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Times and Seasons, 15 March 1842

a thousand fold in giving, for it receives life instead of existence. What? wouldest thou be the only one that takes but gives not? Shall the great stream of blessing end in thee? Wouldest thou have this stream of blessing lost in thy dry sand, and not restore to the ocean what it receives from it? Oh, hast thou duly considered that thou art nothing, if thou art only for thyself? Thou art something when thou art something for another; thou hast nothing as long as thou hast it only for thyself; thou possessest it only as thou hast it for another. The penny that thou hoardest is not thine; it is thine only when thou spendest it in blessing; and then, when thou hast once tasted the bliss of giving; the bliss of feeding the hungry, of clothing the naked, of comforting the sick, of rejoicing the miserable, of caring for the destitute; then canst thou rejoice in the high calling with which God has called thee; to be a blessing with all thou hast, then wilt thou readily give all thou hast to purchase a moment of such bliss. Why should God give thee more than is absolutely necessary for thee, but that he may make thee a distributor of his blessings to others, and wilt thou grasp with thine hand that which is not thine own? Our wise men have, therefore named this active benevolence in giving with the lovely name of [4 Hebrew characters: ZDQH] (i. e. righteousness,) for tsaadekau is essential righteousness, which gives to every thing that which God requires of it; and as tsaadekau, when applied to God, denotes his charitable righteousness, which gives to man, not that which he deserves, but that which he can bear; so, when applied to man it denotes that charitable righteousness which makes the love of God, rather than the right of another, the ground of assisting him.”
On alms giving he says, “there are eight degrees in alms giving:
1st The highest and first is, to assist the impoverished by gifts, loans, or providing them with employment so that they may become able to take care of themselves and have no need to beg.
2d. It is a less degree to give to the poor in such a way that the giver knows who receives his bounty, and the receiver does not know from whom the bounty comes. Giving to public charities when it is known that those charities are managed with wisdom and honesty comes very near this degree of alms giving.
3d. It is still less when the giver knows to whom he gives, and the receiver, from whom the bounty comes.
4th. It is still less when the poor knows who gives, but the giver knows not who receives.
5th. It is still less to give to the poor without being asked
6th. Still less when asked to give what is necessary.
7th. Still less to give what is necessary in a kind manner.
8th. The least of all is to give in an unkind manner.
Charity that sheweth itself in action, is more, incomparably more than giving money. Money is an external thing, but in this thou layest out that which is most noble, that which is the best thou hast.—Thy understanding, thy word, thy deed, thy ability, all that thou art as an offering on the altar of God, for the welfare of the brethren. In almsgiving we give that from which blessings may spring; but in this we make the plant of blessing to grow and blossom; we create the health, the joy, the peace, the prosperity, the welfare of our neighbor. If we would see a man who is like unto our heavenly Father, so let us behold one, who full of love, full of the divine will, himself prepares bread for the hungry, becomes a father to the orphans, for whom he cares, whom he educates; visits the sick, clothes the naked, comforts the suffering, buries the dead, advises the inexperienced, reconciles the contending, and every where labours in word and deed, to relieve every pain, to heal every sorrow, and dry every tear. And when such an example has excited us, and we feel that we are called to such blessedness, so step forward, let us devote ourselves, in the presence of God, with every noble faculty he has given us, to such acts of love, for the welfare of his children.—-[Jewish Intelligencer.
 
————
[Symbol of pointing hand.] In the last number I gave a brief history of the rise and progress of the Church, I now enter more particularly into that history, and extract from my journal.
JOSEPH SMITH.
HISTORY OF JOSEPH SMITH.
Owing to the many reports which have been put in circulation by evil designing persons in relation to the rise and progress of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, all of which have been [p. 726]
a thousand fold in giving, for it receives  life instead of existence. What? would est thou be the only one that takes but  gives not? Shall the great stream of bles sing end in thee? Wouldest thou have  this stream of blessing lost in thy dry  sand, and not restore to the ocean what it  receives from it? Oh, hast thou duly  considered that thou art nothing, if thou  art only for thyself? Thou art something  when thou art something for another;  thou hast nothing as long as thou hast it  only for thyself; thou possessest it only  as thou hast it for another. The penny  that thou hoardest is not thine; it is thine  only when thou spendest it in blessing;  and then, when thou hast once tasted the  bliss of giving; the bliss of feeding the  hungry, of clothing the naked, of com forting the sick, of rejoicing the misera ble, of caring for the destitute; then canst  thou rejoice in the high calling with which  God has called thee; to be a blessing with  all thou hast, then wilt thou readily give  all thou hast to purchase a moment of  such bliss. Why should God give thee  more than is absolutely necessary for  thee, but that he may make thee a distri butor of his blessings to others, and wilt  thou grasp with thine hand that which is  not thine own? Our wise men have,  therefore named this active benevolence in  giving with the lovely name of [4 Hebrew characters: ZDQH]  (i. e. righteousness,) for tsaadekau is  essential righteousness, which gives to  every thing that which God requires of it;  and as tsaadekau, when applied to God,  denotes his charitable righteousness,  which gives to man, not that which he de serves, but that which he can bear; so,  when applied to man it denotes that chari table righteousness which makes the love  of God, rather than the right of another,  the ground of assisting him.”
On alms giving he says, “there are  eight degrees in alms giving:
1st The highest and first is, to assist  the impoverished by gifts, loans, or pro viding them with employment so that  they may become able to take care of  themselves and have no need to beg.
2d. It is a less degree to give to the  poor in such a way that the giver knows  who receives his bounty, and the receiver  does not know from whom the bounty  comes. Giving to public charities when  it is known that those charities are man aged with wisdom and honesty comes very  near this degree of alms giving.
3d. It is still less when the giver knows  to whom he gives, and the receiver, from  whom the bounty comes.
4th. It is still less when the poor knows  who gives, but the giver knows not who  receives.
5th. It is still less to give to the poor  without being asked
6th. Still less when asked to give what  is necessary.
7th. Still less to give what is necessary  in a kind manner.
8th. The least of all is to give in an  unkind manner.
Charity that sheweth itself in action, is  more, incomparably more than giving  money. Money is an external thing, but  in this thou layest out that which is most  noble, that which is the best thou hast.— Thy understanding, thy word, thy deed,  thy ability, all that thou art as an offering  on the altar of God, for the welfare of the  brethren. In almsgiving we give that  from which blessings may spring; but in  this we make the plant of blessing to grow  and blossom; we create the health, the  joy, the peace, the prosperity, the welfare  of our neighbor. If we would see a man  who is like unto our heavenly Father, so  let us behold one, who full of love, full of  the divine will, himself prepares bread  for the hungry, becomes a father to the  orphans, for whom he cares, whom he  educates; visits the sick, clothes the na ked, comforts the suffering, buries the  dead, advises the inexperienced, recon ciles the contending, and every where  labours in word and deed, to relieve eve ry pain, to heal every sorrow, and dry  every tear. And when such an example  has excited us, and we feel that we are  called to such blessedness, so step for ward, let us devote ourselves, in the pres ence of God, with every noble faculty he  has given us, to such acts of love, for the  welfare of his children.—-[Jewish Intelli gencer.
 
————
[Symbol of pointing hand.] In the last number I gave a brief history  of the rise and progress of the Church, I now  enter more particularly into that history, and  extract from my journal.
JOSEPH SMITH.
HISTORY OF JOSEPH SMITH.
Owing to the many reports which have  been put in circulation by evil designing  persons in relation to the rise and pro gress of the Church of Jesus Christ of  Latter-Day Saints, all of which have been [p. 726]
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Times and Seasons (Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, IL), 15 Mar. 1842, vol. 3, no. 10, pp. 719–734.

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