2477114

Letter to Emma Smith, 13 October 1832

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Oct 13 1832 Pearl Street House

Also known as Merchants’ House. Four-story edifice with columned entrance and arched sign on roof. Located at 88 Pearl Street (oldest street in city). JS and Bishop Newel K. Whitney journeyed to New York City, fall 1832, and stayed at hotel. While at hotel...

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1

According to an October 1832 newspaper article, the Pearl Street House had existed for twenty-five years and was “extensively known as the resort of merchants from every part of the Union especially from the western part of the state of New York and from Ohio.” The hotel faced two parallel streets (Pearl and Water), stretching the entire distance between them. It included “four story buildings” as well as “a small court yard and a two story edifice, on the roof of which is a flower garden.” In the summer of 1832, the boarding house—which was “the largest commercial boarding house in the United States”— underwent extensive renovations, including the “erection of spacious additional buildings, containing several elegant dining rooms on the second floor, and ranges of sleeping rooms above.” It could accommodate up to three hundred boarders and was “kept by Messrs. Brown, of Clinton Co., and Mahon, late commander of the steamboat New Philadelphia, from whom every thing may be expected in the way of civility and attention.” (“Events of the Day &c.,” Evening Post [New York City], 26 Oct. 1832, [2].)  


N Y city

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

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My Dear Wife

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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This day I have been walking through the most splended part of the city of New York

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

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2

Lower Manhattan, where JS and Newel K. Whitney were staying, was the most developed part of New York City in 1832. (Buttenwieser, Manhattan Water-Bound, 41–42.)  


the buildings are truly great and wonderful to the astonishing of every beholder and the language of my heart is like this can the great God of all the Earth maker of all things magnificent and splended be displeased with man for all these great inventions saught out by them my answer is no it cannot be seeing these works are calculated to make men comfortable wise and happy therefore not for the works can the Lord be displeased only aganst man is the anger of the Lord kindled because they Give him not the Glory therefore their iniquities shall be visited upon their heads and their works shall be burned up with unquenchable fire the inequity iniquity of the people is printed in every countinance and nothing but the dress of the people makes them look fair and butiful all is deformity their is something in every countinance that is disagreable with few exceptions Oh how long Oh Lord Shall this order of things exist and darkness cover the Earth and gross darkness cover the people3

See Isaiah 60:2; see also Revelation, 22–23 Sept. 1832 [D&C 84:49].  


after beholding all that I had any desire to behold I returned to my room to meditate and calm my mind and behold the thaughts of home of Emma

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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and Julia M. Smith

30 Apr. 1831–12 Sept. 1880. Born in Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio. Daughter of John Murdock and Julia Clapp. After death of mother, adopted by JS and Emma Smith at age of nine days. Lived in Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co....

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rushes upon my mind like a flood and I could wish for [p. [1]]
Oct 12 <13> 1832 Pearl Street House

Also known as Merchants’ House. Four-story edifice with columned entrance and arched sign on roof. Located at 88 Pearl Street (oldest street in city). JS and Bishop Newel K. Whitney journeyed to New York City, fall 1832, and stayed at hotel. While at hotel...

More Info
1

According to an October 1832 newspaper article, the Pearl Street House had existed for twenty-five years and was “extensively known as the resort of merchants from every part of the Union especially from the western part of the state of New York and from Ohio.” The hotel faced two parallel streets (Pearl and Water), stretching the entire distance between them. It included “four story buildings” as well as “a small court yard and a two story edifice, on the roof of which is a flower garden.” In the summer of 1832, the boarding house—which was “the largest commercial boarding house in the United States”— underwent extensive renovations, including the “erection of spacious additional buildings, containing several elegant dining rooms on the second floor, and ranges of sleeping rooms above.” It could accommodate up to three hundred boarders and was “kept by Messrs. Brown, of Clinton Co., and Mahon, late commander of the steamboat New Philadelphia, from whom every thing may be expected in the way of civility and attention.” (“Events of the Day &c.,” Evening Post [New York City], 26 Oct. 1832, [2].)  


N Y <city>

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

More Info
My Dear Wife

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
This day I have been walking through the  most splended part of the city of New Y[ork]

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

More Info
2

Lower Manhattan, where JS and Newel K. Whitney were staying, was the most developed part of New York City in 1832. (Buttenwieser, Manhattan Water-Bound, 41–42.)  


 the buildings are truly great and wonderful  to the astonishing <of> to eve[r]y beholder and the lan guage of my heart is like this can the gre at God of all the Earth maker of all things  magnificent and splended be displeased with  man for all these great inventions saught  out by them my answer is no it cannot be  seeing these works are are calculated to mak[e]  men comfortable wise and happy therefore  not for the works can the Lord be displeased  only aganst man is the anger of the Lord  kindled because they Give him not the Glory  therefore their iniquities shall <be> visited upon  their heads and their works shall be burned up with  unquenchable fire the inequity [iniquity] of the people is pri nted in every countinance and nothing but the  dress of the people makes them look fair and  butiful all is deformity their is something in  every countinance that is disagreable with few  exceptions Oh how long Oh Lord Shall this  order of things exist and darkness cover the  Earth and gross darkness cover the people3

See Isaiah 60:2; see also Revelation, 22–23 Sept. 1832 [D&C 84:49].  


 after beholding all that I had any desire to  behold I returned to my room to meditate  and calm my mind and behold the thaughts  of home of Emma

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
and Julia [M. Smith]

30 Apr. 1831–12 Sept. 1880. Born in Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio. Daughter of John Murdock and Julia Clapp. After death of mother, adopted by JS and Emma Smith at age of nine days. Lived in Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co....

View Full Bio
rushes upon  my mind like a flood and I could wish for [p. [1]]
Next
JS, Letter, New York City

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

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, NY, to Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
, Kirtland Township

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, OH, 13 Oct. 1832; handwriting and signatures of JS; three pages; CCLA. Includes address, postal markings, dockets, and archival marking.
Two loose leaves, measuring 9¾ × 7¾ inches (25 × 20 cm). JS apparently folded the document to create a margin line prior to inscription. The document was folded with two tri-folds in letter style, addressed, and sealed with a red adhesive wafer. The postage rate was inscribed in a large and elaborate script in red ink. A circular date stamp was applied in red ink. Docket in handwriting of Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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reads: “Joseph Smith Jr | Oct 13th 1832 N. York

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

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”. The document was refolded, apparently at a later time, probably in connection with filing. Additional docket in unidentified handwriting reads: “J. Smith | Oct 13 1832”. The two leaves appear to have been sewn together at some point in time. Graphite pagination added on the recto pages of the two leaves suggests that at one time the letter was placed in an archival letter file or book. The document has undergone some conservation.
The document includes two autograph signatures. It was apparently received and kept by Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
. The presence of the Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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docket suggests that the letter was kept for a time in JS’s office in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois. The document was apparently returned to Emma Smith because it came into the possession of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (now Community of Christ). A late nineteenth-century printing of the letter in the periodical of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and late twentieth-century archival correspondence indicate continuous institutional custody.1

“Letters of Joseph Smith, the Martyr,” Saints’ Herald, 1 Dec. 1879, 356–357; Richard P. Howard, Independence, MO, to Richard Lloyd Anderson, Provo, UT, 10 Sept. 1971, photocopy, CHL.  


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