53992762

Letter to Hiram Barney, 3 March 1842

I make these observations that it may be understood in the commencement, that at the prices you suggest it would be useless to prosecute a correspondence on this subject; But, Sir, if the Lands can be furnished at a fair & honourable valuation & pay according to the spirit of the Times, I am ready to purchase. I say spirit of the Times.— because it seems to be that Spirit; for so many Banks to break, that it renders the circulating medium of the country so uncertain in its real value, that little is to be had, consequently property in general, the real articles themselves, must take the place of circulating medium; or become that article itself.—
If you would prefer— or Mr. Fisher,— to receive Eastern lands for the 20 acres included within the limits of our city

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, which you have refered to in your letter, I shall be able soon to accommodate you & will give $100. pr Lot, or acre; payable in lands or property in the Eastern States, as soon as convenience will admit of the exchange.
Or if you prefer, to make me an agent for the sale of the Lots at a stipulated sum, which I will name in the Letter of Attorney I will pay for the same, so fast as I shall collect on the Lots; though I do not think this would be as well for you, as to take Eastern Lands at once for collections on Lands must be uncertain, while the currency remains unchanged, or continues to grow worse: & why I say I will name the sum is, that I have no time to be troubled with an agency, for Lots held so high, that they could not be sold with a tolerable dispatch.
Should either of the above propositions meet your approbations, you will please communicate; and be free to make any communications you may think proper, in relation to the matter.
With sentiments of high consideration, I remain, Sir, most respectfully, your friend & servant.
Joseph Smith
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
Clerk—
P. S. The first Number of the Times & Seasons which I have issued as Editor, comes from the press this evening.— And I shall take the liberty to express my friendship to you by mailing a copy of the same to your address, in connexion with this Letter .— [p. 228]
I make these observations that it may be understood in the com mencement, that at the prices you suggest it would be useless to  prosecute a correspondence on this subject; But, Sir, if the Lands can  be furnished at a fair & honourable valuation & pay according to the  spirit of the Times, I am ready to purchase. I say spirit of the Times.—  because it seems to be that Spirit; for so many Banks to break, that  it renders the circulating medium of the country so uncertain in its  real value, that little is to be had, consequently property in general, the real  articles themselves, must take the place of circulating medium; or become  that article itself.—
If you would prefer— or Mr. Fisher,— to receive Eastern lands  for the 20 acres included within the limits of our city

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, which you have  refered to in your letter, I shall be able soon to accommodate you & will  give $100. pr Lot, or acre; payable in lands or property in the Eastern  States, as soon as convenience will admit of the exchange.
Or if you prefer, to make me an agent for the sale of the  Lots at a stipulated sum, which I will name in the Letter of Attorney  I will pay for the same, so fast as I shall collect on the Lots; though I do  not think this would be as well for you, as to take Eastern Lands at once  for collections on Lands must be uncertain, while the currency remains  unchanged, or continues to grow worse: & why I say I will name the  sum is, that I have no time to be troubled with an agency, for Lots  held so high, that they could not be sold with a tolerable dispatch.
Should either of the above propositions meet your approbations,  you will please communicate; and be free to make any communications  you may think proper, in relation to the matter.
With sentiments of high consideration, I remain, Sir, most  respectfully, your friend & servant.
Joseph Smith
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
Clerk—
P. S. The first Number of the Times & Seasons which I  have issued as Editor, comes from the press this evening.— And I  shall take the liberty to express my friendship to you by mailing  a copy of the same to your address, in connexion with this Letter .— [p. 228]
Previous
JS, Letter, Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, IL, to Hiram Barney, New York City

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

More Info
, NY, 3 Mar. 1842; in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 227–228; handwriting of Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
; CHL.

Facts