53992091

Letter from James Adams, 4 January 1840

Springfield

Settled by 1819. Incorporated as town, 1832. Became state capital, 1837. Incorporated as city, 1840. Sangamon Co. seat. Population in 1840 about 2,600. Stake of LDS church organized in Springfield, Nov. 1840; discontinued May 1841; branch organized, Jan. ...

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4th. Jany 1840
Respected Sir
I had the gratification of the receipt of yours of the 16th Decr; which gave me pleasure to learn that your prospects were at that early period, in a measure flattering— I also saw yours of the 19th Dec. to Mr Webers.—
We are now consulting and feeling the pulsations relative to your case— being brought before the Legislature now in session by [way] of resolutions instructing our Senators; and requesting our Representatives to urge relief in your case; what will be done yet remains uncertain; still it is my strongest impression, it will be found prudent to get the matter before our Legislature for their action thereon—
I am happy to learn that all our delegation are friendly to your intended application for relief in some shape, and it strikes me, that the views of the President at this period may be the best and perhaps the only way that relief could at this time be obtained; and in that event be no injury to a future application to be restored to all your rights, when prejudice shall in a measure have subsided, and the true state of the matter be more readily received even by those whose prejudices, may have closed the avenues to reason and Justice in a matter identified with the odium so commonly attached to the sound of mormonism
This odium will naturally wear off, when [p. 95]
Springfield

Settled by 1819. Incorporated as town, 1832. Became state capital, 1837. Incorporated as city, 1840. Sangamon Co. seat. Population in 1840 about 2,600. Stake of LDS church organized in Springfield, Nov. 1840; discontinued May 1841; branch organized, Jan. ...

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4th. Jany 1840
Respected Sir
I had the gratification of the receipt  of yours of the 16th Decr; which gave me pleasure to learn  that your prospects were at that early period, in a  measure flattering— I also <saw> yours of the 19th Dec. to  Mr Webers.
We are now consulting and feeling the  pulsations relative to your case— being brought  before the Legislature now in session by [way] of  resolutions instructing our Senators; and requesting  our Representatives to urge relief in your case;  what will be done yet remains uncertain;  still it is my strongest impression, it will be  found prudent <to> get the matter before our Legislature  for their action thereon—
I am happy to learn that all our  delegation are friendly to your intended app lication for relief in some shape, and it strikes  me, that the views of the President at this period  may be the best and perhaps the only way that  relief <could> at this time be obtained; and in that event  be no injury to a future application to be restored  to all your rights, when prejudice shall in a  measure have subsided, and the true state of the  matter be more readily received even by those whose  prejudices, may have closed the avenues to reason  and Justice in a matter identified with the odium  so commonly attached to the sound of mormonism
This odium will naturally wear off, when [p. 95]
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James Adams

24 Jan. 1783–11 Aug. 1843. Lawyer, judge, insurance agent, land speculator. Born at Simsbury, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Parmenio Adams and Chloe. In New York militia, served as ensign, 1805; as lieutenant; as captain, 1807, and as major, 1811–1815...

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, letter, Springfield

Settled by 1819. Incorporated as town, 1832. Became state capital, 1837. Incorporated as city, 1840. Sangamon Co. seat. Population in 1840 about 2,600. Stake of LDS church organized in Springfield, Nov. 1840; discontinued May 1841; branch organized, Jan. ...

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, IL, to JS, Washington DC

Created as district for seat of U.S. federal government by act of Congress, 1790, and named Washington DC, 1791. Named in honor of George Washington. Headquarters of executive, legislative, and judicial branches of U.S. government relocated to Washington ...

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, 4 Jan. 1840; handwriting of Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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; in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 95–96; JS Collection, CHL.

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