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Revelation, 10 January 1832 [D&C 73]

This revelation instructed JS, Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, and the other elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

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of the church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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to continue preaching “in the reagions round about” until the convening of another church conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

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. In accordance with direction given in a December 1831 revelation, JS and Rigdon had set aside their Bible revision work so they could preach to church members and others in the general vicinity around Hiram

Area settled by immigrants from Pennsylvania and New England, ca. 1802. Located in northeastern Ohio about twenty-five miles southeast of Kirtland. Population in 1830 about 500. Population in 1840 about 1,100. JS lived in township at home of John and Alice...

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and Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio.1

Revelation, 1 Dec. 1831 [D&C 71:2].  


Their preaching, as well as that of other elders sent from Kirtland, was intended in part to combat misinformation and criticism published by former church member Ezra Booth

14 Feb. 1792–before 12 Jan. 1873. Farmer, minister. Born in Newtown, Fairfield Co., Connecticut. Admitted on trial to Methodist ministry, 4 Sept. 1816, and stationed in the Ohio District in Beaver, Pike Co. Admitted into full connection and elected a deacon...

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in the Ohio Star.2

JS History, vol. A-1, 179.  


Following instructions in the December revelation to “call upon” the church’s critics “to meet you both in publick and in private,” Rigdon challenged Booth and Symonds Rider

20 Nov. 1792–1 Aug. 1870. Farmer, teacher, minister. Born in Hartford, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joshua Ryder and Marilla Loomis. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, 6 Jan. 1814. Married Mahitable Loomis, 12 Nov. 1818, in Portage Co. Served as captain in...

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, a former member in Hiram, to defend their claims against the church in public, but neither man accepted.3

Revelation, 1 Dec. 1831 [D&C 71:7]; Sidney Rigdon, “To the Public,” Ohio Star (Ravenna), 15 Dec. 1831, [3]; “To the Public,” Ohio Star, 12 Jan. 1832, [3].  


According to a later JS history, these efforts “did much towards allaying the excited feelings” that stemmed from Booth’s influence.4

JS History, vol. A-1, 179.  


JS and Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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returned to Hiram

Area settled by immigrants from Pennsylvania and New England, ca. 1802. Located in northeastern Ohio about twenty-five miles southeast of Kirtland. Population in 1830 about 500. Population in 1840 about 1,100. JS lived in township at home of John and Alice...

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, Ohio, around 8 January 1832, and on 10 January JS dictated this revelation, “making known the will of the Lord” regarding what they and the elders should do until the next conference, which was held two weeks later.5

JS History, vol. A-1, 179–180. A conference held in Orange, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, on 25–26 October 1831 appointed 25 January 1832 as the date of the next “General Conference.” (Minutes, 25–26 Oct. 1831.)  


In addition to instructing JS, Rigdon, and the other elders to continue preaching, the revelation directed JS and Rigdon to renew their work on the Bible revision after the conclusion of the upcoming conference.
JS probably dictated this revelation to Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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in an upstairs bedroom of the John

14 Apr. 1779–30 July 1843. Farmer, innkeeper. Born at Chesterfield, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of Israel Johnson and Abigail Higgins. Married Alice (Elsa) Jacobs, 22 June 1800. Moved to Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont, ca. 1803. Settled at Hiram, Portage...

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and Alice (Elsa) Jacobs Johnson home where they worked on the Bible revision.6

Staker, Hearken, O Ye People, 314.  


A copy of the revelation inscribed by Rigdon was provided to Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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, the newly appointed bishop

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. JS appointed Edward Partridge as the first bishop in February 1831. Following this appointment, Partridge functioned as the local leader of the church in Missouri. Later revelations described a bishop’s duties as receiving...

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in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, perhaps shortly thereafter.7

The document appears to be a copy for several reasons. After a revelation was taken down from oral dictation, one or more fair copies were generally made and the copies were kept or distributed. Rigdon wrote “N K. Whitney Kirtland ohio” on the back of this revelation. That this document was marked as being intended for Whitney suggests that it was a copy, not the original. The replacement in the body of the initial inscription of “it is expedient” (a later phrase in the revelation) with “it is practicable” is apparently the correction of a copying error, which also suggests that this document is a copy. Whitney may have received a copy because a December 1831 revelation instructed “the Elders of the church” in Ohio to “render an account of their stewardship unto the Bishop” in Ohio. “Stewardship” in this instance may have encompassed responsibilities to preach. Whatever the reason, elders sent accounts of their missions to Whitney in 1831 and 1832. As is evident from analysis of the Newel K. Whitney Papers at Brigham Young University, Whitney received copies of revelations and other documents as well, perhaps in his role as overseer of church property and resources in Ohio. (See, for example, revelations in Newel K. Whitney Papers, BYU; and Joseph Coe, Report, 7 Mar. 1832, Missionary Reports, 1831–1900, CHL; see also Revelation, 4 Dec. 1831–A [D&C 72:5].)  


The revelation’s instructions to the elders preaching in the area were probably spread through other copies or by word of mouth.

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