star appeared in the east, and its meaning was understood by the Magi, who prosecuted their journey over dreary mountains, sandy deserts, and barren plains, in pursuit of the new born king; till at length coming to Bethlehem, “entering the house they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts, gold, and frankincense, and myrrh.” In this kind act they acknowledged this infant Prophet, Priest and King.—Simeon was a man who waited for the consolation of Israel: “and it was revealed unto him by the Holy Ghost, that he should not see death, before he had seen the Lord, Christ:” And beholding that promise fulfilled—“took the child in his arms,” and in a poetical strain uttered words of prayer and praise.—“Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word: For mine eyes have seen thy salvation, which thou has prepared before the face of all people; a light to lighten the Gentiles, and the glory of thy people Israel.” There was one Philip who desired to see the days of the son of man, who after he had seen Jesus came to Nathanael and said unto him, “We have found him, of whom Moses in the Law, and the Prophet did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph.” Now we see him passing through the world as a “man of sorrows and acquainted with grief.—” His journey was that of benevolence, and his labour that of love: until he offered himself a vicarious sacrifice—was numbered with [p. 714]
duct was truly heroic. When my life  was sought at Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
, and my breth ren in prison had great anxiety on my  account, she interceded with my pursuers,  who were nearly thirty in number, and  actually convinced them that I was anoth er person, altogether, and the pursuit was  stopped. She, afterwards, in company  with her brother, left her home in Iowa  Territory

Area originally part of Louisiana Purchase, 1803. First permanent white settlements established, ca. 1833. Organized as territory, 1838, containing all of present-day Iowa, much of present-day Minnesota, and parts of North and South Dakota. Population in ...

More Info
, together with her tender off spring, and traveled a distance of nearly  two hundred miles on horseback, to assist  in the deliverance of her companion, or  devise means whereby he and his breth ren might make their escape from Prison;  which thing was effected, and she left  among a savage horde to suffer such  abuses as they saw fit to inflict upon her,  but through the goodness of God she was  delivered from their hands and returned  in peace to the bosom of her family and  friends. Much might be said of the char acter of our deceased friend, but our pa per will not permit us to be lengthy in  our eulogies on the dead. We have pen ned the above acts to be handed down to  future generations as a memorial of her,  for her faith, her patience, and her in tegrity to her friends and her religion.
HEBER C. KIMBALL

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

View Full Bio
.
 
————
For the Times and Seasons.
THE COMING OF CHRIST.
The coming of Christ is a subject that  the ancients have contemplated with great  emotion; Isaiah having a view of this  event, realized a portion of its benefit  for says he, “Unto us a child is born,  unto us a son is given: and the govern ment shall be upon his shoulder: and his  name shall be called Wonderful Coun sellor, the mighty God, the everlasting  Father, the Prince of Peace: Of the in crease of his government and peace there  shall be no end.—” Jeremiah gazing  upon the unparalleled blessings that should  accrue to the human family through the  incarnation of the son of God, breaks  forth in rapturous accents and exclaims,  “This is his name whereby he shall be  called, The Lord our righteousness.”  David looking down the stream of time,  got his eye upon this noble event; and  feeling its benefit applied to his heart,  tunes the lyre and in seraphic notes he  chants his praise. Moses beheld the  coming of Christ, and saw a striking sim ilarity, and said unto his people, “A proph et shall the Lord your God raise up unto  you of your brethren, like unto me.”  Abraham by faith beheld the son of God  vailed in human form, and rejoiced to see  it. In the fulness of time Christ came,  and then every symbol was abolished by  its representative; every shadow is lost  in its respective substance—every pre diction meets with its fulfilment.—And  hecatombs no longer struggle upon the  Jewish altars, while yielding their blood,  as a type of better things.
Now the long, long looked for period  at last arrives; and the auspicious morn,  is hailed by a countless throng of angels,  one of which announces to the watching  shepherd, “Fear not: for, behold, I bring  you good tidings of great joy, which shall  be to all people. For unto you is born  this day in the city of David a Saviour,  which is Christ the Lord.—” A star ap peared in the east, and its meaning was  understood by the Magi, who prosecuted  their journey over dreary mountains,  sandy deserts, and barren plains, in pur suit of the new born king; till at length  coming to Bethlehem, “entering the house  they saw the young child with Mary his  mother, and fell down, and worshipped  him: and when they had opened their  treasures, they presented unto him gifts,  gold, and frankincense, and myrrh.”  In this kind act they acknowledged this  infant Prophet, Priest and King.—Simeon  was a man who waited for the consolation  of Israel: “and it was revealed unto him  by the Holy Ghost, that he should not see  death, before he had seen the Lord,  Christ:” And beholding that promise  fulfilled—“took the child in his arms,”  and in a poetical strain uttered words of  prayer and praise.—“Lord, now lettest  thou thy servant depart in peace, accor ding to thy word: For mine eyes have  seen thy salvation, which thou has pre pared before the face of all people; a  light to lighten the Gentiles, and the glo ry of thy people Israel.” There was  one Philip who desired to see the days of  the son of man, who after he had seen  Jesus came to Nathanael and said unto  him, “We have found him, of whom  Moses in the Law, and the Prophet did  write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Jo seph.” Now we see him passing through  the world as a “man of sorrows and ac quainted with grief.—” His journey  was that of benevolence, and his labour  that of love: until he offered himself a vi carious sacrifice—was numbered with [p. 714]
PreviousNext
Times and Seasons (Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, IL), 1 Mar. 1842, vol. 3, no. 9, pp. 703–718.

Facts