30484

Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson County, Missouri, 10 August 1833

Kirtland Mills

Located in Newel K. Whitney store in northwest Kirtland on northeast corner of Chardon and Chillicothe roads. Whitney appointed postmaster, 29 Dec. 1826. JS and others listed “Kirtland Mills, Geauga County, Ohio” as return address for letters mailed, 1833...

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Ohio Aug. 10th 1833
Dear brethren William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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, Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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, Isaac Morley

11 Mar. 1786–24 June 1865. Farmer, cooper, merchant, postmaster. Born at Montague, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Thomas Morley and Editha (Edith) Marsh. Family affiliated with Presbyterian church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, before 1812. Married...

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, John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, & Sidney Gilbert

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

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, & all others who are willing to lay down their lives for the cause of our Lord Jesus Christ: I need not relate to you at this time the fatigues of my journey, nor the lonesome hours which I experienced while journeying, a stranger in a strange land, surrounded on the right & on the left by the destroying angels who were executing the will of the Lord in the consumation of the wicked, I have not doubted for a moment but that your prayers were ascending in my behalf; & so it is I am preserved. I did not arrive as soon as I had hoped, in consequence of being hindered three days since I left in waiting for a conveyance, I arrived yesterday afternoon. I will now proceed to give you some advice concerning your business & the advice may be relied upon. It is wisdom that you look out another place to locate on; be wise in your selection, & commence in the best situation you can find, is not the land before you? & an other place of beginning will be no injury to Zion in the end, & though you may be wearied, yet count it joy, for the Lord will reward you more than a hundred fold for all your sufferings in righteousness,— Make out your bill of damages immediately, if you have not, & get the pay; do not remove any faster to your new home than you bound yourselves to, but pray for the Lord to deliver, for this is his will that you should, & fear not for his arm will be revealed, & it will fall upon the wicked & they cannot escape.
For the comfort of those who offered their lives & made the compromise to remove, I just say that the Lord was well pleased with that act, that is, the agreement to remove, & there was no other way to save the lives of all the church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
in Zion, or the most: and any who are dissatisfied with that move, are not right & have cause to repent, & call upon the Lord for grace to support them in the moment of tribulation. This great tribulation would not have come upon Zion had it not been for rebelion: Firstly there were rebelions against the one to whom were intrusted the keys

Authority or knowledge of God given to mankind. In the earliest records, the term keys primarily referred to JS’s authority to unlock the “mysteries of the kingdom.” Early revelations declared that both JS and Oliver Cowdery held the keys to bring forth “...

View Glossary
, & from thence it has spread down to the lowest & least member! not this alone, but those who were void of understanding were continually telling that which was not true, & putting false coloring to the things of God! I mean those whose mouths are continually open, & whose tongues cannot be stayed from tatling! & the church will never have peace while such remain in her, therefore, brethren purge them out, & have no confidence in any except such as will lay down their lives for this sacred cause for none others are worthy of it. It was necessary that these things should come upon us: not only justice demands it, but there was no other way to cleanse the church. Fear not, brethren, the Lord is yet for you & though the heavens & the earth pass away, yet the elect [p. [1]]
Kirtland Mills

Located in Newel K. Whitney store in northwest Kirtland on northeast corner of Chardon and Chillicothe roads. Whitney appointed postmaster, 29 Dec. 1826. JS and others listed “Kirtland Mills, Geauga County, Ohio” as return address for letters mailed, 1833...

More Info
Ohio Aug. 10th 1833
Dear brethren W[illiam W. Phelps]

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
, J[ohn Whitmer]

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

View Full Bio
, E[dward Partridge]

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
, I[saac Morley]

11 Mar. 1786–24 June 1865. Farmer, cooper, merchant, postmaster. Born at Montague, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Thomas Morley and Editha (Edith) Marsh. Family affiliated with Presbyterian church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, before 1812. Married...

View Full Bio
, J[ohn Corrill]

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
, & S[idney Gilbert]

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

View Full Bio
, & all others who are willing to lay down their  lives for the cause of Christ our Lord Jesus Christ: I need not relate to you at this  time the fatigues of my journey, nor the lonesome hours which I experienced while  journeying, a stranger in a strange land, surrounded on the right & on the  left by the destroying angels who were executing the will of the Lord in the  consumation of the wicked, I have not doubted for a moment but that your  prayers <were> ascending in my behalf; & so it is I am preserved. I did not arri ve as soon as I had hoped, in consequence of being hindered three days  since I left in waiting for a conveyance, I arrived yesterday afternoon.  I will now proceed to give you some advice concerning your business & the  advice may be relied upon. It is wisdom that you look out another place to  locate on; be wise in your selection, & commence in the best situation you  can find, is not the land before you? & an other place of beginning will be no  injury to Zion in the end, & though you may be wearied, yet count it joy, for  the Lord will reward you more than a hundred fold for all your sufferings  in righteousness,— Make out your bill of damages immediately, if you  have not, & get the pay; do not remove any faster to your new home than  you bound yourselves to, but pray for the Lord to deliver, for this is his will  that you should, & fear not for his arm will be revealed, & it will fall upon the  wicked & they cannot escape.
For the comfort of those who offered their lives  & made the compromise to remove, I just say that the Lord was well  pleased with that act, that is, the agreement to remove, & there was  no other way to save the lives of all the church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
in Zion, or the most:  and any who are dissatisfied with that move, are not right & have cau se to repent, & call upon the Lord for grace to support them in the  moment of tribulation. This great tribulation would not have come  upon Zion had it not been for rebelion: Firstly there were rebelions  against the one to whom were intrusted the keys

Authority or knowledge of God given to mankind. In the earliest records, the term keys primarily referred to JS’s authority to unlock the “mysteries of the kingdom.” Early revelations declared that both JS and Oliver Cowdery held the keys to bring forth “...

View Glossary
, & from thence  it has spread down to the lowest & least member! not this alone,  but those who were void of understanding were continually telling  that which was not true, & putting false coloring to the things of  God! I mean those whose mouths are continually open, & whose  tongues cannot be stayed from tatling! & the church will never  have peace while such remain in her, therefore, brethren purge  them out, & have no confidence in any except such as will lay  down their lives for this sacred cause for none others are worthy  of it. It was necessary that these things should come upon  us: not only justice demands it, but there was no other way  to cleanse the church. Fear not, brethren, the Lord is yet for  you & though the heavens & the earth pass away, yet the elect [p. [1]]
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Tensions between local residents and church members in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, Missouri, peaked on 20 July 1833 when vigilantes destroyed the church’s printing office. Under threat of further conflict, church members in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, Missouri, signed an agreement on 23 July 1833 to move from the county “as soon as possible.” Dispatched to personally inform JS of the shocking developments, Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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arrived on 9 August in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, and one day later penned this letter to his brethren in Zion.
The letter’s tone, supportive and reassuring, conveyed the concern of the church’s presidency for the members in Zion, offering counsel and advice in light of the 23 July agreement. JS added a short postscript, expressing his own sympathy for the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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members in their sufferings. Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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sent this letter from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, to William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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and other leaders in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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. Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
made a copy after its arrival.

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