31087

Letter to John Thornton and Others, 25 June 1834

Rush Creek.

Rises two miles northeast of Liberty, Missouri. Flows about ten miles southeast to confluence with Missouri River. Camp of Israel, including JS, camped near creek, 24–26 June 1834. Cholera epidemic killed thirteen Camp of Israel participants and two church...

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Clay Co. June 25”—
“Gent, our company of men advanced yesterday from their encampment beyond Fishing River

Consists of two forks, Big Fishing River and Little Fishing River, which conjoin near Excelsior Springs, Missouri. River then flows southeasterly through Clay and Ray counties. River provided water power for Clay County. Early settlers in area lived along...

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to Rush Creek

Rises two miles northeast of Liberty, Missouri. Flows about ten miles southeast to confluence with Missouri River. Camp of Israel, including JS, camped near creek, 24–26 June 1834. Cholera epidemic killed thirteen Camp of Israel participants and two church...

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, where their tents are again pitched. But feeling disposed to adopt every pacific measure that can be done, without jeopardizing our lives, to quiet the prejudices and fears of some part of the citizens of this county, we have concluded that our company shall be immediately dispersed and continue so. till every effort for an adjustment of differences between us and the people of Jackson

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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has been made [p. 505]
Rush Creek.

Rises two miles northeast of Liberty, Missouri. Flows about ten miles southeast to confluence with Missouri River. Camp of Israel, including JS, camped near creek, 24–26 June 1834. Cholera epidemic killed thirteen Camp of Israel participants and two church...

More Info
Clay Co. June 25”—
“Gent, our company of men advanced yesterday from  their encampment beyond Fishing River

Consists of two forks, Big Fishing River and Little Fishing River, which conjoin near Excelsior Springs, Missouri. River then flows southeasterly through Clay and Ray counties. River provided water power for Clay County. Early settlers in area lived along...

More Info
to Rush Creek

Rises two miles northeast of Liberty, Missouri. Flows about ten miles southeast to confluence with Missouri River. Camp of Israel, including JS, camped near creek, 24–26 June 1834. Cholera epidemic killed thirteen Camp of Israel participants and two church...

More Info
, where  their tents are again pitched. But feeding feeling disposed to adopt  every pacific measure than that can be done, without jeopard izing their our lives, to quiet the prejudices and fears of some  part of the citizens of this county, we have concluded that  our company shall be immediately dispersed and con tinue so. till every effort for an adjustment of differences  between us and the people of Jackson

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
has been made [p. 505]
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JS, Letter, Rush Creek

Rises two miles northeast of Liberty, Missouri. Flows about ten miles southeast to confluence with Missouri River. Camp of Israel, including JS, camped near creek, 24–26 June 1834. Cholera epidemic killed thirteen Camp of Israel participants and two church...

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, MO, to John Thornton and others, Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, MO, 25 June 1834; in Manuscript History of the Church, volume A-1, pp. 505–506; handwriting of Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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; CHL.

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