53991682

Letterbook 2

I do not say that you shall go now, but you must not think of staying here another season, or of putting in crops for the moment you do so, the citizens will be upon you, and if I am called here again in case of non-compliance with the treaty made, do not think that I shall act any more as I have done now; You need not expect any mercy, but extermination, for I am determined the Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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’s order shall be executed.— As for your leaders, do not once think do not imagine for a moment, do not let it enter into your minds, that they will be delivered and restored to you again; for their fate is fixed, the die is cast, their doom is sealed.— I am sorry gentlemen to see so many apparently intelligent men found in the situation that you are, and Oh! Could I invoke that great spirit the Unknown God to rest upon you, and deliver you from that awful chain of superstition, and liberate you from those fetters of fanaticism with which you are bound, that you no longer do homage to a man.
I would advise you to scatter abroad, And never again organize yourselves with Bishops, Presidents &c lest you excite the jealousies of the people and subject yourselves to the same calamities that have now come upon you. You have always been the aggressors, You have brought upon yourselves these difficulties by being disaffected, and not being subject to rule, And my advice is that you become as other Citizens, lest by a recurrence of these events you bring upon yourselves irretrievable ruin.

Isaac Galland to David W. Rogers • 26 February 1839

Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

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Ill, Feby 26th 1839.
Mr David W. Rogers
Dear Sir
Your’s of the 11th Inst was received yesterday I perceive that it had been written before your brethren visited my house— I had also wrote to Mr Barlow before I received yours, and which is herewith also sent. I wish here to remark that about 10 or 15 houses or cabbins can be had in this neighborhood, and several farms may be rented here. On the Half breed lands

Tract consisted of 119,000 acres located in southeastern Iowa between Des Moines and Mississippi rivers. In 1824, U.S. Congress set aside tract for offspring of American Indian mothers and white fathers. Subsequent act passed, 1834, relinquishing Congress...

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I think that more than 50 families can be accommodated with places to dwell in, but not a great quantity of cultivated land, As the improvements on that tract are generally new, there are however several farms which can also be rented. Since writing to Mr Barlow, I have conversed with a friend of mine, who has also conversed with Governor Robert Lucas of Ioway Territory

Area originally part of Louisiana Purchase, 1803. First permanent white settlements established, ca. 1833. Organized as territory, 1838, containing all of present-day Iowa, much of present-day Minnesota, and parts of North and South Dakota. Population in ...

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in relation to your Church and people. Governor Lucas says, that the people called Mormons were good Citizens of the State of Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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, and that he respects them now as good and virtuous citizens, and feels disposed to treat them [p. 1]
I do not say that you shall go now, but you must not think of staying here  another season, or of putting <in> crops for the moment you do so, the citizens will be  upon you, and if I am called here again in case of non-compliance with the  treaty made, do not think that I shall act any more as I have done now; You  need not expect any mercy, but extermination, for I am determined the  Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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’s orders shall be executed.— As for your leaders, do not once think  do not imagine for a moment, do not let it enter into your minds, that they will  be delivered and restored to you again; for their fate is fixed, the die is cast,  their doom is sealed.— I am sorry gentlemen to see so many apparently  intelligent men found in the situation that you are, and Oh! Could I invoke  that great spirit of the Unknown God to rest upon you, and deliver you from  that awful chain of superstition, and liberate you from those fetters of fan aticism with which you are bound, that you no longer do homage to a man.
I would advise you to scatter abroad, And never again organize  yourselves with Bishops, Presidents &c lest you excite the jealousies of the people and  subject yourselves to the same calamities that have now come upon you.  You have always been the aggressors, You have brought upon yourselves these  difficulties by being disaffected, and not being subject to rule, And my advice  is that you become as other Citizens, lest by a recurrence of these events you  bring upon yourselves irretrievable ruin.

Isaac Galland to David W. Rogers • 26 February 1839

Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

More Info
Ill, Feby 26th 1839.
Mr D[avid] W. Rogers
Dear Sir
Your’s of the 11th Inst was received yesterday  I perceive that it had been written before your brethren visited my house— I had  also wrote to Mr Barlow before I received yours, and which is herewith also sent.  I wish here to remark that about 10 or 15 houses or cabbins can be had in this neigh borhood, and several farms may be rented here. On the Half breed lands

Tract consisted of 119,000 acres located in southeastern Iowa between Des Moines and Mississippi rivers. In 1824, U.S. Congress set aside tract for offspring of American Indian mothers and white fathers. Subsequent act passed, 1834, relinquishing Congress...

More Info
I think  that more than 50 families can be accommodated with places to dwell in, but not a  great quantity of cultivated land, As the improvements on that tract are generally new,  there are however several farms which can also be rented. Since writing to Mr  Barlow, I have conversed with a friend of mine, who has also conversed with Governor  [Robert] Lucas of Ioway Territory

Area originally part of Louisiana Purchase, 1803. First permanent white settlements established, ca. 1833. Organized as territory, 1838, containing all of present-day Iowa, much of present-day Minnesota, and parts of North and South Dakota. Population in ...

More Info
in relation to your Church and people. Governor Lucas  says, that the people called Mormons were good Citizens of the State of Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
, and that  he respects them now as good and virtuous citizens, and feels disposed to treat them [p. 1]
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Letterbook 2, [1839–ca. summer 1843]; handwriting of Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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, James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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, Robert B. Thompson

1 Oct. 1811–27 Aug. 1841. Clerk, editor. Born in Great Driffield, Yorkshire, England. Member of Methodist church. Immigrated to Upper Canada, 1834. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt, May 1836, in Upper Canada. Ordained an elder by John Taylor, 22...

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, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, John Fullmer

21 July 1807–8 Oct. 1883. Farmer, newsman, postmaster, teacher, merchant. Born at Huntington, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Fullmer and Susannah Zerfass. Moved to Nashville, Davidson Co., Tennessee, spring 1832. Married Mary Ann Price, 24 May 1837...

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, William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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, and George Walker; 238 leaves, 245 pages of letters, plus 26 pages of index and 83 pages of company records for Rigdon, Smith, & Co.; JS Collection, CHL.
Note: This book was originally used as a ledger, then turned over and repurposed as a letterbook. The ledger portion will be posted on this website at a later date.

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