2476695

Revelation, 30 April 1832 [D&C 83]

Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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May 31st— 1832
Verily thus saith the Lord in addition to the laws of the church1

The published version of this revelation in the January 1833 issue of The Evening and the Morning Star places a comma here to clarify that this is something given “in addition to the laws of the church,” not “in addition to the laws of the church concerning women and children.” (See “Items in Addition to the Laws for the Government of the Church of Christ, Given April, 1832,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Jan. 1833, [6].)  


concerning women and children who belong to the church who have lost their husbands or fathers women have claim on their husbands untill they are taken and if they are not found transgressors they remain upon their inheritinces

Generally referred to land promised by or received from God for the church and its members. A January 1831 revelation promised church members a land of inheritance. In March and May 1831, JS dictated revelations commanding members “to purchase lands for an...

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all children have claim upon their parents untill they are of age3

Later deeds of consecration contained similar language, stating that upon the death of the individual consecrating the property, “his wife or widow, being at the same time a member of the church, has claim” on the property “upon precisely the same conditions that her said husband had them.” Deeds also stated that orphans had claim on their parents’ inheritance “for their support, until they shall become of age.” Under Missouri law, children came of age when they were twenty-one. (James Lee and Edward Partridge, Agreement of Consecration, ca. 1832–1833, incorporated as part of Edward Partridge, Jackson Co., MO, to “Honored Father” et al., 22 Oct. 1834, Edward Partridge, Papers CHL; Tipton v. Montgomery [Mo. Sup. Ct. 1824], Missouri Supreme Court Historical Database, 1790–1880, MSA; Adams v. Harmon [Mo. Sup. Ct. 1833], Missouri Supreme Court Historical Database, 1790–1880, MSA.)  


and after that they have claim upon the church or in other words the Lords storehouse

Both a literal and a figurative repository for goods and land donated to the church. The book of Malachi directed the house of Israel to bring “all the tithes into the storehouse, that there may be meat in mine house.” In JS’s revision of the Old Testament...

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for inheritences

Generally referred to land promised by or received from God for the church and its members. A January 1831 revelation promised church members a land of inheritance. In March and May 1831, JS dictated revelations commanding members “to purchase lands for an...

View Glossary
4

Although the revelation begins with a statement about children who had lost their fathers, the remainder of the revelation does not explain how the church would help such children. Perhaps for this reason, the version of this revelation that Frederick G. Williams recorded in Revelation Book 2 sometime in 1834—as well as the published version in the 1835 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants—replaced “for inheritences” with “if their parents have not wherewith to give them inheritancs and the storehouse shall be kept by the consecrations of the church that widows and orphans shall be provided for as also the poor.” (See Revelation Book 2, p. 93; and Doctrine and Covenants 89, 1835 ed. [D&C 83:5–6].)  


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Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
May 30 31st— 1832
Verily thus saith the Lord in addition to the laws  of the church1

The published version of this revelation in the January 1833 issue of The Evening and the Morning Star places a comma here to clarify that this is something given “in addition to the laws of the church,” not “in addition to the laws of the church concerning women and children.” (See “Items in Addition to the Laws for the Government of the Church of Christ, Given April, 1832,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Jan. 1833, [6].)  


concerning women and children who belong  to the church who have lost their husbands or fathers2

TEXT: Possibly “father<s>”.  


<a>  women <woman> <women> have <has> <have> claim on their husbands untill <t>he<y> is <are> taken  and if they are not found transgressors they remain upon  their inheritinces

Generally referred to land promised by or received from God for the church and its members. A January 1831 revelation promised church members a land of inheritance. In March and May 1831, JS dictated revelations commanding members “to purchase lands for an...

View Glossary
all children have claim upon their pa rents untill they are of age3

Later deeds of consecration contained similar language, stating that upon the death of the individual consecrating the property, “his wife or widow, being at the same time a member of the church, has claim” on the property “upon precisely the same conditions that her said husband had them.” Deeds also stated that orphans had claim on their parents’ inheritance “for their support, until they shall become of age.” Under Missouri law, children came of age when they were twenty-one. (James Lee and Edward Partridge, Agreement of Consecration, ca. 1832–1833, incorporated as part of Edward Partridge, Jackson Co., MO, to “Honored Father” et al., 22 Oct. 1834, Edward Partridge, Papers CHL; Tipton v. Montgomery [Mo. Sup. Ct. 1824], Missouri Supreme Court Historical Database, 1790–1880, MSA; Adams v. Harmon [Mo. Sup. Ct. 1833], Missouri Supreme Court Historical Database, 1790–1880, MSA.)  


and after that they have  claim upon the church or in other words the Lords store house

Both a literal and a figurative repository for goods and land donated to the church. The book of Malachi directed the house of Israel to bring “all the tithes into the storehouse, that there may be meat in mine house.” In JS’s revision of the Old Testament...

View Glossary
for inheritences

Generally referred to land promised by or received from God for the church and its members. A January 1831 revelation promised church members a land of inheritance. In March and May 1831, JS dictated revelations commanding members “to purchase lands for an...

View Glossary
4

Although the revelation begins with a statement about children who had lost their fathers, the remainder of the revelation does not explain how the church would help such children. Perhaps for this reason, the version of this revelation that Frederick G. Williams recorded in Revelation Book 2 sometime in 1834—as well as the published version in the 1835 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants—replaced “for inheritences” with “if their parents have not wherewith to give them inheritancs and the storehouse shall be kept by the consecrations of the church that widows and orphans shall be provided for as also the poor.” (See Revelation Book 2, p. 93; and Doctrine and Covenants 89, 1835 ed. [D&C 83:5–6].)  


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Revelation, “Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
” [Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, Jackson Co., MO], 31 May [30 Apr.] 1832. Featured version copied [ca. 31 May 1832]; handwriting of Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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; one page; Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU. Includes docket and archival marking.
One leaf, measuring 5 × 7⅞ inches (13 × 20 cm). The top and the right side of the recto have the square cut of manufactured paper. The left side is unevenly cut, suggesting the leaf was excised from a book. The bottom of the leaf is unevenly torn off from what was originally a larger leaf. The document was later folded for filing and docketed by Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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in graphite: “as to Women & children; | Inheretance at Zion | 30 apl. 1832”.
This document and several other revelations, along with many other personal and institutional documents kept by Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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, were inherited by his daughter Mary Jane Whitney, who married Isaac Groo. This collection was passed down in the Groo family and donated by members of the family to the Harold B. Lee Library at Brigham Young University during the period 1969–1974.1

Andrus et al., “Register of the Newel Kimball Whitney Papers, 1825–1906,” 5–6.  


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