43990773

History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

December 15 go on with your printing, and do what you can in righteousness to build up Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, but do not suffer yourselves to harbor the Idea that Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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will rise on the ruins of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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. It is the privilege of brethren emigrating from any quarter to come to this place, and it is not right to attempt to persuade those who desire it, to stop short.”
(the foregoing is an extract from my letter in reply).
The Twelve Apostles were in Council at Elder Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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’s.

16 December 1841 • Thursday

16 Thursday 16. William A. Wightman

12 Dec. 1807–Sept. 1842. Married Dolly Eaton, 31 Oct. 1832. Baptized into LDS church, by 1836. Ordained an elder, 27 Feb. 1836, in Geauga Co., Ohio. Laid out town of Ramus (later Webster), Hancock Co., Illinois, 1840. Served as bishop, 1841, in Ramus. Lived...

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of Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

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, delivered to President Joseph Smith, sole Trustee in Trust, the Deed for the unsold and bonded Lots of Land in the Town of Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

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, bearing date December 8. 1841. also the Plot of the “first addition to Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
”, and the notes which have been received of Individuals who have purchased lots, and the Bonds of William Miller, September 21. 1840, and of Ute Perkins

15 July 1761–11 Mar. 1844. Born at Anson Co. (later Lincoln Co.), North Carolina. Son of Robert Biggan Perkins and Elizabeth Lollar. Served in American Revolution, 1778–1779. Moved to what became Abbeville Co., South Carolina, 1779. Married Sarah (Sally) ...

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Novr. 26. 1840, and of William J. Perkins November 7. 1840, and of John F. Charles November 16. 1841, for lots of land adjoining Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

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, and which may hereafter be added to the Town Plats (a part of the land included in William Miller’s bond is included in the first addition to Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

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, and the notes were transferred to the sole trustee in trust, for the benefit of the whole Church by a vote of the Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

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Conference December 4 and 5. 1841) after applying sufficient of said property to liquidate the claims of those from whom the Town

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

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was purchased, and also paying two notes given by William Wightman

12 Dec. 1807–Sept. 1842. Married Dolly Eaton, 31 Oct. 1832. Baptized into LDS church, by 1836. Ordained an elder, 27 Feb. 1836, in Geauga Co., Ohio. Laid out town of Ramus (later Webster), Hancock Co., Illinois, 1840. Served as bishop, 1841, in Ramus. Lived...

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for money borrowed to pay for the above property, viz, To Lyman Prentice Prentis $11.45 and James Cummins $50.00 and some other small demands against said Wightman

12 Dec. 1807–Sept. 1842. Married Dolly Eaton, 31 Oct. 1832. Baptized into LDS church, by 1836. Ordained an elder, 27 Feb. 1836, in Geauga Co., Ohio. Laid out town of Ramus (later Webster), Hancock Co., Illinois, 1840. Served as bishop, 1841, in Ramus. Lived...

View Full Bio
which have been contracted for the benefit of the Church in Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
.

18 December 1841 • Saturday

18 Saturday 18. I attended the City Council, and stated circumstances which I had heard concerning Mobocracy from a person late from Macombe, and requested an ordinance passed so that persons ordering any person to leave their peaceable homes could be dealt with Rigorously. see addenda book page 45

19 December 1841 • Sunday

19 Sunday 19. The Twelve were in Council at Elder Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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’s in the morning. see Addenda Book page 45

20 December 1841 • Monday

20 Monday 20. I communicated to the Times and Seasons as follows.
“To my friends in Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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. The Gubernatorial Convention of the State of Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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have nominated Colonel Adam W. Snyder for Governor, and Colonel John Moore for Lieutenant Governor of the State of Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
— election to take place in August next. Colonel Moore, like Judge Douglass Stephen A. Douglas

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

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and Esqre. Calvin A. Warren

3 June 1807–22 Feb. 1881. Lawyer. Born in Elizabethtown, Essex Co., New York. Lived at Hamilton Co., Ohio, 1832. Moved to Batavia, Clermont Co., Ohio, by 1835. Married first Viola A. Morris, 25 May 1835, at Batavia. Moved to Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois, 1836...

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was an intimate friend of General John C. Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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long before that Gentleman became a Member of our Community; and General Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

View Full Bio
informs us that no men were more efficient in assisting him to procure our great chartered privileges than were Colonel Snyder, and Colonel Moore, They are sterling Men, and friends of equal rights.— opposed to the oppressor’s grasp, and the tyrant’s rod. With such men, at the head of our State Government we have nothing to fear— In the next Canvass we shall be influenced by no party consideration— and no Carthagenian coalescence or collusion, with our people will be suffered to affect, or operate against, General Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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or any other of our tried friends already semi-officially in the field; so the partizans in this County

Formed from Pike Co., 1825. Described in 1837 as predominantly prairie and “deficient in timber.” Early settlers came mainly from mid-Atlantic and southern states. Population in 1835 about 3,200; in 1840 about 9,900; and in 1844 at least 15,000. Carthage ...

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who expect to divide the friends of humanity and equal rights will find themselves mistaken— we care not a fig for Whig or Democrat: they are both [p. 1265]
<December 15> go on with your printing, and do what you can in righteousness to build up  Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, but do not suffer yourselves to harbor the Idea that Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
will rise  on the ruins of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
. It is the privilege of brethren emigrating from any  quarter to come to this place, and it is not right to attempt to persuade those  who desire it, to stop short.”
(the foregoing is an extract from my letter in reply).
The Twelve <Apostles> were in Council at Elder [Heber C.] Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

View Full Bio
’s.

16 December 1841 • Thursday

<16> Thursday 16. William [A.] Wightman

12 Dec. 1807–Sept. 1842. Married Dolly Eaton, 31 Oct. 1832. Baptized into LDS church, by 1836. Ordained an elder, 27 Feb. 1836, in Geauga Co., Ohio. Laid out town of Ramus (later Webster), Hancock Co., Illinois, 1840. Served as bishop, 1841, in Ramus. Lived...

View Full Bio
of Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
, delivered to President Joseph Smith,  sole Trustee in Trust, the Deed for the unsold and bonded Lots of Land in the  Town of Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
, bearing date December 8. 1841. also the Plot of the “first addition  to Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
”, and the notes which have been received of Individuals who have  purchased lots, and the Bonds of William Miller, September 21. 1840, and of  Ute Perkins

15 July 1761–11 Mar. 1844. Born at Anson Co. (later Lincoln Co.), North Carolina. Son of Robert Biggan Perkins and Elizabeth Lollar. Served in American Revolution, 1778–1779. Moved to what became Abbeville Co., South Carolina, 1779. Married Sarah (Sally) ...

View Full Bio
Novr. 26. 1840, and of William J. Perkins November 7. 1840, and of  John F. Charles November 16. 1841, for lots of land adjoining Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
, and which  may hereafter be added to the Town Plats (a part of the land included in  William Miller’s bond is included in the first addition to Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
, and the  notes were transferred to the sole trustee in trust, for the benefit of the whole  Church by a vote of the Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
Conference December 4 and 5. 1841) after  applying sufficient of said property to liquidate the claims of those from  whom the Town

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
was purchased, and also paying two notes given by  William Wightman

12 Dec. 1807–Sept. 1842. Married Dolly Eaton, 31 Oct. 1832. Baptized into LDS church, by 1836. Ordained an elder, 27 Feb. 1836, in Geauga Co., Ohio. Laid out town of Ramus (later Webster), Hancock Co., Illinois, 1840. Served as bishop, 1841, in Ramus. Lived...

View Full Bio
for money borrowed to pay for the above property, viz,  To Lyman Prentice [Prentis] $11.45 and James Cummins $50.00 and some other  small demands against said Wightman

12 Dec. 1807–Sept. 1842. Married Dolly Eaton, 31 Oct. 1832. Baptized into LDS church, by 1836. Ordained an elder, 27 Feb. 1836, in Geauga Co., Ohio. Laid out town of Ramus (later Webster), Hancock Co., Illinois, 1840. Served as bishop, 1841, in Ramus. Lived...

View Full Bio
which have been contracted  for the benefit of the Church in Ramus

Area settled, 1826. Founded by Latter-day Saints, 1839–1840, following exodus from Missouri. Town platted, Aug. 1840. Post office established, Sept. 1840. Incorporated as Macedonia, Mar. 1843. Renamed Webster, 23 July 1847. Population in 1845 about 380. Crooked...

More Info
.

18 December 1841 • Saturday

<18> Saturday 18. I attended the City Council, and stated circumstances  which I had heard concerning Mobocracy from a person late from Macombe,  and requested a<n ordinance passed> so that persons ordering any person to  leave their peaceable homes could be dealt with Rigorously. <see addenda book page 45>

19 December 1841 • Sunday

<19> Sunday 19. The Twelve were in Council at Elder <B[righam]> Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

View Full Bio
’s <in the morning>. <see Addenda Book page 45>

20 December 1841 • Monday

<20> Monday 20. I communicated to the Times and Seasons as follows.
“To my  friends in Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
. The Gubernatorial Convention of the State of Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
have  nominated Colonel Adam W. Snyder for Governor, and Colonel John Moore for  Lieutenant Governor of the State of Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
— election to take place in August  next. Colonel Moore, like Judge Douglass [Stephen A. Douglas]

23 Apr. 1813–3 June 1861. Lawyer, politician. Born at Brandon, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Stephen Arnold Douglass and Sarah Fisk. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, 1830. Moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., Illinois, 1833. Served as attorney general of Illinois...

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and Esqre. [Calvin A.] Warren

3 June 1807–22 Feb. 1881. Lawyer. Born in Elizabethtown, Essex Co., New York. Lived at Hamilton Co., Ohio, 1832. Moved to Batavia, Clermont Co., Ohio, by 1835. Married first Viola A. Morris, 25 May 1835, at Batavia. Moved to Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois, 1836...

View Full Bio
was an intimate friend  of General [John C.] Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

View Full Bio
long before that Gentleman became a Member of our Community;  and General Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

View Full Bio
informs us that no men were more efficient in assisting him  to procure our great chartered privileges than were Colonel Snyder, and Colonel Moore,  They are sterling Men, and friends of equal rights.— opposed to the oppressor’s grasp,  and the tyrant’s rod. With such men, at the head of our State Government we  have nothing to fear— In the next Canvass we shall be influenced by no party  consideration— and no Carthagenian coalescence or collusion, with our people  will be suffered to affect, or operate against, General Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

View Full Bio
or any other of  our tried friends already semi-officially in the field; so the partizans in this  County

Formed from Pike Co., 1825. Described in 1837 as predominantly prairie and “deficient in timber.” Early settlers came mainly from mid-Atlantic and southern states. Population in 1835 about 3,200; in 1840 about 9,900; and in 1844 at least 15,000. Carthage ...

More Info
who expect to divide the friends of humanity and equal rights will find  themselves mistaken— we care not a fig for Whig or Democrat: they are both [p. 1265]
PreviousNext
This document, volume C-1, is the third of six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over an eighteen-year span from 1838 to 1856 and covers the period from 23 December 1805 to 8 August 1844. The narrative in this volume commences on 2 November 1838 with JS and other church leaders being held prisoner by the “Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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’s forces” at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri, and concludes with the death of Bishop Vinson Knight

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

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at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, on 31 July 1842. For a more complete discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to this history.
Volume C-1 was created beginning on or just after 24 February 1845 and its narrative completed on 3 May although work continued on the volume through 3 July of that year (Richards, Journal, 24 and 28 Feb. 1845; Historian’s Office, Journal, 3 May 1845; 3 and 4 July 1845). It is in the handwriting of Thomas Bullock and contains 512 pages of primary text, plus 24 pages of addenda. Additional addenda for this volume were created at a later date in a separate volume, and will appear in this collection as a separate document. Compilers Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock drew heavily from JS’s letters, discourses, and diary entries; meeting minutes; church and other periodicals and journals; and reminiscences, recollections, and letters of church members and other contacts. At JS’s behest, they had maintained the first-person, chronological-narrative format established in previous volumes, as if JS were the author. Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others reviewed and modified the manuscript prior to its eventual publication in the Salt Lake City newspaper Deseret News.
The historical narrative recorded in volume C-1 continued the account of JS’s life as prophet and president of the church. Critical events occurring within the forty-five-month period of this volume include the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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Mormon War; subsequent legal trials of church leaders; expulsion of the Saints from Missouri; missionary efforts in England by the Twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

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and others; attempts by JS to obtain federal redress for the Missouri depredations; publication of the LDS Millennial Star in England; the migration of English converts to America; missionary efforts in other nations; the death of church patriarch Joseph Smith Sr.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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; the establishment of the Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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city charter; the commencement of construction of the Nauvoo temple

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

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; the Wisconsin “pinery”

Also known as pinery. Area near Black River where lumbering operation was established to provide timber for construction of Nauvoo temple, Nauvoo House, and other public buildings. Four mills established on Black River, ca. Sept. 1841: three near Black River...

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expedition that facilitated temple construction; the introduction of the doctrine of proxy baptism for deceased persons; the dedicatory prayer by Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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on the Mount of Olives in Palestine; publication of the “Book of Abraham” in the Nauvoo Times and Seasons; publication of the JS history often referred to as the “Wentworth letter;” the organization of the Female Relief Society of Nauvoo; and the inception of Nauvoo-era temple endowment ceremonies.

Facts