Project Team

EDITORIAL BOARD

Executive Director and Church Historian and Recorder

Assistant Executive Director

Assistant Church Historian and Recorder

Managing Director, Church History Department

Director, Publications Division, Church History Department

General Editor, Joseph Smith Papers

Series Editor, Legal and Business Records Series, Joseph Smith Papers

NATIONAL ADVISORY BOARD

Gouverneur Morris Professor Emeritus of History, Columbia University, and former Howard W. Hunter Chair of Mormon Studies, Claremont Graduate University

James A. Bostwick Chair and Professor of Literature and Religion, University of Richmond

Founder and Former General Editor, Joseph Smith Papers

Distinguished Professor in the Humanities, Danforth Center on Religion and Politics, Washington University

Program Director, Documents Compass, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, University of Virginia

Chancellor’s Professor, Emeritus, of Religious Studies and Adjunct Professor of American History and American Studies, Indiana University, Bloomington

Jonathan Edwards Professor of American Religious History and Chair, Department of Religious Studies, Yale University

EDITORIAL BOARD BIOGRAPHIES

Elder Steven E. Snow Steven E. Snow

was named a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in March 2001. He is currently serving as executive director of the Church History Department and as church historian and recorder. Elder Snow served as a member of the Presidency of the Seventy from 2007 to 2012. Before he was appointed to the Seventy, Elder Snow was a senior partner in the Utah law firm of Snow Nuffer. Elder Snow has been actively involved in the support of education, having served as a member and president of his local school board, chairman of the Utah State Board of Regents, and chairman of the Western States Commission of Higher Education. He was appointed a member of the President’s Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships in 2012. He earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Utah State University and a Juris Doctor from Brigham Young University. He chairs the editorial board of the Joseph Smith Papers.

James J. Hamula

Elder James J. Hamula was named a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on April 5, 2008. Currently, Elder Hamula is assistant executive director of the Church History Department. Elder Hamula received a bachelor of arts degree, magna cum laude, in political science and philosophy from Brigham Young University in 1981. In 1985, he received both a master of arts in political philosophy and a juris doctorate from Brigham Young University. From 1985 until his appointment to the Seventy, Elder Hamula practiced law. He is a member of the editorial board of the Joseph Smith Papers.

Richard E. Turley Jr.

was appointed assistant church historian and recorder for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 12 March 2008. Prior to this appointment, he served as managing director of the Family and Church History Department, four years as managing director of the Family History Department, and fourteen years as managing director of the Church Historical Department. His book Victims: The LDS Church and the Mark Hofmann Case (University of Illinois Press, 1992) is an oft-cited history of the famous Hofmann forgery-murder case of the 1980s. He serves as a member of the editorial board for the Joseph Smith Papers, and as general editor of the Journals of George Q. Cannon. He is the coauthor, with Ronald W. Walker and Glen M. Leonard, of Massacre at Mountain Meadows, published in 2008 by Oxford University Press. He coedited the second volume in the Revelations and Translations series of The Joseph Smith Papers (published 2011).

Reid L. Neilson

is managing director of the Church History Department. He received his BA in international relations from Brigham Young University in 1996. After graduation he worked for Arthur Andersen’s Strategy, Finance, and Economics Division in Los Angeles and London, consulted for Walt Disney’s Strategic Planning Division in Tokyo, and researched for the University of Michigan Business School’s Asia-Pacific Human Resources Partnership in Hong Kong. He also took graduate degrees in American history and business administration at BYU in 2001 and 2002, respectively. In 2006 he completed his PhD in religious studies (American religious history emphasis) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was named an International Studies Scholar for Tomorrow Fellow. He began his academic career as an assistant professor of LDS church history and doctrine at BYU before joining the Church History Department in 2009. Dr. Neilson is the author of several books and the editor or coeditor of over a dozen volumes. He is a member of the editorial board of the Joseph Smith Papers.

Matthew J. Grow

is director of publications at the Church History Department. He is a general editor and a member of the editorial board of the Joseph Smith Papers. He was previously an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for Communal Studies at the University of Southern Indiana. He is the author of “Liberty to the Downtrodden”: Thomas L. Kane, Romantic Reformer (Yale University Press, 2009), winner of the 2010 Best Book Award from the Mormon History Association and of the 2011 Evans Biography Award; and coauthor, with Terryl Givens, of Parley P. Pratt: The Apostle Paul of Mormonism (Oxford University Press, 2011). He has published articles in Journal of the Early Republic, Church History, American Nineteenth-Century History, Journal of Mormon History, BYU Studies, and Utah Historical Quarterly. He received his PhD in American history from the University of Notre Dame in 2006.

Ronald K. Esplin

is a general editor, along with Matthew J. Grow, of the Joseph Smith Papers, and is a member of the editorial board. He served as the project’s managing editor until 2012. He received history degrees from the University of Utah, the University of Virginia, and Brigham Young University. From 1972 until 1980, he was part of the History Division of the Historical Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, with assignments both as a researcher and writer and as an archivist. He moved to Brigham Young University in 1980 when the History Division was transferred there to become the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Latter-day Saint History. From 1986 through 2002, he served as managing director of that research institute and as a professor of church history and doctrine. From 1988 to 1991, he served as one of the editors for Macmillan’s Encyclopedia of Mormonism. Most of his publications have involved Brigham Young and early Utah or pre-Utah Mormon history, including Men with a Mission: The Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the British Isles, 1837–1841. Many of them also concern Joseph Smith and early Latter-day Saint leadership. He served as president of the Mormon History Association from 2006 to 2007.

Jeffrey N. Walker

is the series manager and coeditor of the Legal and Business Records series of The Joseph Smith Papers, and is a member of the editorial board. He served as associate managing editor of the Papers until 2012. He completed a BS from Western Michigan University and a JD from the J. Reuben Clark Law School, Brigham Young University, where he was an editor for the Brigham Young University Law Review. He currently serves as adjunct professor at the J. Reuben Clark Law School. He has been in private practice since 1988 and has developed various businesses, including a manufacturing company and national watch company. He has written and spoken widely on Joseph Smith’s legal affairs and is currently preparing a multivolume work on Oliver Cowdery’s legal practice. He is a trustee and treasurer for the Mormon Historic Sites Foundation and the managing editor of Mormon Historical Studies.

NATIONAL ADVISORY BOARD BIOGRAPHIES

Richard Lyman Bushman,

a member of the National Advisory Board of the Joseph Smith Papers, served as a general editor of the Papers from the project's founding until 2013. He is Gouverneur Morris Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University and former Howard W. Hunter Chair of Mormon Studies at Claremont Graduate University. He received his BA and PhD degrees from Harvard University. He taught at Brigham Young University, Boston University, and the University of Delaware before joining the Columbia faculty. His published works include From Puritan to Yankee: Character and the Social Order in Connecticut, 1690–1765 (1967), King and People in Provincial Massachusetts (1985), and The Refinement of America: Persons, Houses, Cities (1992). He has served as president of the Mormon History Association and the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic. His books on Mormon themes include Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling (2005), Joseph Smith and the Beginnings of Mormonism (1984), and Believing History (2004).

Terryl L. Givens,

a member of the Joseph Smith Papers National Advisory Board, is James A. Bostwick Chair and Professor of Literature and Religion at the University of Richmond. He received a BA in comparative literature from Brigham Young University and an MA and PhD in comparative literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Among his religious studies work are several titles with Oxford University Press. His works include The Viper on the Hearth: Mormons, Myths and the Construction of Heresy; By the Hand of the Mormon: The American Scripture That Launched a New World Religion; and People of Paradox: A History of Mormon Culture. His latest book is When Souls Had Wings: Pre-Mortal Existence in Western Thought (Oxford, 2009). He has also published essays in Romanticism, literary theory, and cultural studies.

Dean C. Jessee

is a founder of the Joseph Smith Papers and a member of the National Advisory Board. He served as a general editor of the Papers from the project's founding until 2013. He received an MA degree in LDS church history from Brigham Young University. His career includes working for the Archives and the History Division of the Historical Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1964 to 1981, followed by nineteen years’ service at the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Latter-day Saint History at Brigham Young University. His years of gathering and publishing Joseph Smith documents laid the groundwork for the current Joseph Smith Papers. His publications include Personal Writings of Joseph Smith (1984, 2001); Papers of Joseph Smith, vols. 1 and 2 (1989, 1991); Brigham Young’s Letters to His Sons (1974); and numerous articles dealing with aspects of nineteenth-century Mormon history. He is a past president of the Mormon History Association.

Laurie Maffly-Kipp,

a member of the National Advisory Board of the Joseph Smith Papers, is a distinguished professor in the humanities at the Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis. She received her BA from Amherst College in English and religion and completed a PhD in American history at Yale University. She taught previously at Amherst College, Yale University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she chaired the Religious Studies Department for five years. Her research and teaching focus on Mormonism, African American religions, religion on the Pacific borderlands of the Americas, and issues of intercultural contact. The recipient of numerous fellowships and grants and the editor or author of many books and articles, she has most recently published Setting Down the Sacred Past: African-American Race Histories (Harvard University Press, 2010); American Scriptures, a Penguin Classics anthology of sacred texts (2010); and Women’s Work, a coedited collection of writings by African American women historians (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Susan Holbrook Perdue,

a member of the Joseph Smith Papers National Advisory Board, is program director of Documents Compass, a newly created service that provides digital tools and methods to documentary editors. She is the current president of the Association for Documentary Editing. She was senior associate editor of The Papers of Thomas Jefferson: Retirement Series, associate editor of The Papers of John Marshall, and research and editorial assistant for The Papers of James Madison. She is the coeditor with Mary-Jo Kline of the third edition of A Guide to Documentary Editing.

Stephen J. Stein,

a member of the National Advisory Board of the Joseph Smith Papers, is Chancellor’s Professor, Emeritus, of Religious Studies and Adjunct Professor of American History and American Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington. He holds a PhD degree from Yale University. He joined the faculty of Indiana University in 1970. Among his extensive writings are books dealing with Jonathan Edwards, alternative religions, and apocalypticism. He is the editor of three volumes in the Yale University Press edition of The Works of Jonathan Edwards, The Cambridge Companion to Jonathan Edwards, and the third volume of The Encyclopedia of Apocalypticism. He is the author of The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers and Communities of Dissent: A History of Alternative Religions in America. He is currently serving as the general editor of the projected three-volume The Cambridge History of Religions in America.

Harry S. Stout,

a member of the Joseph Smith Papers National Advisory Board, is Jonathan Edwards Professor of American Religious History at Yale University and Chair, Department of Religious Studies. He received a BA degree from Calvin College, after which he studied at Princeton Theological Seminary and University. He holds MA and PhD degrees from Kent State University. He taught at the University of Connecticut before joining the faculty at Yale in 1986. From 1991 until the present, he has served as the general editor, The Works of Jonathan Edwards, and general editor, Religion in America, a series with more than 30 books published to date. Among his published works, which include books, articles, review essays, and book reviews, are Jonathan Edwards at 300: Essays on the Tercentenary of His Birth (coedited with Kenneth Minkema and Caleb Maskell), the award-winning Upon the Altar of the Nation: A Moral History of the Civil War, and Stories of Faith, Stories of America: Religion in United States History (with Randall Balmer and Grant Wacker).

CONTRIBUTOR BIOGRAPHIES

Mark Ashurst-McGee

is a specialist in document analysis and documentary editing methodology. He holds a PhD in history from Arizona State University and has trained at the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents. He coedited volume one of the Journals series of The Joseph Smith Papers (published 2008) and volume one of the Histories series (2012). He is the author of peer-reviewed articles on Joseph Smith and early Mormon history.

Alexander L. Baugh

serves as coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers. A professor of LDS church history and doctrine at Brigham Young University, he received a BS from Utah State University and holds MA and PhD degrees from BYU. His career has included work as an instructor and director for the LDS Church Educational System. He is the author or editor of five books on early Mormon history. His published articles have appeared in BYU Studies, the John Whitmer Historical Association Journal, Mormon Historical Studies, the Ensign, The Religious Educator: Perspectives of the Restored Gospel, and BYU Religious Education Review. He has also contributed numerous chapters in various books. Currently, he also serves as editor of Mormon Historical Studies. The recipient of awards from the Mormon History Association for his scholarly works, he is completing a book manuscript on the Haun’s Mill massacre that occurred in northern Missouri in 1838.

Jeffrey G. Cannon

is an associate archivist and associate web editor, overseeing transcription and document control for the Joseph Smith Papers. A graduate student in the Department of Church History and Church Polity at the University of Pretoria’s Faculty of Theology, he is currently writing a thesis on the role of religion in Afrikaner ethnic identity and the Afrikaner response to early Latter-day Saint proselytizing in the Cape Colony. His other research interests include the historical development of Mormon liturgy and ecclesiology and Catholic theology and culture. A graduate of Brigham Young University, he did his undergraduate work in political science and African studies while working as a teaching assistant in the Department of Political Science and a research assistant for the Joseph Smith Papers.

Joseph F. Darowski,

with the Joseph Smith Papers since 2002, is a historian and web editor. He holds a BS from Cornell and an MA in history from Brigham Young University and has done additional graduate work at the College of William and Mary. He earned a diploma from the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Previously, he was a developmental editor for college textbooks.

Kay Darowski

is an associate web editor for the Joseph Smith Papers. She has a BA in history, coursework completed for an MA in history at Brigham Young University, and a diploma from the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She has worked at Petersburg National Battlefield in Petersburg, Virginia, and the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia. She has been a developmental editor and copy editor for college history textbooks, as well as for other books and articles. Previous to her current responsibilities, she supervised a team of student research assistants for the project at Brigham Young University.

Gerrit J. Dirkmaat

is a coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He received his PhD from the University of Colorado, Boulder, in 2010 where he studied nineteenth-century American expansionism and foreign relations. His dissertation was titled “Enemies Foreign and Domestic: US Relations with Mormons in the US Empire in North America, 1844–1854.” He served as the senior assistant editor of Diplomatic History from 2003 to 2009.

Ben Godfrey

is the product manager for the Joseph Smith Papers. He is responsible for coordinating the development and content releases of the josephsmithpapers.org site. Prior to joining the Church History Department, he spent twenty years as a product manager and executive vice president of product development at several firms in the high-tech industry, including Apple. He spent several years managing international teams and development relationships in Europe and Asia. As a public speaker, he has spoken across the United States and internationally on topics such as how technology can improve education, government, and public safety. He holds a bachelor’s degree in communication, with an emphasis on new technology, from Utah State University.

Matthew C. Godfrey

is managing historian of the Joseph Smith Papers and coeditor of volumes in the Documents series. He holds a PhD in American and public history from Washington State University. Before joining the project, he worked for eight years at Historical Research Associates, a historical and archeological consulting firm headquartered in Missoula, Montana, serving as president of the company from 2008 to 2010. He is the author of Religion, Politics, and Sugar: The Mormon Church, the Federal Government, and the Utah-Idaho Sugar Company, 1907-1921 (2007), which was a co-winner of the Mormon History Association’s Smith-Petit Award for Best First Book. He has also published articles in Agricultural History and Pacific Northwest Quarterly and has presented papers at conferences of the Mormon History Association, the National Council on Public History, the American Society for Environmental History, and the Western History Association, among other organizations.

David W. Grua

is a coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He holds a PhD in American history from Texas Christian University and a BA and an MA in American history from Brigham Young University. He has published scholarly articles on Mormon and Native American history in the Western Historical Quarterly, the Journal of Mormon History, Federal History, and other peer reviewed journals and edited volumes. In addition, he has presented papers at the annual conferences of the Western History Association, the Mormon History Association, and other professional venues. Before joining the Papers, he worked as a historian for the Church History Museum. As a student at BYU, he was a research assistant for the Papers, where he contributed to the first and second volumes of the Journals series.

Steven C. Harper

is a historian for the Church History Department who serves on the Joseph Smith Papers as coeditor of volumes in the Documents series. He was coeditor of volume one of the Revelations and Translations series (published 2009). He taught LDS church history and doctrine at BYU from 2002 to 2012 and history and religion at BYU–Hawaii from 2000 to 2001. He earned his PhD in early American history from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. He received research fellowships from the Quaker Collection at Haverford College, the Lawrence Henry Gipson Institute for Eighteenth-Century Studies, and the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Latter-day Saint History. He is the author of Joseph Smith’s First Vision: A Guide to the Historical Accounts (2012), Making Sense of the Doctrine and Covenants (2008), and Promised Land: Penn’s Holy Experiment, the Walking Purchase, and the Dispossession of Delawares 1600–1763 (2006), and has published articles on early Mormonism and the early American republic in Religion and American Culture, Journal of the Early Republic, the Journal of Mormon History, and Mormon Historical Studies. Two of these were awarded the T. Edgar Lyon and Juanita Brooks awards by the Mormon History Association.

William G. Hartley,

an associate professor of history, emeritus, at Brigham Young University, is coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He received BA and MA degrees in history from BYU and completed doctoral coursework at Washington State University. In 1972 he joined church historian Leonard Arrington’s staff of research historians, writing Latter-day Saint history full time and helping launch the department’s oral history program. In 1980, after the staff transferred to BYU to become the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Latter-day Saint History, he continued writing Mormon history and became an associate professor in the BYU History Department. His specialty areas include historical development of the priesthood, nineteenth-century Mormon emigration, and family biography writing. He has published sixteen books and more than one hundred articles in academic journals and church magazines and is the recipient of four best book awards and four best article awards from professional organizations. A past president of the Mormon History Association, he has served on editorial boards for the Journal of Mormon History and Mormon Historical Studies.

Andrew H. Hedges

is coeditor of volume 2 (published 2011) and volume 3 in the Journals series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He served as managing historian of the project from 2012 to 2013. He received a PhD in American history from the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, an MA in Near East studies from Brigham Young University, and a BS in zoology from Weber State College. He is currently an associate professor of LDS church history and doctrine at BYU. He has published a variety of articles on early Mormon history and edited several volumes of scholarly essays, including Disciple as Witness (2000) and Disciple as Scholar (2000).

Christian Heimburger

is coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He holds a BA in American studies from Brigham Young University and a PhD in modern American history from the University of Colorado, Boulder. His dissertation, titled “Beyond Barbed Wire: The Significance of Japanese American Labor in the Mountain West, 1942–1944,” explores the experiences of Japanese American laborers who temporarily left World War II incarceration camps to work in communities around the Mountain West. He previously worked as an adjunct professor at Utah Valley University, as a visiting scholar at Brigham Young University, and as an author and consultant for the Colorado History Education Initiative. He has presented research at conferences of the American Historical Association, Western History Association, and Association for Asian American Studies.

Stephanie Hengen

is an editorial assistant for The Church Historian’s Press. She helps with source checking and researching for the reference material. She graduated from Brigham Young University with a BA in English language and a minor in editing. She has been on the editorial staff of various university journals. During her free time, she works as a freelance editor and writer and as an acquisitions intern for literary agent Amy Jameson.

Sharalyn D. Howcroft

has been employed by the Church History Department since 2000 as an archivist and document specialist for the Joseph Smith Papers. She received a BA in English with a minor in Hebrew language from Brigham Young University. After finishing an intensive Hebrew program in the Middle East, she completed an intensive Arabic program that was part of a Middle Eastern languages consortium at the University of Utah. She received an MA in library and information science with an archival studies concentration from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.

Richard L. Jensen

is a senior writer, research historian, and review editor for the Joseph Smith Papers. He served as coeditor of volume one of the Journals series (published 2008) and is coeditor of volumes one and two in the Histories series (both published in 2012). He has an MA, history, The Ohio State University, and a BA, history, Utah State University. He is author, coauthor, coeditor, or translator of books and articles about the history of the Latter-day Saints. He has had a particular interest in Latter-day Saints in and from Europe, particularly in the nineteenth century. He joined the History Division of the Historical Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1972; was transferred in 1980 to Brigham Young University’s Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Latter-day Saint History, where he first became involved with the Joseph Smith Papers; and was transferred again in 2005 to the Church History Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He has served as book review editor for the Journal of Mormon History, member of the board of the John Whitmer Historical Association, and member of the council of the Mormon History Association (MHA). He was president of MHA from 2011 to 2012 and currently serves as secretary-treasurer of the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study.

Robin Scott Jensen

is the associate managing historian and project archivist for the Joseph Smith Papers and coedited the first two volumes in the Revelations and Translations series (published 2009 and 2011, respectively). He specializes in document and transcription analysis. In 2005 he earned an MA degree in American history from Brigham Young University, and in 2009 he earned a second MA in library and information science with an archival concentration from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. He is now pursuing a PhD in history at the University of Utah. He completed training at the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents in 2007. He has published several articles and edited documents and has presented papers at various scholarly conferences.

Shannon Kelly

is an associate editor for The Church Historian's Press. She previously worked as an editorial assistant for the Joseph Smith Papers. She received a BA in humanities with a minor in editing from Brigham Young University, where she wrote and edited for Stowaway magazine and served as an editorial assistant for BYU Studies.

Kelley Konzak

is an associate editor for The Church Historian's Press. A graduate of Brigham Young University with a BA in English language and a minor in editing, she previously worked as an editorial assistant at the Church History Library. She has also edited for the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship and for Cedar Fort Publishing and Media.

Elizabeth A. Kuehn

is coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of the Joseph Smith Papers. She earned a BA with honors in history and a classical language certificate from Arizona State University, and an MA in European and women’s history from Purdue University. She is currently a PhD candidate in early modern European history at the University of California, Irvine, and is working on her dissertation, which integrates Jewish and German religious history. Before joining the project, she was an instructor in the history department and religious studies program at the University of California, Irvine.

Riley M. Lorimer

is an associate editorial manager for the Joseph Smith Papers. She coedited the second volume in the Revelations and Translations series (published 2011). She received a BA in English with a minor in editing from Brigham Young University and an MA in English, with an emphasis in British literature, from the University of Utah. She has written and edited for the New Era, BYU Magazine, and other publications. Her research has focused on the literature and history of the Renaissance in Britain; she has served as secretary of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association (RMMRA) and has presented papers at conferences of the RMMRA and the Society for Reformation Studies, among others. In 2011, she completed training at the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents in Boston.

Gordon A. Madsen

serves the Joseph Smith Papers as senior coeditor of the Legal and Business Records series. He received BS and JD degrees from the University of Utah. He served as Utah deputy district attorney from 1957 to 1959 and as assistant attorney general, 1959–1964. He has been in private practice since 1964. His civic and professional contributions include being a member, Constitutional Revision Commission; member, Judicial Qualifications Commission; member, Judicial Nominating Commission (Third Judicial District); chairman, Eminent Domain Section and Legislative Section of Utah State Bar; and member, Utah House of Representatives, 1969–1971. Among his publications are “State Police Power Held to Override Bankruptcy Act in Financial Responsibility Case,” Personal Finance Law Quarterly 16.3 (Summer 1962): 97–100; “Joseph Smith’s 1826 Trial: The Legal Setting,” BYU Studies 30.2 (Spring 1990): 91–108; and “Joseph Smith and the Missouri Court of Inquiry,” BYU Studies 43.4 (2004): 93–136.

Jeffrey David Mahas

is a research assistant for the Joseph Smith Papers whose work will appear in the Documents and Administrative Records series. He received a BA in history from Brigham Young University and worked for two years as collections manager of the L. Tom Perry Special Collections at BYU.

Spencer W. McBride

is a coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He holds a BA in history from Brigham Young University–Hawaii (2007) and an MA and PhD (2010, 2014) in history from Louisiana State University. His research interests include the intersections of religion and politics in early America, and his dissertation, “The Pulpit and the Nation: Clergymen, Political Culture, and the Creation of an American National Identity,” examines the political activism of Protestant clergymen during the American Revolution and in the early American republic. He was previously the T. Harry Williams Fellow at Louisiana State University and served as the assistant book review editor for the Journal of the Early Republic.

Sharon E. Nielsen

is a web editor for the Joseph Smith Papers. Her primary assignment is preparing content for the project’s website. She received a BA in Near Eastern studies from Brigham Young University and an MA in ancient civilizations and biblical studies from the University of Michigan. Previously she worked as a manager of data collection for a Civil War research project directed by the Center for Population Economics, Chicago, and as an assistant editor for the Occasional Papers series at the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship, at Brigham Young University. She has also worked as an independent genealogist.

Rachel M. Osborne

is an associate editor and source checker for The Church Historian's Press, training and overseeing a team of source checkers. The recipient of a BA in English from Brigham Young University, she is currently pursuing an MA degree in history from the University of Utah. She formerly worked as an editorial assistant for BYU Studies.

Amanda Owens

is an editor for The Church Historian's Press. She received a BA in English literature and an MA in literature with emphases in linguistics and children’s literature from Arizona State University. While pursuing her graduate degree, she taught GRE prep classes and began her editing career working on content for websites, academic journals, and a travel and style magazine. She also freelanced as a book editor for several years. After graduating, she worked as an editor and project manager for an academic publishing company, producing online curriculum. In 2012, she completed training at the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents in Charlottesville, VA.

Alison Palmer

is an editor for The Church Historian's Press. She earned a BA degree in English with a minor in editing from Brigham Young University, where she worked as a writing tutor and as the producer of a university podcast. She also contributed research to BYU’s Victorian Short Fiction Project. After graduating, she completed an editorial internship with Covenant Communications and an editing internship in the Curriculum Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. After working as a writer for a marketing company, she joined the team of the Joseph Smith Papers in May 2010. She is currently pursuing a master's degree in rhetoric and composition from the University of Utah.

Max H Parkin

is coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He received a BS degree in business from the University of Utah, an MA from Brigham Young University in history and philosophy of religion, and a PhD from BYU in LDS church history and doctrine. His thesis and dissertation were on aspects of Latter-day Saint history in Kirtland, Ohio, and Missouri, respectively. Some of his writings include Conflict at Kirtland (1967), a history of the Latter-day Saints in Ohio; and Sacred Places—Missouri, a history of Mormon sites in Missouri and Kansas. He has published articles in the Encyclopedia of Mormonism, Historical Atlas of Mormonism, the Encyclopedia of LDS History, and Regional Studies in Church History—Missouri, as well as in LDS church magazines and professional journals. He authored a chapter in Restoration Movement, a history text for the Graceland College of the Community of Christ (formerly the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints). He served as a volunteer researcher in the Museum of Church History and Art, was a lecturer on Sea Trek 2001, and taught for the Church Educational System for fifty years (professionally for thirty-eight years and twelve years as a volunteer), principally at the Institute of Religion at the University of Utah.

Keaton Reed

is an editorial assistant for The Church Historian's Press. He helps research and source check reference material for the geographical and biographical directories. He received a BA in technical communication from Utah State University.

Brenden W. Rensink

is coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He holds a BA in history from Brigham Young University (2003) and an MA and PhD in history from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln (2006, 2010). A scholar of the North American West, transnational borderlands, indigenous North American history, and comparative genocide studies, he has published a number of articles, book chapters, and reviews in those fields. Currently, he has two manuscripts under revision for publication: Native but Foreign: Transnational Cree, Chippewa, and Yaqui Refugees and Immigrants in the U.S.-Canadian and U.S.-Mexican Borderlands, 1880–Present (Texas A&M Press) and Historical Dictionary of the Discovery and Exploration of the American Frontier (Scarecrow Press). He is active in the Western History Association and has presented research at its annual conferences, as well as at the Newberry Library in Chicago and other forums. Before joining the project, he was a visiting assistant professor of history at the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

Brent M. Rogers

is coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He received a BA with honors in history from San Diego State University, an MA in public history from California State University, Sacramento, and a PhD in nineteenth-century United States history from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. He previously served as a digital editor and research fellow for the Papers of William F. Cody and as an instructor in the history department at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. He has produced scholarship on digital history, history of the American West, and Mormon history.

Leslie Sherman

is an assistant editor and source checker for The Church Historian's Press. She earned a BA degree in English with a minor in editing from Brigham Young University, where she worked as an editorial staff member on a student journal and spent time as a research assistant. After graduating, she interned for the Daily Caller, a news website based in Washington DC.

Royal Skousen,

professor of linguistics and English language at Brigham Young University, has been the editor of the Book of Mormon Critical Text Project since 1988. In 2009, Skousen published with Yale University Press the culmination of his critical text work, The Book of Mormon: The Earliest Text. He is a volume coeditor for the Joseph Smith Papers, charged with the task of preparing, in collaboration with coeditor Robin Scott Jensen, the three volumes that will reproduce photographs and facsimile transcripts of the two manuscripts of the Book of Mormon. Skousen received his PhD in linguistics from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana in 1972. He has also taught at the University of Illinois, the University of Texas, the University of California at San Diego, and, as a Fulbright lecturer, at the University of Tampere in Finland. In 2001, he was a research fellow at the Max Planck Institute in the Netherlands. He is known for his work on exemplar-based theories of language and quantum computing of analogical modeling. His publications include three books on nonrule approaches to language description: Analogical Modeling of Language (1989), Analogy and Structure (1992), and Analogical Modeling: An Exemplar-Based Approach to Language (2002).

Alex D. Smith

is coeditor of volume two (published 2011) and volume three in the Journals series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He received MA (2002) and BA (1998) degrees in history from Brigham Young University and is currently pursuing a PhD in history from the University of Utah. He was a research historian and document editor with the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Latter-day Saint History, where he first began working for the Papers. His research interests and project specialization focus on the history of the church in Nauvoo. He also serves as a photographer for the Joseph Smith Papers.

R. Eric Smith

is editorial manager of the Joseph Smith Papers Project and of the Publications Division of the Church History Department. He has significant editing experience in early Mormon history and is the editor of numerous documents and other materials published in print or electronically. Before joining the Church History Department, he was an editor for the Curriculum Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for ten years. He formerly practiced law for a Salt Lake City firm. He received a BA degree in English from Brigham Young University and a JD from the University of Utah.

Grant Underwood

is coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers. He received his PhD from UCLA, his MA and BA degrees from Brigham Young University. He is a professor of history at BYU. He is author of the prize-winning Millenarian World of Early Mormonism (1993), editor of two volumes on LDS history in the Pacific (2000), and author of a number of articles on Mormon history.

Nathan N. Waite

is an associate editorial manager for the Joseph Smith Papers. He received a BA in English from Brigham Young University and an MA in American studies from the University of Utah; he has also completed training at the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents and the Digital Humanities Summer Institute. He has presented papers at conferences of the Mormon History Association and the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment, among others. He is coeditor of A Zion Canyon Reader (University of Utah Press, 2014) and has edited for BYU Magazine, the Liahona, and David R. Godine, Publisher.

John W. Welch

is a consulting scholar for the Joseph Smith Papers. He is the Robert K. Thomas Professor of Law at the J. Reuben Clark Law School, Brigham Young University, where he teaches nineteenth-century American legal history, biblical law, and various tax courses. He attended BYU (BA in history; MA in Latin and Greek), studied Greek philosophy at Oxford University, and received his law degree from Duke University, where he served as the articles editor for the Duke Law Journal. He practiced law in Los Angeles, where he organized the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies (FARMS). From 1988 to 1991 he served as one of the editors for Macmillan’s Encyclopedia of Mormonism, and since 1991 he has served as the editor-in-chief of BYU Studies, a role that included serving as publisher for the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Latter-day Saint History. He was one of the organizers of the bicentennial conference for Joseph Smith at the Library of Congress. For many years he has been the general editor of the Collected Works of Hugh Nibley. His publications include “Bible in American Law,” in Encyclopedia of American Civil Liberties (2006); The Worlds of Joseph Smith: A Bicentennial Conference at the Library of Congress (2006); Opening the Heavens (2005); the Journals of William E. McLellin (1994); and many other books and articles about Latter-day Saint scriptures.

Robert J. Woodford

is coeditor of volumes in the Documents series of The Joseph Smith Papers and coedited volume one of the Revelations and Translations series (published 2009). He holds a PhD degree from Brigham Young University in Bible and modern scripture and wrote the dissertation “The Historical Development of the Doctrine and Covenants.” He has taught the Doctrine and Covenants and LDS church history for over forty years, particularly at the Institute of Religion at the University of Utah, LDS Business College, and the Joseph Smith Academy at Nauvoo, Illinois. Concurrently, he taught at BYU Salt Lake Center for over twenty-five years and at the BYU Provo campus for two years. He has authored several articles for the Ensign, BYU Studies, and other publications.