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“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

one day some sixty or seventy of them assembled, rode off a few miles east, and stopped a few waggons, which were moving to Clay co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, and turned them back. It was manifested from their threatnings and actions, that they were determined, to fall upon the saints and drive them out of the county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, if they could. It was equally manifest, that the saints were disposed to defend themselves against mobs, even to the sheding of blood.
At that time it was seen that if something was not done to stop it, blood would be shed; (for the mob party were resolved on driving, and the saints were determined not to be driven by them, without first trying their strength;) Wherefore the most intelligent, and respectable citizens of the county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, who had always appeared friendly to the saints, held a meeting, in which they appointed a committee, and also requested the saints to appoint a committee, to meet their committee near Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, on a day appointed to confer with each other; and see if something could not be done, to evade the storm, which appeared to be fast gathering.
The committee met at the appointed time, and a proposition was made by the citizen’s committee, to the other, to this effect.96

The meeting was held at Liberty, Clay County, on 29 June 1836. The document setting forth the concerns of the Clay County citizens can be found in “Public Meeting,” LDS Messenger and Advocate, Aug. 1836, 2:353–355.  


That whereas, the people of Clay co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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had kindly received the saints in their distress, when it was expected, that they would soon return to Jackson co.

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, and not think of making Clay co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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a permanent home: and whereas, almost three years had passed away since, and the prospect of their returning to Jackson co.

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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was less at that time than it was years before;97

Instead of the passage from “almost three years” to this point, the Partridge manuscript has “whereas the prospect of returning to Jackson Co. was small at that present time.”  


and that a portion of the citizens of Clay co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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were dissatisfied, to have them remain where they were any longer. Therefore the committee in behalf of the citizens requested, that they (the saints) should look themselves a new location, either in some unsettled part of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, or othrewise go out of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, as suited them best. The committee disclaimed all right, to request any such thing; they said, that they knew very well, that the saints had just as good a right there, as themselves, but they thought that considering the opposition that there was to them it would be better for them, to go where they could be more by themselves; and they even reccommended their gathering together, and living altogether by themselves. They further said, that if they would consent to go, and seek a new location, they would send a committee with them, who was acquainted with the country, who would pilot them, in looking it out. However a location had already been selected, and about sixteen hundred acres of land purchased but a short time previous; and they were willing to go, and some of them were making preparations to move there soon before the meeting of the committee:98

Edward Partridge, Isaac Morley, John Corrill, and William W. Phelps began searching for new locations for Latter-day Saint settlement in May 1836. They filed claims for twenty eighty-acre parcels of land northeast of Clay County in the vicinity of Shoal Creek and soon afterward began preparations for a settlement there. (Partridge, Journal, May–July 1836; William W. Phelps et al., Liberty, MO, to Daniel Dunklin, 7 July 1836, copy, William W. Phelps, Collection of Missouri Documents, CHL.)  


Wherefore the committee, on the part of the church, consented to the proposition made to them;99

The Latter-day Saints’ agreement to the citizens’ requests, as well as the resolutions offered in response by the Clay County representatives, can be found in “Public Meeting,” LDS Messenger and Advocate, Aug. 1836, 2:359–361.  


and then all parted with apparent good feelings.— Soon afterwards three, on the part of the church, and two pilots, started to view the country;100

Elisha Cameron and Cornelius Gilliam served as guides for Edward Partridge, William W. Phelps, and John Whitmer during a nine-day tour of northwest Missouri beginning 13 July 1836. (Edward Partridge, Miscellaneous Papers, CHL; Parkin, “History of the Latter-day Saints in Clay County,” 268.)  


they travelled a number of days, in the new settlements, towards the N. W. corner of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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; and they finally concluded, that the place previously selected, now known as Caldwell Co.

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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should be the place, where they would settle; there being but a few inhabitants, in a district of country large enough for a county; and they, in general, willing to sell out.101

The phrase “and they, in general, willing to sell out” does not appear in the Partridge manuscript.  


Upon these movements the mob spirit in Clay Co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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measurably subsided, and the saints prepared, and moved to their new settlement, as fast as their circumstances would permit; pleased with the idea of settling together by themselves.102

Edward Partridge’s manuscript concludes at this point with his inscription, “Here is the end of what E. P. has written.”  


[p. 51]
one day some sixty or seventy of them  assembled, rode off a few miles east,  and stopped a few waggons, which were  moving to Clay co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
, and turned them  back. It was manifested from their  threatnings and actions, that they were  determined, to fall upon the saints and  drive them out of the county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, if they  could. It was equally manifest, that  the saints were disposed to defend  themselves against mobs, even to the  sheding of blood.
At that time it was seen that if  something was not done to stop it,  blood would be shed; (for the mob par ty were resolved on driving, and the  saints were determined not to be driv en by them, without first trying their  strength;) Wherefore the most intelli gent, and respectable citizens of the  county

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
, who had always appeared  friendly to the saints, held a meeting, in  which they appointed a committee, and  also requested the saints to appoint a  committee, to meet their committee  near Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, on a day appointed to  confer with each other; and see if  something could not be done, to evade  the storm, which appeared to be fast  gathering.
The committee met at the appointed  time, and a proposition was made by  the citizen’s committee, to the other,  to this effect.96

The meeting was held at Liberty, Clay County, on 29 June 1836. The document setting forth the concerns of the Clay County citizens can be found in “Public Meeting,” LDS Messenger and Advocate, Aug. 1836, 2:353–355.  


That whereas, the people of Clay co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
 had kindly received the saints in their  distress, when it was expected, that  they would soon return to Jackson co.

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
,  and not think of making Clay co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
a  permanent home: and whereas, almost  three years had passed away since,  and the prospect of their returning to  Jackson co.

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
was less at that time than  it was years before;97

Instead of the passage from “almost three years” to this point, the Partridge manuscript has “whereas the prospect of returning to Jackson Co. was small at that present time.”  


and that a portion  of the citizens of Clay co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
were dis satisfied, to have them remain where  they were any longer. Therefore the  committee in behalf of the citizens  requested, that they (the sain[t]s) should  look themselves a new location, either  in some unsettled part of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, or  othrewise go out of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, as suited  them best. The committee disclaimed  all right, to request any such thing; they  said, that they knew very well, that the  saints had just as good a right there, as  themselves, but they thought that consid ering the opposition that there was to  them it would be better for them,  to go where they could be more by  themselves; and they even reccommen ded their gathering together, and living  altogether by themselves. They fur ther said, that if they would consent to  go, and seek a new location, they would  send a committee with them, who was  acquainted with the country, who would  pilot them, in looking it out. How ever a location had already been selected,  and about sixteen hundred acres of land  purchased but a short time previous; and  they were willing to go, and some of them  were making preparations to move there  soon before the meeting of the commit tee:98

Edward Partridge, Isaac Morley, John Corrill, and William W. Phelps began searching for new locations for Latter-day Saint settlement in May 1836. They filed claims for twenty eighty-acre parcels of land northeast of Clay County in the vicinity of Shoal Creek and soon afterward began preparations for a settlement there. (Partridge, Journal, May–July 1836; William W. Phelps et al., Liberty, MO, to Daniel Dunklin, 7 July 1836, copy, William W. Phelps, Collection of Missouri Documents, CHL.)  


Wherefore the committee, on the  part of the church, consented to the  proposition made to them;99

The Latter-day Saints’ agreement to the citizens’ requests, as well as the resolutions offered in response by the Clay County representatives, can be found in “Public Meeting,” LDS Messenger and Advocate, Aug. 1836, 2:359–361.  


and then all  parted with apparent good feelings.—  Soon afterwards three, on the part of the  church, and two pilots, started to view  the country;100

Elisha Cameron and Cornelius Gilliam served as guides for Edward Partridge, William W. Phelps, and John Whitmer during a nine-day tour of northwest Missouri beginning 13 July 1836. (Edward Partridge, Miscellaneous Papers, CHL; Parkin, “History of the Latter-day Saints in Clay County,” 268.)  


they travelled a number of  days, in the new settlements, towards  the N. W. corner of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
; and  they finally concluded, that the place  previously selected, now known as Cal dwell Co.

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
should be the place, where  they would settle; there being but a few  inhabitants, in a district of country large  enough for a county; and they, in gen eral, willing to sell out.101

The phrase “and they, in general, willing to sell out” does not appear in the Partridge manuscript.  


Upon these movements the mob spirit  in Clay Co.

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
measurably subsided, and  the saints prepared, and moved to their  new settlement, as fast as their circum stances would permit; pleased with the  idea of settling together by themselves.102

Edward Partridge’s manuscript concludes at this point with his inscription, “Here is the end of what E. P. has written.”  


[p. 51]
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“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
,” in Times and Seasons (Commerce/Nauvoo, IL), vol. 1, nos. 2–12: Dec. 1839, pp. 17–20; Jan. 1840, pp. 33–36; Feb. 1840, pp. 49–51; Mar. 1840, pp. 65–66; Apr. 1840, pp. 81–82; May 1840, pp. 97–99; June 1840, pp. 113–116; July 1840, pp. 129–131; Aug. 1840, pp. 145–150; Sept. 1840, pp. 161–165; Oct. 1840, pp. 177, 184–185; edited by Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

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and Don Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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. The copy used for transcription is currently part of a bound volume held at CHL; includes light marginalia and archival marking.
Each segment in the eleven-part series begins on the first page of its respective number of the Times and Seasons. Each issue comprises eight leaves (sixteen pages) that measure 8⅝ x 5¼ inches (22 x 13 cm). The text on each page is set in two columns. At some point, the editors of the Times and Seasons reset and reprinted the December 1839 and January 1840 issues of the Times and Seasons; based on textual analysis, the version used for transcription appears to be the earlier typesetting of both.1

See Crawley, Descriptive Bibliography, 1:94–95.  


It is unknown how long this volume has been in church custody.

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