26033

Revelation, March 1829 [D&C 5]

pages & then shalt thou stop for a season even untill I command thee again. then thou mayest translate

To produce a text from one written in another language; in JS’s usage, most often through divine means. JS considered the ability to translate to be a gift of the spirit, like the gift of interpreting tongues. He recounted that he translated “reformed Egyptian...

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& excep thou do this Behold thou shalt have no more gift & I will take away the things which I have entrusted with thee14

This happened previously when JS disregarded divine counsel. (See Historical Introduction to Revelation, July 1828 [D&C 3].)  


& now because I foresee the lieing in wait to destroy thee yea I foresee that if my Servant humbleth not himself & receive a witness from my hand that he will fall into transgression & there are many that lie in wait to destroy thee off the face of the Earth & for this cause that thy Days may be prolounged I have given unto you these Commandments

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

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Yea for this Cause have I said stop & stand still untill I Command thee & I will provide means whereby thou mayest Accomplish the thing I have Commanded thee15

Among the “means” that would soon be provided to enable JS to continue the translation of the Book of Mormon was the arrival in early April of Oliver Cowdery, who would serve as JS’s scribe. Lucy Mack Smith later recalled that JS keenly felt the need for clerical assistance and “accordingly 2 or 3 days before the arrival of Oliver . . . called upon His Heavenly Father for the promised assistance and was informed that the same should be forthcoming in a few days.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845, bk. 8, [4].)  


& if thou art faithful in Keeping my Commandments ye shall be lifted up at the last Day [p. 3]
pages & then shalt thou stop for a season even untill  I command thee again. then thou mayest translate

To produce a text from one written in another language; in JS’s usage, most often through divine means. JS considered the ability to translate to be a gift of the spirit, like the gift of interpreting tongues. He recounted that he translated “reformed Egyptian...

View Glossary
& excep  thou do this Behold thou shalt have no more gift & I will  take away the things which I have entrusted with thee14

This happened previously when JS disregarded divine counsel. (See Historical Introduction to Revelation, July 1828 [D&C 3].)  


&  now because I foresee the lieing in wait to destroy  thee yea I foresee that if my Servant humbleth not  himself & receive a witness from my hand that he will  fall into transgression & there are many that lie in wait  to destroy thee off the face of the Earth & for this cause  that thy Days may be prolounged I have given unto you  these Commandments

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

View Glossary
Yea for this Cause have I said  stop & stand still untill I Command thee & I will pro vide means whereby thou mayest Accomplish the  thing I have Commanded thee15

Among the “means” that would soon be provided to enable JS to continue the translation of the Book of Mormon was the arrival in early April of Oliver Cowdery, who would serve as JS’s scribe. Lucy Mack Smith later recalled that JS keenly felt the need for clerical assistance and “accordingly 2 or 3 days before the arrival of Oliver . . . called upon His Heavenly Father for the promised assistance and was informed that the same should be forthcoming in a few days.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845, bk. 8, [4].)  


& if thou art faithful  in Keeping my Commandments ye shall be lifted  up at the last Day [p. 3]
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Revelation, [Harmony Township

Located in northeastern Pennsylvania. Area settled, by 1787. Organized 1809. Population in 1830 about 340. Population in 1840 about 520. Contained Harmony village (no longer in existence). Josiah Stowell hired JS to help look for treasure in area, Oct. 1825...

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, Susquehanna Co., PA, Mar. 1829]. Featured version copied [ca. Apr. 1829]; handwriting of Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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; three pages; Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU. Includes docket, later notations, and archival marking.
Single foolscap page folded in half to create two leaves, each measuring 12⅜ × 7½ inches (31 × 19 cm). Docket in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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on the verso of the final leaf reads “Respecting translating the | Book of mormon”. Other writing, consisting of unrelated lists of names and mathematical calculations, in both pencil and ink by an unidentified scribe appears to have been created circa mid-1830.
This document is part of a collection of revelations found within the Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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Papers, which comprise three different groups of material: early Mormon material, largely relating to the finances of the church; Newel K. Whitney personal papers; and Whitney family papers. The Whitney papers include nineteen manuscript revelations. The dates of the majority of the revelations indicate that Whitney, likely in his role as bishop of the church, received and retained copies of revelations from mid-1831 through late 1833. Because the featured text was dictated well before Whitney joined the church, it is unknown when or under what circumstances Whitney acquired this manuscript.
According to the register of the Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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Papers, following the death of Whitney, his daughter Mary Jane, who married Isaac Groo, obtained possession of the papers. The Brigham Young University library, Provo, Utah, acquired these papers from descendants of Mary Jane and Isaac Groo between 1969 and 1974.
All extant versions of this revelation that bear a date have it as March 1829. Although the featured version gives no explicit date of creation, Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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’s handwriting provides a clue to the dating. This document appears to provide one of only two known samples of Cowdery’s early stylized or formalized handwriting. The other is a 6 April 1829 agreement between JS and his father-in-law, Isaac Hale

21 Mar. 1763–11 Jan. 1839. Farmer, hunter, innkeeper. Born in Waterbury, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Reuben Hale and Diantha Ward. Member of Methodist church. Moved to Wells, Albany Co., New York (later in Rutland Co., Vermont), ca. 1771, to live with...

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.1 Once Cowdery began taking dictation from JS of the Book of Mormon translation, his handwriting evolved into the style that characterized his handwriting for the remainder of his life. If, as the similarities of handwriting style would suggest, this copy of the revelation was created around the same time as the above-mentioned agreement, the document would have been created circa April 1829. This creation date would make this the earliest extant version of any revelation text dictated by JS.

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