House of the Lord 

Summary

The official name for the sacred edifice in Kirtland, Ohio, later known as the Kirtland temple; also the official name for other planned religious structures in Missouri.1 JS and the Latter-day Saints also referred to the House of the Lord in Kirtland as “the Chapel” and, in rare instances, “the temple.”2 Revelations relating to its construction made clear that it would serve as a place of religious instruction and a place where God would manifest himself to faithful Latter-day Saints and endow his servants “with power from on high.”3 The building became a focal point for the religious community, providing a place for church meetings, office space for church leaders, rooms for schools, and sacred space for ordinances and revelation.4 The phrase “House of the Lord” was intended to be used more widely than just in Kirtland, however.5 In June 1833, JS and his counselors in the church presidency directed that twenty-four temples were to be built in Independence, Missouri, eighteen of which would bear proper names beginning with “House of the Lord.”6 The name “House of the Lord” was also applied to a planned temple in Far West, Missouri, and the temple in Nauvoo, Illinois.7 See also “Temple.”

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