2476866

Letter to William W. Phelps, 31 July 1832

we learned by Broth John

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
s letter that the devel had set to work to reward us by stirring up your hearts (I mean those who were engaged in this wickedness) by raking up evry fault, which those eyes that are filled with beams could see in looking for motes in the eyes of those who are laboring with tender and prayerful hearts continually for there salvation, and not being content with bringing up those things which had been settled & forgiven & which they dare not bring to our faces but many with which we were charged with were absolutely false & could not come from any other sourse than the father of all lies & this is the thanks & the reward the advisary saught to reward us by the instrumantality of those who should have been our staff & after our detention on the road I often times wandered alone in the lonely places seeking consolation of him who is alone able to console me, while my beloved Brother Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

View Full Bio
(who is without gile) poured out his soul with much weeping upon his pillow for you or for Zion while I in the lonely places communed with him who is altogether lovely witnessed your case & viewed the conspiricy with much grief and learned the displeasure of heaven and veewed the frowns of the heavenly hosts upon zion & upon all the earth, and my Brethren I would inform you that I do not fellowship the letter which was writen to me by Bro. John

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
& neither the spirit thereof, I do not plead guilty of the charges made against me in that letter. I have not given occasion of offence to the brethren or sisters in zion, neither of Jealousy, or evel surmisings. I have ever been filled with the greatest anxiety for them, & have taken the greatest intrest for there welfare. I am a lover of the cause of Christ and of Virtue chastity and an upright steady course of conduct & a holy walk, I dispise a hypocrite or a covenant breaker, I judge them not, God shall Judge them according to there works, I am a lover even of mine enimies for an enimy seeketh to destroy openly, I can pray for those who dispitefully use and persicute me, but for all I can not hope, and now I conjure and exhort mine accusers and the hypocrite in zion in the love of Christ [p. 3]
we learned by Broth John

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
s letter that the devel had set to work to reward us  by stirring up your hearts (I mean those who were engaged in this wickedness) by  raking up evry fault, which those eyes that are filled with beams could see in  looking for motes in the eyes of those who are laboring with tender and <prayerful>  hearts continually for there salvation, and not being content with bringing  up those things which had been settled & forgiven & which they dare  not bring to our faces but many with which we were charged  with were absolutely false & could not come from any other sourse  than the fath[e]r of all lies & this is the thanks & the reward the ad visary saught to reward us by the instrumantality of those who  should have been our staff & after our detention on the road I  often times wandered alone in the lonely places seeking consolation  of him who is <alone> able to console me, while my beloved Brothe[r]  Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

View Full Bio
(who is without gile) poured out his soul with  much weeping upon his pillow for you or for Zion while I  in <the> lonely places communed with him whi[c]h who is altogeth[e]r lovely  witnessed your case & viewed the conspiricy with much grief  and learned the displeasure of heaven and veewed the frowns  of the heavenly hosts upon zion & upon all the earth, and  my Brethren I would inform you that I do not fellowship  the letter which was writen to me by Bro. John

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
& neither  the spirit thereof, I do not plead guilty of the charges made  against me in that letter. I have not given occasion of  offence to the brethren or sisters in zion, neither of Jealous y, or evel surmisings. I have ever been filled with  the greatest anxiety for them, & have taken the greatest  intrest for there welfare. I am a lover of the cause of Christ  and of Virtue chastity and an upright steady course  of conduct & a holy walk, I dispise a hypocrite or a covenant  breaker, I judge them not, God shall Judge them according  to there works, I am a lover even of mine enimies for an  enimy seeketh to destroy openly, I can pray for those who  dispitefully use and persicute me, but for all I can not  hope, and now I conjure you and exhort mine accusers  and the hypocrite in zion in the love of Christ [p. 3]
PreviousNext
By the time JS composed this candid letter to colleagues in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, he had been dealing with disharmony among church leaders for a full year. There were disagreements over the method for establishing Zion, proper handling of church resources, local control of church affairs in Missouri, and the extent of JS’s power and authority. In this letter, JS confronted these persistent strains and tensions with expressions of both reconciliation and frustration.
JS wrote this letter from Hiram

Area settled by immigrants from Pennsylvania and New England, ca. 1802. Located in northeastern Ohio about twenty-five miles southeast of Kirtland. Population in 1830 about 500. Population in 1840 about 1,100. JS lived in township at home of John and Alice...

More Info
, Ohio, to William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
at Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

More Info
, Missouri. Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

View Full Bio
drafted this retained copy, which was apparently transcribed for Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

View Full Bio
.

Facts