53992723

Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

These things transpired, between the first of July and the middle of November 1833.
The mob made their attack, by tearing down houses and distroying property. A printing office

JS revelations, dated 20 July and 1 Aug. 1831, directed establishment of LDS church’s first printing office in Independence, Missouri. Dedicated by Bishop Edward Partridge, 29 May 1832. Located on Lot 76, on Liberty Street just south of courthouse square....

More Info
was torn down, the press broken, the type scattered through the streets; all the book work, papers, and other materials that were in the office were distroyed; in all amounting to several thousand dollars. A store was broken open, the goods thrown into the street and trampled under foot, * A prosecution was entered against one of the men, who was taken in the very act of taking the goods and trampling them underfoot. The writ was obtained at the office of a man by the name of Western Samuel Weston

24 Oct. 1783–14 Dec. 1846. Blacksmith, joiner, carpenter. Born in Belfast, Ireland. Moved to Ulverston, Lancashire, England, by 1812. Married Margaret Cleminson Gibson, 28 June 1812, in Ulverston. Joined British navy, 1812; captured by Americans and defected...

View Full Bio
, who was a justice of the peace, or called so. When the man was brought for trial, though it was proven that he was taken in the very act of distroying the goods, he was acquitted, and no cause of action was found; but shortly afterwards, there was a writ issued from the same office, against those who prosecuted the said Richard McCarty

Ca. 1805–after 1840. Served as trustee for incorporation of Independence, Jackson Co., Missouri, May 1832. Member of mob that vandalized Gilbert, Whitney & Co. store, 1 Nov. 1833, at Independence. Lived in Jackson Co., 1840.

View Full Bio
, for distroying the goods, for fals imprisonment, and they were holden to bail for their appearance at the county court, and for want of bail, they were thrown into jail. This is a correct sample of the way the laws were administered in Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
.
Before this banditta commenced the distruction of property, they appointed committees to go and wait on the saints, and order them out of the county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
under pain of death. The object of those warnings was, to make them go and leave all their property as prey to the mob. At which all the authorities of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, from the governor

14 Jan. 1790–25 July 1844. Farmer, tavern owner, businessman, investor, lawyer, politician. Born near Greenville, Greenville District, South Carolina. Son of Joseph Dunklin Jr. and Sarah Margaret Sullivan. Moved to what became Caldwell Co., Kentucky, 1806...

View Full Bio
down, winked, as will appear hereafter. While those committies were threatning the saints with death, if they did not leave the county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
forthwith, and leave all their property as a prey to them, they kept the publick papers teaming with lies, and they found many in the country , ready to aid them in their abomination, by giving circulations to their lies and slanders. This I must say, to the shame [p. 2[a]]
These things tra[n]spired, between the first of  July and the middle of November 1833.
The mob made their attack, by tearing  down houses and distroying property. A printing office

JS revelations, dated 20 July and 1 Aug. 1831, directed establishment of LDS church’s first printing office in Independence, Missouri. Dedicated by Bishop Edward Partridge, 29 May 1832. Located on Lot 76, on Liberty Street just south of courthouse square....

More Info
 was torn down, the press broken, the type scattered through  the streets; all the book work, papers, and other materials  that were in the office were distroyed; in all amounting  to several thousand dollars. A store was broken open,  the goods thrown into the street and trampled under foot,  * A prosecution was entered the against one of the men, who  was taken in the very act of taking the goods and trampli ng them underfoot. The writ was obtained at the office  of a man by the name of Western [Samuel Weston]

24 Oct. 1783–14 Dec. 1846. Blacksmith, joiner, carpenter. Born in Belfast, Ireland. Moved to Ulverston, Lancashire, England, by 1812. Married Margaret Cleminson Gibson, 28 June 1812, in Ulverston. Joined British navy, 1812; captured by Americans and defected...

View Full Bio
, who was a justice of the  peace, or called so. When the man was brought for trial,  though it was proven that he was taken in the very  act of distroying the goods, he was acquitted, and no  cause of action was found; but shortly afterwards, there  was a writ issued from the same office, against those who  prosecuted the said [Richard] McCarty

Ca. 1805–after 1840. Served as trustee for incorporation of Independence, Jackson Co., Missouri, May 1832. Member of mob that vandalized Gilbert, Whitney & Co. store, 1 Nov. 1833, at Independence. Lived in Jackson Co., 1840.

View Full Bio
, for distroying the goods,  and they were for fals imprisonment, and they were holden  to bail for their appearance at the county court, and  for want of bail, they were thrown into jail. This is  a correct sample of the way the laws were administe red in Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
.
Before this banditta commenced the dis truction of property, they appointed committees to  go and wait on the saints, and order them out of  the county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
under pain of death. The object of those  warnings were <was,> to make them go and leave all their  property as prey to the mob. At which all the authorities  of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, from the governor

14 Jan. 1790–25 July 1844. Farmer, tavern owner, businessman, investor, lawyer, politician. Born near Greenville, Greenville District, South Carolina. Son of Joseph Dunklin Jr. and Sarah Margaret Sullivan. Moved to what became Caldwell Co., Kentucky, 1806...

View Full Bio
down, winked, as will  appear hereafter. While those committies were threatning  the saints with death, if they did not leave the county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
 forthwith, and leave all their property as a prey to  them, they kept the publick papers teaming with  lies, and they found <many in the country> a large majority of all the reli geous papers in the country, and a great number of  the political ones, ready to aid them in their abo mination, by giving f ready circulations to their lies  and slanders. This I I must say, to the shame [p. 2[a]]
PreviousNext
Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), ca. Sept. 1838–ca. Oct. 1839; handwriting of Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
, Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

View Full Bio
, George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

View Full Bio
, David Lewis

10 Apr. 1814–2 Sept. 1855. Cooper, farmer, photographer. Born in Warren Co. (later in Simpson Co.), Kentucky. Son of Neriah Lewis and Mary Morse. Married Duritha Trail, 23 Nov. 1834. Baptized into LDS church, 24 Mar. 1835. Ordained an elder, 1835. Moved to...

View Full Bio
, and two unidentified scribes; sixty-four leaves, forty-nine pages of text with fifteen blank pages; JS Collection, CHL.

Facts