53991845

Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

she got to Huntsville

Located in north-central Missouri. Settled in 1820s. Randolph Co. seat. Described in 1837 as having brick courthouse and seven stores, but no church buildings. Members of 1834 Camp of Israel and 1838 Kirtland Camp passed through Huntsville en route to Missouri...

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she was wet and cold. We put her immediately into a dry bed; soon after which, she had an ague fit. The Elders were called to lay hands upon her. After this she seemed better; but continued weak and inclined to chills and fever some time.
The day following, I washed a quantity of clothes; after which we proceeded on our journey and met with no farther difficulty till we arrived at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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.
We moved into a small log house, having but one room; a very inconveinient place for a large family. Joseph saw how uncomfortably we were situated, and proposed that we should take a large tavern house, which he had recently purchased of brother [Sidney] Gilbert

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

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. We took the tavern and moved into it. Samuel [Smith]

13 Mar. 1808–30 July 1844. Farmer, logger, scribe, builder, tavern operator. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, by Mar. 1810; to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811...

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, previous to this had moved to a place, called Marrowbone. William [Smith]

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

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had moved 30 miles in another direction: we were all now quite comfortable. But this state of affairs was of short duration; for, it was not long before our peace was again disturbed by the mob. An Election took place at Gallatin

Founded and laid out, 1837. Unofficial county seat, beginning 1837. Officially named county seat, 1841. Several Latter-day Saints attempted to vote at Gallatin, 6 Aug. 1838, but were attacked by local residents. After Mormon-Missouri conflict erupted, Saints...

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the county seat of Daviess County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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: the brethren went to the polls as usual, but on attempting to vote they were forbidden by the mob. They however paid no attention to this; but proceeded to vote: upon which one of the mob knocked down one of the brethren Four others came to the assistance of the fallen Man, and shared the same fate. The mob saw the discomfeiture of their champions with shame and disapointment, and not choosing to render them any present help, they waited till evening, when, procuring the aid of the judge of the election, they wrote letters to all the adjoining Counties, begging their assistance against the Mormons. They stated, that Joseph Smith had himself killed seven men at the election the day previous; and that the inhabitants had every reason to ex [p. 247]
she got to Huntsville

Located in north-central Missouri. Settled in 1820s. Randolph Co. seat. Described in 1837 as having brick courthouse and seven stores, but no church buildings. Members of 1834 Camp of Israel and 1838 Kirtland Camp passed through Huntsville en route to Missouri...

More Info
she was wet and cold. We put her im mediately into a dry bed; soon after which, she had an ague  fit. The Elders were called to lay hands upon her. After  this she seemed better; but continued weak and inclined  to chills and fever some time.
The day following, I washed a quantity of clothes; af ter which we proceeded on our journey and met with no far ther difficulty on till we arrived at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
.
We moved into a small log house, having but one room;  a very inconveinient place for a large family. Joseph saw how  uncomfortably we were situated, and proposed that we should  take a large tavern house, which he had recently purchased of  brother [Sidney] Gilbert

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

View Full Bio
. We took the tavern and moved into it.  Samuel [Smith]

13 Mar. 1808–30 July 1844. Farmer, logger, scribe, builder, tavern operator. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, by Mar. 1810; to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811...

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, previous to this had moved to a place, called Ma rrowbone. William [Smith]

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

View Full Bio
had moved 30 miles in another direction:  we were all now quite comfortable. But this state of affairs  was of short duration; for, it was not long before our peace was  again disturbed by the mob. An Election took place at Ga l[l]atin

Founded and laid out, 1837. Unofficial county seat, beginning 1837. Officially named county seat, 1841. Several Latter-day Saints attempted to vote at Gallatin, 6 Aug. 1838, but were attacked by local residents. After Mormon-Missouri conflict erupted, Saints...

More Info
the county seat of Davies[s] County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
: the brethren went to  the polls as usual, to vote but on attempting to vote they were  forbidden by the mob. They however paid no attention to this ; but proceeded to vote: upon which one of the mob <knocked down one of the brethren> struck  brother John Butler

8 Apr. 1808–10 Apr. 1860. Schoolteacher, farmer, cooper, blacksmith. Born at Warren Co. (later Simpson Co.), Kentucky. Son of James Butler and Charity Lowe. Member of Methodist church, then Baptist church. Married Caroline Farzine Skeen, 3 Feb. 1831, at Sumner...

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a heavy blow; which was returned by  the latter with a force that brought his antagonist to the groun d.
Four others came to the assistance of the fallen Man, and  shared the same fate. The mob saw the discomfeiture of their  champions with shame and disapointment, and not choosing to  render them any present help, they waited till evening, when,  procuring the assistance <aid> of the judge of the election, they w rote letters to all the adjoining Counties, begging their assista nce against the Mormons. They stated, that Joseph Smi th had himself killed seven men at the election the day  previous; and that the inhabitants had every reason to ex [p. 247]
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Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845; handwriting of Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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and Martha Jane Knowlton Coray; 337 pages; CHL.
Note: Lucy Mack Smith

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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, the mother of Joseph Smith, dictated a rough draft version of her history to Martha Jane Knowlton Coray (with some additional scribal help from Martha’s husband, Howard

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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) beginning in 1844 and concluding in 1845. In 1845, the Corays inscribed this fair copy of the history under Lucy’s direction.

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