30731

Revised Plan of the House of the Lord, circa 10 August–circa 4 September 1833

Revised Plan of the House of the Lord, circa 10 August–circa 4 September 1833

An explanation of the following pattern.
This house

The official name for the sacred edifice in Kirtland, Ohio, later known as the Kirtland temple; also the official name for other planned religious structures in Missouri. JS and the Latter-day Saints also referred to the House of the Lord in Kirtland as “...

View Glossary
for the presidency

The presiding body of the church. From the day of the church’s organization on 6 April 1830, JS and Oliver Cowdery led the church in their capacity as elders. An 11 November 1831 revelation directed that “the duty of the president of the office of the high...

View Glossary
is to be built first in Zion; and is to be 97 feet long, and 61 feet wide within the walls, and divided and arranged in the following manner, viz: No. 1 is to represent a pulpit for the President of the high priesthood

The authority and power held by certain officers in the church. The Book of Mormon referred to the high priesthood as God’s “holy order, which was after the order of his Son,” and indicated that Melchizedek, a biblical figure, was a high priest “after this...

View Glossary
; and his counsellors; No. 2. Ditto for the bishop and his counsellors

Initially referred to a bishop’s ecclesiastical jurisdiction, but eventually described the ecclesiastical body comprising the bishop and his assistants, or counselors. John Corrill and Isaac Morley were called as assistants to Bishop Edward Partridge in 1831...

View Glossary
; No. 3. Do. for the high priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

View Glossary
, and No 4. Do. for the elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
. These seats are to occupy 9 by 14 feet, and are elevated as follows, viz the first, or No 4. one foot; the next, or No. 3. 2 feet, the next, or No. 2 3. feet the next, or No. 1. 4 feet. The three highest are to have each three Coves or stands for their respective speakers. The seats on each side are to be occupied by visiting brethren of the same grade of office, occupying 6 by 14 feet, and elevated as follows, viz: The first, or No. 4. are to be raised 8 inches, the second, or No. 3. 16 inches; the third, or No. 2. 24 inches; the fourth or No. 1. 32. inches. No.s 5, 6, 7, & 8, in the east end of the inner court represent pulpits to be oocupied by the lesser priesthood

The lower, or lesser, of two divisions of the priesthood. Sometimes called the Levitical priesthood. It was named for Aaron, the brother of Moses, “because it was conferred upon Aaron and his seed” in antiquity. JS and other church leaders taught that the...

View Glossary
, as follows, viz: No. 5. by the presidency

Organized body of leaders over priesthood quorums and various groups of Latter-day Saints. A November 1831 revelation underscored the importance of a president over the high priesthood and the church as a whole. By 1832, JS and two counselors constituted ...

View Glossary
; No. 6. by the priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. In the Book of Mormon, priests were described as those who baptized, administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto the church,” and taught “the things pertaining to the kingdom of God.” A June 1829 revelation directed...

View Glossary
; No. 7 by the teachers

Generally, one who instructs, but also an ecclesiastical and priesthood office. The Book of Mormon explained that teachers were to be ordained “to preach repentance and remission of sins through Jesus Christ, by the endurance of faith on his name to the end...

View Glossary
, and No. 8 by the deacons

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. The “Articles and Covenants” directed deacons to assist teachers in their duties. Deacons were also to “warn, expound, exhort, and teach and invite all to come unto Christ.” Although deacons did not have the authority...

View Glossary
. The side seats to be occupied by visiting officers of the same grade. The pulpits in the east are to be built after the same form, and elevated in the same manner as those in the west, all e off with pannel work in the best workmanlike manner. No. 9 represents five seats containing 12 by 14 feet, in each corner of the house, to be occupied by singers, constructed so as to face the respective pulpits, and elevated as follows, viz: The seat nearest the pulpit is to rise 6 inches, the next 12 inches, and so on to the last, one rising 6 inches higher than the other. No. 10 represents two rows of pews, one on each side of the house containing 45 by 14 feet, and divided into fourteen rows of seats each. No. 11 represents two tiers of pews, containing 25 by 12½ feet each, and each tier divided into fourteen seats each. No. 12 represents four Aisles, occupying 9 by 14 feet. There may be two in each aisle, the length of it, that is, 14 feet, one facing west, and the other east. No. 13 represents four fire-places. The chimneys should be constructed in the walls. No. 14 represents two aisles four feet wide, running the whole length of the inner court from east to west. No. 15 represents four aisles two feet wide between the pulpits. No. 16 represents two vestries for depositing the sacred furniture of the house. No. 17 represents stairways and stairs. No. 18 represents four inch spaces marked between the pews, for the purpose of dropping a curtain or vail, which is to hang in the upper wall, or arch to be dropped down at pleasure, and divide the house in to four parts if necessary, the vails crossing at right angles as marked on plan. No. 19 represents a swing table 2½ feet wide to be raised or let down at pleasure. This table is to hold the bread and wine

Primarily referred to the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper, or Communion, as opposed to other religious sacraments. The articles and covenants of the church directed “that the church meet together often to partake of bread and wine in remembrance of the Lord...

View Glossary
. No. 20 represents two seats, one to face each pulpit.
Note 1. Observe, that as there are pulpits in each end of the house, to avoid the necessity of the backs of the congregation being towards the speaker at any time, the house must be finished with pews instead of slips. The seats in the pews must be so constructed that they can be slipped, or moved from one side of the pew to the other at pleasure, and then the congregation can without trouble change their position at any time, and always face the speaker.
Note 2. The pulpit in the west end of the house is to have vails, so that they may be shut out from the view of the congregation whenever necessary: That is, a vail will hang between the President of the high priest hood and his counsellors, and the bishop; between the bishop and his counsellors, and the high priests; between the high priests and elders; between the elders and the congregation, that is, four vails. N.B. The pulpits in the east are to be furnished with vails in the same manner.
Note 3. The stairs are to commence from the outer doors, that is, firstly a broad step, and another at the angle as you ascend. N.B. The two doors leading into the inner court are to be double pannel, two feet each, opening four feet, the whole wedth of the aisles.
Note 4. The upper story is to be finished after the same form of the lower one, and each story must be at least fifteen feet between the floors.
Note 5. There must be hooks and rings to suspend the vails, or curtains with, so that they can be raised or let down at pleasure. N.B. Each room is to be finished with an eliptic arch.
Explanation of the Side View.
This view represents nine forty eight light windows above and below, of 7 by 9 glass. The east window below, opposite the vestry, is to be blind. The sils and lintels are to be hewn stone. The lintels are to extend each way a few inches, as represented on the plan. Gothics tops are to set over each window upon the lintels as represented on the plan. Raise the windows a propper distance from the foundations, according to judgment.
The foundation is to be rough stone a sufficient highth, and then four rows of hewn stone as represented on the plan; the remainder of the walls of brick of the best kind. Raise the ground round the house as high as the rough wall. And when all the houses are built upon the squares, the ground will rise at an equal distance from each.
Explanation of the End View. East.
This represents five windows, and two doors. Four of the windows of same as those in the side. The middle window is to contain 60 lights of glass besides the side lights, and the top. The doors are to be double pannel, each door to be 2½ feet wide, and to clear five feet when open. There are to be side lights as represented, and also gothic tops. The middle window is to be so set that the light will reflect above and below, as represented on the plan, where the line is drawn from side to side. The gable end is to be finished with a fan light as represented on the plan. N.B. Take the pitch of the roof from the draft.
Note 1. The doors are to open opposite the 4 feet aisles.
Note 2. There is to be a window as large as necessary, directly over the east pulpt, to convey the light from the outer court through to the inner court.
Note 3. There will be no petition in the upper story, there will be a railing over the lower petition far enough east to give room for a sufficient aisle. The east seats in the pulpits east will need a back work sufficiently high to rest the back.
Explanation of the End View West.
This represents nine windows; eight of them the same form & size of the side windows, and the middle one like the middle window in the east end. N.B. There being an error in putting the upper windows too low, it was thought needless to finish the plan; you will therefore put the four common windows above, the proper height. Also a fan light in the gable end.
It will be nesessary to have fourteen pillars for to support the building. Commence these pillars with rough stone as low in the surface as the rough foundation. These pillars are to be reared within the foundation walls. Wood will answer above the first & second floors; but they must stand directly over each other: That is, the pillars upon the first floor, must stand over, or upon those beneath, and so with those in the upper story.
☞Remarks.— Those patterns previously sent you, per mail, by our brethren, were incorrect in some respects; being drawn in grate haste. They have therefore drawn these, which are correct. The form of the city was also incorrect, being drawn in haste. We send you annother. I have found since my arrival, that our brethren here, have spared no pains nor labor to assist us in Zion in all things, as fast as they had understanding communicated to them. They have withheld no revelations, nor precious knowledge of any kind; neither have they failed, in the recption of our letters containing questions, to answer them immediately. I have every reason to believe, that we have often lost valuable information. In short, I may say, that our brethren here have always had the warmest feelings of friendship and esteem for us, and as deep an interest for the cause of Zion as ourselves; and even now, they pray for her deliverance unceasingly, and manifest a love for her inhabitants, stronger than death! And although it is manifest, that it is wisdom for me to tarry in this land for a season, yet I can say in truth, that my affections, my heart, and my all are in Zion— I love her trees— I love her springs— I love her rivers— I love her pearling streams— I love her beautiful and soul-charming landscapes, and rolling prairies— I love her dust— I love her inhabitants, and nothing but their salvation and to do the will of our Lord, would persuade me to take my life in my hand, and travel amid death and destruction alone a long and lonesome journey. And O, my everlasting father, grant in the name of Jesus, that I may meet you again on that holy mountain— O that he would deliver her from her enemies— O that the day of her salvation was now come— And O that I with you may yet see her wastes exalted, her ruined places built up, her towers reach to heaven, her streets paved with gold, and finally she purified and sanctified, and bourn triumphant to the bosom of the Father through Christ Jesus our Lord, Amen. God bless you brethren in Christ, is the prayer of your unworthy brother,
Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
[label on drawing]Side View. [p. [1]]
An explanation of the following pattern.
This house

The official name for the sacred edifice in Kirtland, Ohio, later known as the Kirtland temple; also the official name for other planned religious structures in Missouri. JS and the Latter-day Saints also referred to the House of the Lord in Kirtland as “...

View Glossary
for the presidency

The presiding body of the church. From the day of the church’s organization on 6 April 1830, JS and Oliver Cowdery led the church in their capacity as elders. An 11 November 1831 revelation directed that “the duty of the president of the office of the high...

View Glossary
is to be built first in Zion; and is  to be 97 feet long, and 61 feet wide within the walls, and divided  [a]nd arranged in the following manner, viz: No. 1 is to represent a pul [pi]t for the President of the high priesthood

The authority and power held by certain officers in the church. The Book of Mormon referred to the high priesthood as God’s “holy order, which was after the order of his Son,” and indicated that Melchizedek, a biblical figure, was a high priest “after this...

View Glossary
; No. 2. Do. for and his counsellors; No. 2. D[itt]o  [for] the bishop and his counsellors

Initially referred to a bishop’s ecclesiastical jurisdiction, but eventually described the ecclesiastical body comprising the bishop and his assistants, or counselors. John Corrill and Isaac Morley were called as assistants to Bishop Edward Partridge in 1831...

View Glossary
; No. 3. Do. for the high priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

View Glossary
, and No 4. Do. for  [the] elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
. These seats are to occupy 9 by 14 feet, and are elevated as follows,  [v]iz the first, or No 4. one foot; the next, or No. 3. 2 feet, the next, or No. 2 3. feet  the next, or No. 1. 4 feet. The three highest are to have each three Coves or  stands for their respective speakers. The seats on each side are to be occu pied by visiting brethren of the same grade of office, occupying 6 by 14 feet, and  elevated as follows, viz: The first, or No. 4. are to be raised 8 inches, the second, or  [No.] 3. 16 inches; the third, or No. 2. 24 inches; the third <fourth> or No. 4 1. 32. inches. No.s 5, 6, 7, & 8, in  [t]he east end of the inner court represent pulpits to be oocupied by the les ser priesthood

The lower, or lesser, of two divisions of the priesthood. Sometimes called the Levitical priesthood. It was named for Aaron, the brother of Moses, “because it was conferred upon Aaron and his seed” in antiquity. JS and other church leaders taught that the...

View Glossary
, as follows, viz: No. 5. by the presidency

Organized body of leaders over priesthood quorums and various groups of Latter-day Saints. A November 1831 revelation underscored the importance of a president over the high priesthood and the church as a whole. By 1832, JS and two counselors constituted ...

View Glossary
; No. 6. by the priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. In the Book of Mormon, priests were described as those who baptized, administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto the church,” and taught “the things pertaining to the kingdom of God.” A June 1829 revelation directed...

View Glossary
; No. 7 by  the teachers

Generally, one who instructs, but also an ecclesiastical and priesthood office. The Book of Mormon explained that teachers were to be ordained “to preach repentance and remission of sins through Jesus Christ, by the endurance of faith on his name to the end...

View Glossary
, and No. 8 by the deacons

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. The “Articles and Covenants” directed deacons to assist teachers in their duties. Deacons were also to “warn, expound, exhort, and teach and invite all to come unto Christ.” Although deacons did not have the authority...

View Glossary
. The side seats to be occupied by visiting of [fi]cers of the same grade. The pulpits in the east are to be built after the  [sam]e form, and elevated in the same manner as those in the west, all  e off with pannel work in the best workmanlike manner.  No. 9 represents five seats containing 12 by 14 feet, in each corner of the  house, to be occupied by singers, constructed so as to face the respect ive pulpits, and elevated as follows, viz: The seat nearest the pulpit  is to raise rise 6 inches, the next 12 inches, and so on to the last, one rising  6 inches higher than the other. No. 10 represents two rows of pews, one  on each side of the house containing 45 by 14 feet, and divided into  [f]ourteen rows <of seats> each. No. 11 represents two tiers of pews, contain [in]g 25 by 12½ feet each, and each tier divided into fourteen seats each.  N[o.] 12 represents four Aisles, occupying 9 by 14 feet. There may be two   in each aisle, the length of it, that is, 14 feet, one facing west, and the  [other] east. No. 13 represents four fire-places. The chimneys should be con [structe]d in the walls. No. 14 represents two aisles four feet wide, run [ning the] whole length of the inner court from east to west. No. 15  [represent]s four aisles two feet wide between the pulpits. No. 16 represents  [two ve]stries for depositing the sacred furniture of the house.  [No. 17 re]presents stairways and stairs. No. 18 represents four inch  [spac]es marked between the pews, for the purpose of dropping  [a curt]ain or vail, which is to hang in the upper wall, or arch to be  [dropped d]own at pleasure, and divide the house in <to> four parts if  [nece]ssary, the vails crossing at right angles as marked on  plan. No. 19 represents a swing table 2½ feet wide to be raised  [or] let down at pleasure. This table is to hold the bread and wine

Primarily referred to the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper, or Communion, as opposed to other religious sacraments. The articles and covenants of the church directed “that the church meet together often to partake of bread and wine in remembrance of the Lord...

View Glossary
.  [N]o. 20 represents two seats, one to face each pulpit.
Note 1. Observe, that as there are pulpits in each end of the house,  to avoid the necessity of the backs of the congregation being towards the  [s]peaker at any time, the house must be finished with pews in [s]tead of slips. The seats in the pews must be so constructed that  [th]ey can be slipped, or moved from one side of the pew to the other  [a]t pleasure, and then the congregation can without trouble change  their position at any time, and always face the speaker.
Note 2. The pulpit in the west end of the house is to have vails, so that they may  [be] shut out from the view of the congregation whenever necessary: That is, a vail  will hang between the President of the high priest hood and his counsellors,  and the bishop; between the bishop and his counsellors, and the high  priests; between the high priests and elders; between the elders and the con gregation, that is, four vails. N.B. The pulpits in the east are to be  furnished with vails in the same manner.
Note 3. The stairs are to commence from the outer doors, that is, firstly  a broad step, and another at the angle as you ascend. N.B. The two  doors leading into the inner court are to be double pannel, two feet  each, opening four feet, the whole wedth of the aisles.
Note 4. The upper story is to be finished after the same form of the lower one,  and each story must be at least fifteen feet between the floors.
Note 5. There must be hooks and rings to suspend the vails, or curtains with,  so that they can be raised or let down at pleasure. N.B. Each room is to be  finished with an eliptic arch.
Explanation of the Side View.
This view represents nine forty eight light windows above and below, of  7 by 9 glass. The east window below, opposite the vestry, is to be blind.  [T]he sils and lintels are to be hewn stone. The lintels are to extend each  [w]ay a few inches, as represented on the plan. Gothics tops are to set over each  window upon the lintels as represented on the plan. Raise the windows a  propper distance from the foundations, according to judgment.
The foundation is to be rough stone a sufficient highth, and then  four rows of hewn stone as represented on the plan; the remainder of  the walls of brick of the best kind. Raise the ground round the house  as high as the rough wall. And when all the houses are built upon  the squares, the ground will raise rise at an equal distance from  each.
Explanation of the End View. East.
This represents five windows, and two doors. Four of the windows of   same as those in the side. The middle window is to contain 60  [lig]hts of glass besides the side lights, and the top. The doors are  [to] be double pannel, each door to be 2½ feet wide, and to clear  five feet when open. There are to be side lights as represented,  and also gothic tops. The middle window is to be so set that  the light will reflect above and below, as represented on the plan,  where the line is drawn from side to side. The gable end is to be  finished with a fan light as represented on the plan. N.B. Take the  pitch of the roof from the draft.
Note 1. The east doors are to open opposite the 4 feet aisles.
Note 2. There is to be a window as large as necessary, directly over  the east pulpt, to convey the light from the outer court through to  the inner court.
Note 3. There will be no petition in the upper story, there will be a rail [i]ng over the lower petition far enough east to give room for a suffi cient aisle. The east seats in the pulpits east will need a back work suffi ciently high to rest the back.
Explanation of the End View West.
This represents nine windows; eight of them the same form & size  of the side windows, and the middle one like the middle window  in the east end. N.B. There being an error in putting the upper win dows too low, it was thought needless to finish the plan; you will  therefore put the four common windows above, the proper height.  Also a fan light in the gable end.
It will be nesessary to have fourteen pillars for to support  the building. Commence these pillars with rough stone as low in the  surface as the rough foundation. These pillars are to be reared with in the foundation walls. Wood will answer above the first &  second floors; but they must stand directly over each other:  That is, the pillars upon the first floor, must stand over, or upon  those beneath, and so with these those in the upper story.
☞Remarks.— Those patterns previously sent you, per mail, by our brethren,  were incorrect in some respects; being drawn in grate haste. They have  therefore drawn these, which are correct. The form of the city was  also incorrect, being drawn in haste. also We send you annother.  I have found since my arrival, that our brethren here, have spared no  pains nor labor to assist us in Zion in all things, as fast as they had  understanding communicated to them. They have withheld no revela tions, nor precious knowledge of any kind; neither have they failed,  [i]n the recption of our letters containing questions, to answer them  immediately. I have every reason to believe, that we have often lost  valuable information. In short, I may say, that our brethren here have  always had the warmest feelings of friendship and esteem for us, and  as deep an interest for the cause of Zion as ourselves; and even now,  they pray for her deliverance unceasingly, and manifest a love for  her inhabitants, stronger than death! And although it is manifest, that it is wisdom for me to tarry in this land for a season, yet I can say in truth, that my affections,  my heart, and my all are in Zion— I love her trees— I love her springs— I love her rivers— I love her pearling streams— I love her beautiful and soul- charming landscapes, and rolling prairies— I love her dust— I love her inhabitants, and nothing but their salvation and to do the will of our Lord, would  persuade me to take my life in my hand, and travel amid death and destruction alone a long and lonesome journey. And O, my everlasting father, gra[n]t in th[e]  name of Jesus, that I may meet you again on that holy mountain— O that he would deliver her from her enemies— O that the day of her salvation was now come— And O  that I with you may yet see her wastes exalted, her ruined places built up, her towers reach to heaven, her streets paved with gold, and finally she purified and sanc tified, and bourn triumphant to the bosom of the Father through Christ Jesus our Lord, Amen. God bless you brethren in Christ, is the prayer of your unworthy brother,
Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
[label on drawing]Side View. [p. [1]]
Next
In June 1833, the church’s high priesthood presidency in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, Ohio, sent plans to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
church leaders for the projected temple and city of Zion. Revisions were later made, and Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

View Full Bio
redrew both sketches, which were sent to Missouri sometime in September 1833. The revised drawing for the house of the Lord to be built in Zion included Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
’s handwritten explanations of the modifications.
Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

View Full Bio
drafted this revised plat, which was probably carried to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
by messenger sometime after 10 August 1833. The document includes a notation, “Drawn by F. G. Williams.”

Facts