30495

Letter to Edward Partridge and Others, 10 December 1833

manifested, I am sensable that I aught not to murmer  and do not murmer only in this, but that those who are innocent  are compelled to suffer for the iniquities of the guilty;  and I cannot account for this, only on this wise, that  the saying of the savior has not been strictly observed:  If thy right eye offend thee pluck it out. and cast it  from thee <or if thy right arm offend thee pluck it of[f] and cast it from thee>. Now the fact is, if any of the members of our body  are disordered, the rest of our body will be effected with them  and then all is brought into bondage together. And yet  notwithstanding all this, it is with difficulty that I can  restrain my feelings; when I know that you my brethren  with whom I have had so many happy hours, sitting as  it were in heavenly places in Christ Jesus. and also have ing the witness which I feel, and even have felt, of the  purity of your motives— are cast out, and are as strangers  and pilgrims on the earth, exposed to hunger, cold,  nakedness peril, sword &c I say when I contemplate  this, it is with difficulty that I can keep from complaining  and murmerings against this dispensation; but I am  sensible that this is not right and may God grant  that notwithstanding your great afflictions and sufferings  there may not any thing sepperate us from the Love  of Christ. Brethren, when we learn your sufferings it  awakens evry sympathy of our hearts; it weighs us  us down; we cannot refrain from tears [illegible] yet we are  not able to realize only in part your sufferings. And I  often hear the brethren saying they wish they were with you  that they might bear a part of your sufferings; and I myself  should have been with you had not God prevented it in  the order of his providence, that the yoke of affliction might  be less grievous upon you; God having forewarned me  concerning these things for your sakes; and also bro Oliver [Cowdery]

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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,  could not lighten your afflictions by tarrying longer  with you, for his presence would have so much the  more enraged your enemies; therefore, God hath deals dealt  mercifully with us. O brethren, let us be thankful [p. 72]
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JS wrote this letter in response to dispatches just received from Bishop Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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, William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, and John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, all dated 19 November 1833, describing the church’s displacement in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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. JS expressed his feelings regarding the turn of events in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, Missouri; his interest in having an account written of Zion and its tribulation; his continuing commitment to build Zion; and his firm confidence in God.
JS wrote this letter from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, to Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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, Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, Sidney Gilbert

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

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, Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, Isaac Morley

11 Mar. 1786–24 June 1865. Farmer, cooper, merchant, postmaster. Born at Montague, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Thomas Morley and Editha (Edith) Marsh. Family affiliated with Presbyterian church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, before 1812. Married...

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, and members in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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. Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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copied the text into JS Letterbook 1.

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