53991845

Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

“But,” rejoined I, “the scriptures say “prove all things;’” and now sir let me tell you boldly, that book contains the everlasting gospel; and it was writen for the salvation of your soul by the gift and power of the Holy Ghost.”
“Pooh,’ said the minister “nonsense— I am not afraid of any member of my church being led astray by such stuff: they have too much intelligence.”
“Now Mr Ruggles,’ said I, and I spoke with emphasis, for the spirit of God was upon me, “Mark my words, as true as God lives, before three years we will have more than one third of your Church; and sir, whether you believe it or not, we will take the very Deacon too
This produced a hearty laugh at the expense of the minister.
Not to be tedious, I will say that I remained in this section of country about 4 weeks. During which time, I labored incessantly for the truths sake; and succeded in gaining the hearts of many; among whom were David Dort

6 Jan. 1793–10 Mar. 1841. Farmer, miller. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of John Dort and Elishaba Briggs. Married first JS’s cousin Mary (Polly) Mack, 2 June 1813, at Gilsum. After Mary’s death, married her sister Fanny Mack. Moved to Pontiac...

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and his wife. Many desired me to use my influence to have an Elder sent into that region of country; which I agreed to do. As I was about starting home Mr. Cooper observed that our ministers would have more influence, if they dressed in broadcloth.
When I returned I made known to Joseph the situation of things where I had been; so he despatched brother Jared Carter

14 June 1801–6 July 1849. Born at Killingworth, Middlesex Co., Connecticut. Son of Gideon Carter and Johanna Sims. Moved to Benson, Rutland Co., Vermont, by 1810. Married Lydia Ames, 20 Sept. 1823, at Benson. Moved to Chenango, Broome Co., New York, by Jan...

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to that country. And in order that he might he might not lack influence, he was dressed in a suit of superfine broad cloth. He went immediately into the midst of Mr. Ruggle’s Church, and in a short time brought away 70 of his best members; among whom was the very Deacon too, just as I told him. This deacon was brother Samuel Bent, who now presides over the High Council.
In less than a month after my arrival, Samuel [Smith]

13 Mar. 1808–30 July 1844. Farmer, logger, scribe, builder, tavern operator. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, by Mar. 1810; to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811...

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ret [p. 213]
“But,” rejoined I, “the scriptures say “prove all things;’”  and now sir let me tell you boldly, that book contains  the everlasting gospel; and it was writen for the salvation  of your soul by the gift and power of the Holy Ghost.”
“Pooh,’ said the minister “nonsense— I am not afraid of any  member of my church being led astray by such stuff: they have  too much intelligence.”
“Now Mr Ruggles,’ said I, and I spoke with emphasis, for  the spirit of God was upon me, “Mark my words, as true as  there is a God which God lives, before three years we will have more than one  third of your Church; and sir, whether you believe it or not,  we will take the very Deacon too
This produced a hearty laugh at the expense of the min ister.
Not to be tedious, I will say that I remained in this  section of country about 4 weeks. During which time, I  labored incessantly for the truths sake; and successful succeded in  gaining the hearts of many; among whom were David Dort

6 Jan. 1793–10 Mar. 1841. Farmer, miller. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of John Dort and Elishaba Briggs. Married first JS’s cousin Mary (Polly) Mack, 2 June 1813, at Gilsum. After Mary’s death, married her sister Fanny Mack. Moved to Pontiac...

View Full Bio
 and his wife. Many desired me to use my influence  to have an Elder sent into that region of country; which I  agreed to do. As I was about starting home Mr. Cooper  observed that our ministers would have more influence, if  they dressed in broadcloth.
When I returned I made known to Joseph the situa tion of things where I had been; so he despatched brother  Jared Carter

14 June 1801–6 July 1849. Born at Killingworth, Middlesex Co., Connecticut. Son of Gideon Carter and Johanna Sims. Moved to Benson, Rutland Co., Vermont, by 1810. Married Lydia Ames, 20 Sept. 1823, at Benson. Moved to Chenango, Broome Co., New York, by Jan...

View Full Bio
to that country. And in order that he mig ht he might not lack influence, he was dressed in a suit  of superfine broad cloth. He went immediately into the  midst of Mr. Ruggle’s Church, and in a short time bro ught away 70 of his best members; among whom was the  very Deacon too, just as I told him <him>. This deacon was  brother <Samuel> Bent, who now presides over the High Council.
In less than a month after my arrival, Samuel [Smith]

13 Mar. 1808–30 July 1844. Farmer, logger, scribe, builder, tavern operator. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, by Mar. 1810; to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811...

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ret [p. 213]
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Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845; handwriting of Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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and Martha Jane Knowlton Coray; 337 pages; CHL.
Note: Lucy Mack Smith

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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, the mother of Joseph Smith, dictated a rough draft version of her history to Martha Jane Knowlton Coray (with some additional scribal help from Martha’s husband, Howard

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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) beginning in 1844 and concluding in 1845. In 1845, the Corays inscribed this fair copy of the history under Lucy’s direction.

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