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William W. Phelps and Warren Parrish Copy of Abraham Manuscript, Summer–Fall 1835 [Abraham 1:1–2:18]

William W. Phelps and Warren Parrish Copy of Abraham Manuscript, Summer–Fall 1835 [Abraham 1:1–2:18]

Mahmackrah and the god of Koash and the god of Pharaoh King of Egypt, therefore they turned their hearts to the sacrafice of the heathens, in offering up their Children unto these dum Idols, and hearkened not unto my voice, but endeavoured to take away my life by the hand of the priest of Elkkener.
HThe priest of Elkkener was also the priest of Pharaoh, now at this time it was the custom of the priest of Pharaoh the King of Egypt to offer up upon the altar which was built in the land of chaldea for the offering unto these strange gods, both men women and children, and it came to pass, that the priest made an offering unto the god of Pharaoh, and also unto the god of Shagreel, even after the manner of the Egyptians.
(now the god of Shagreel was the Sun) even a thank offering of a child did the priest of Pharaoh offer upon the altar which stood by the hill called Potiphers hill at the head of the plain of Olishem.
Hnow this priest had offered upon this altar three Virgins at one time who were the daughters of Onitah, one of the royal descent directly from the loins of Ham; these Virgins were offered up because of their virtue, they would not bow down to worship gods of wood or of stone,
[p. 2]
Mahmackrah and the god of Koash  and the god of Pharaoh King of Egypt,  therefore they turned their hearts to the  sacrafice of the heathens, in offering up  their Children unto these dum Idols,  and hearkened not unto my voice,  but endeavoured to take away <my> life  by the hand of the priest of Elkkener.
HThe priest of Elkkener was also the pri est of Pharaoh, now at this time it was  the custom of the priest of Pharaoh the  King of Egypt to offer up upon the altar  which was built in the land of cha ldea for the offering unto these stran ge gods, both men women and chi ldren, and it came to pass, that the  priest made an offering unto the  god of Pharaoh, and also unto the god  of Shagreel, even after the manner  of the Egyptians.
(now the god of Shagreel was the  Sun) even a thank offering of a  child did the priest of Pharaoh  offer upon the altar which stood  by the hill called Potiphers hill at  the head of the plain of Olishem.
Hnow this priest had offered upon  this altar three Virgins at one time  who were the daughters of Onitah,  one of the royal descent directly fro[m]  the loins of Ham; these Virgins were  offered up because of their virtue,  they would not bow down to worsh ip gods of wood and <or of> stone,
[p. 2]
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Book of Abraham Manuscript, Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, OH, ca. summer–fall 1835; handwriting of William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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and Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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; ten pages; Book of Abraham Manuscripts, ca. 1837–1841, CHL.
Note: When an Egyptian hieratic character appears on the manuscript, it is represented by a stylized “H” in the transcript. The transcript of the Book of Abraham manuscript presented here is used with permission of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. It was published earlier, with some differences in style, in Brian M. Hauglid, A Textual History of the Book of Abraham: Manuscripts and Editions (Provo, UT: Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship, Brigham Young University, 2010), 60–61; 112–147.

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