43990549

History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

whole camp was under motion, consisting of 515 souls, 249 males, July 6 266 females, 27 Tents; 59 waggons; 97 horses, 22 oxen, 69 cows, and 1 Bull,— Jonathan dunham

14 Jan. 1800–28 July 1845. Soldier, police captain. Born in Paris, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Jonathan Dunham. Married Mary Kendall. Moved to Rushford, Allegany Co., New York, by 1830. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, by 1836. Served mission...

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was engineer. The camp traveled to chester 7. miles the first day, and pitched their tents in form of a hollow square, Camp.— within a hollow square formed by their waggons.—

6 July 1838 • Friday

This day I received a letter from Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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and Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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dated at Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, expisive [expressive] of their good feelings, firmness in the faith, prosperity &c, also another Letter from my brother

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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, as follows;
Don C. Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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’s Letter. “Brother Joseph; “Nine miles from Terra haute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

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Indiana
I sit down to inform you of our situation at the present time. I started from Norton

Area first settled, 1814. Formed from Wolf Creek Township, 1818. Reported location of “great Mormon excitement,” 1832–1838. Population in 1830 about 650. Primarily populated by immigrants from New England states. Increased German Pennsylvanian immigration...

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, Ohio, the 7th. of May, in company with Father

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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, William [Smith]

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

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, [Wilkins] Jenkins Salisbury

6 Jan. 1809–28 Oct. 1853. Lawyer, blacksmith. Born at Rushville, Yates Co., New York. Son of Gideon Salisbury and Elizabeth Shields. Baptized into LDS church in New York. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1831. Married JS’s sister Katharine Smith, 8...

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, Wm.Mc Cleary

9 Oct. 1793–ca. 1847. Born at Rupert, Bennington Co., Vermont. Married Sophronia Smith Stoddard, 11 Feb. 1838, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained an elder in LDS church by Reuben Hedlock, 26 Feb. 1838, at Kirtland. Left Ohio for Far West, Caldwell Co...

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, and Lewis Robbins and families, also sister Singly [Margaret Leasure Singley]

22 Sept. 1791–4 Oct. 1874. Born at Unity, Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of John Leasure (Lasure) and Sarah Crow. Married Nicholas Singley Sr. of Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania. Moved to Portage, Portage Co., Ohio, by June 1830. Baptized into LDS church...

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.
We started with 15 horses, 7 waggons, and two cows. We have left two horses by the way, sick, and a third horse (as it were our dependence) was taken lame last evening, and is not able to travel, and we have stopped to Doctor him. We were disappointed on every hand, before we started in getting money. We got no assistance whatever, only as we have taken in Sister Singly

22 Sept. 1791–4 Oct. 1874. Born at Unity, Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of John Leasure (Lasure) and Sarah Crow. Married Nicholas Singley Sr. of Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania. Moved to Portage, Portage Co., Ohio, by June 1830. Baptized into LDS church...

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, and she has assisted us as far as her means extends. We had, when we started $75. in money. We sold the two cows for thirteen dollars and fifty cents per cow. We have sold of your Goods to the amount of $45.74 and now we have only $25. to carry 28 souls and 13 horses 500 miles. We have lived very close, and camped out at nights, notwithstanding the rain and cold, and my babe only two weeks old when we started. Agness [Agnes Coolbrith Smith]

11 July 1811–26 Dec. 1876. Born at Scarborough, Cumberland Co., Maine. Daughter of Joseph Coolbrith and Mary Hasty Foss. Moved to Boston, by 1832. Baptized into LDS church, 1832, at Boston. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, summer 1833. Married Don Carlos...

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is very feeble: Father

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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and Mother

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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are not well, and very much fatigued; Mother

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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has a severe cold, and in fact, it is nothing but the prayer of faith and the power of God that will sustain them. and bring them through. Our Carriage is good and I think we shall be brought through. I leave it with you and Hyrum [Smith]

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
to devise some way to assist us to some more expence money. We have had unaccountable bad roads, had our horses down in the mud, and broke one waggon tongue and thills, and broke down the carriage twice, and yet we are all alive and encamped on a dry place for almost the first time. Poverty is a heavy load but we are all obliged to welter under it. It is now dark and I close. May the Lord bless you all and bring us together is my prayer Amen.— All the arrangements that Bro Hyrum

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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left for getting money failed; They did not gain us one cent. Don. Carlos Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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7–8 July 1838 • Saturday–Sunday

Camp. 7 Saturday 7th The Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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camp, moved forward to Aurrora 13 miles and Sunday 8 encamped for the Sabbath. Sunday 8th. there was some sickness in the camp. They held a public meeting and the Leaders informed them that the destroyer was in their midst and some would fall victims unless they adhered strictly to the covenant they had made, laid aside all covetousness, and lived by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord. They were threatened, this night, with tar and feathers from the mob, of the place; and were obliged to keep a close watch to keep their horses from being stolen by the mob, who threw a club and hit Elder Tyler on the breast.

8 July 1838 • Sunday

Meeting at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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The three Revelations, which I received January 12th 1838, the day I left Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, were read in the public congregation at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, [p. 801]
whole camp was under motion, consisting of 529 <515> souls, 269 249 males,  <July 6> 266 females, 27 Tents; 59 waggons; 97 horses, 22 oxen, 69 cows, and 1  Bull,— Jonathan dunham

14 Jan. 1800–28 July 1845. Soldier, police captain. Born in Paris, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Jonathan Dunham. Married Mary Kendall. Moved to Rushford, Allegany Co., New York, by 1830. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, by 1836. Served mission...

View Full Bio
was engineer. The camp traveled to chester  7. miles the first day, and pitched their tents in form of a hollow square,  <Camp.—> within a hollow square formed by their waggons.—

6 July 1838 • Friday

This day I received a letter from Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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and Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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dated  at Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, expisive [expressive] of their good feelings, firmness in the faith,  prosperity &c, also another Letter from my brother

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

View Full Bio
, as follows;
<Don C. Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

View Full Bio
’s  Letter.> “Brother Joseph; “Nine miles from Terra haute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

More Info
Indiana
I sit down to inform you of our situation at the present time. I started  from Norton

Area first settled, 1814. Formed from Wolf Creek Township, 1818. Reported location of “great Mormon excitement,” 1832–1838. Population in 1830 about 650. Primarily populated by immigrants from New England states. Increased German Pennsylvanian immigration...

More Info
, Ohio, the 7th. of May, in company with Father

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

View Full Bio
, William [Smith]

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

View Full Bio
, [Wilkins] Jenkins  Salisbury

6 Jan. 1809–28 Oct. 1853. Lawyer, blacksmith. Born at Rushville, Yates Co., New York. Son of Gideon Salisbury and Elizabeth Shields. Baptized into LDS church in New York. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1831. Married JS’s sister Katharine Smith, 8...

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, Wm.Mc Cl[e]ary

9 Oct. 1793–ca. 1847. Born at Rupert, Bennington Co., Vermont. Married Sophronia Smith Stoddard, 11 Feb. 1838, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained an elder in LDS church by Reuben Hedlock, 26 Feb. 1838, at Kirtland. Left Ohio for Far West, Caldwell Co...

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, and Lewis Rob[b]ins and family families, also sister Singly [Margaret Leasure Singley]

22 Sept. 1791–4 Oct. 1874. Born at Unity, Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of John Leasure (Lasure) and Sarah Crow. Married Nicholas Singley Sr. of Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania. Moved to Portage, Portage Co., Ohio, by June 1830. Baptized into LDS church...

View Full Bio
.
We started with 15 horses, 7 waggons, and two cows. We have left two  horses by the way, sick, and a third horse (as it were our dependence) was  taken lame last evening, and is not able to travel, and we have  stopped to Doctor him. We were disappointed on every hand, before we  started in getting money. We got no assistance whatever, only as we have  taken in Sister Singly

22 Sept. 1791–4 Oct. 1874. Born at Unity, Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of John Leasure (Lasure) and Sarah Crow. Married Nicholas Singley Sr. of Lehigh Co., Pennsylvania. Moved to Portage, Portage Co., Ohio, by June 1830. Baptized into LDS church...

View Full Bio
, and she has assisted us as far as her means extends.  We had, when we started $75. in money. We sold the two cows for thir teen dollars and fifty cents per cow. We have sold of your Goods to the  amount of $45.74 and now we have only $25. to carry 28 souls and  13 horses 500 miles. We have lived very close, and camped out  a[t] nights, notwithstanding the rain and cold, and my babe only  two weeks old when we started. Agness [Agnes Coolbrith Smith]

11 July 1811–26 Dec. 1876. Born at Scarborough, Cumberland Co., Maine. Daughter of Joseph Coolbrith and Mary Hasty Foss. Moved to Boston, by 1832. Baptized into LDS church, 1832, at Boston. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, summer 1833. Married Don Carlos...

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is very feeble: Father

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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and Mother

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

View Full Bio
 are not well, and very much fatigued; Mother

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

View Full Bio
has a severe cold, and  in fact, it is nothing but the prayer of faith and the power of God  that will sustain them. and bring them through. Our Carriage is good  and I think we shall be brought through. I leave it with you and  Hyrum [Smith]

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
to devise some way to assist us to some more expence money.  We have had unaccountable bad roads, had our horses down in  the mud, and broke one waggon tongue and thills, and broke  down the carriage twice, and yet we are all alive and encamped  on a dry place for almost the first time. Poverty is a heavy load  but we are all obliged to welter under it. It is now dark and I  close. May the Lord bless you all and bring us together is my prayer  Amen.— All the arrangements that Bro Hyrum

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
left for getting  money failed; They did not gain us one cent. Don. C[arlos] Smith

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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7–8 July 1838 • Saturday–Sunday

<Camp. 7> Saturday 7th The Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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camp, moved forward to Aurrora 13 miles and  <Sunday 8> encamped for the Sabbath. Sunday 8th. there was some sickness in the camp.  They had held a public meeting and the Leaders informed them that the de stroyer was in their midst and some would fall victims unless  they adhered strictly to the covenant they had made, laid aside  all covetousness, and lived by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth  of the Lord. They were threatened, this night, with tar and feathers from  the mob, of the place; and were obliged to keep a close watch to keep  their horses from being stolen by the mob, who threw a club and hit  Elder Tyler on the breast.

8 July 1838 • Sunday

<Meeting at  Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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> The three Revelations, which I received January  12th 1838, the day I left Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, were read in the public congregation at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, [p. 801]
PreviousNext
This document, volume B-1, is the second of the six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over the span of seventeen years, 1838 to 1856. The narrative in volume B-1 begins with the entry for 1 September 1834, just after the conclusion of the Camp of Israel (later called Zion’s Camp), and continues to 2 November 1838, when JS was interned as a prisoner of war at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri. For a fuller discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to the history.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, serving as JS’s “private secretary and historian,” completed the account of JS’s history contained in volume A-1 in August 1843. It covered the period from JS’s birth in 1805 through the aftermath of the Camp of Israel in August 1834. When work resumed on the history on 1 October 1843, Richards started a new volume, eventually designated B-1.
At the time of JS’s death in June 1844, the account had been advanced to 5 August 1838, on page 812 of volume B-1. Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s poor health led to the curtailment of work on B-1 for several months, until 11 December 1844. On that date, Richards and William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, assisted by Thomas Bullock, resumed gathering the records and reports needed to draft the history. Richards then composed and drafted roughed-out notes while Thomas Bullock compiled the text of the history and inscribed it in B-1. They completed their work on the volume on or about 24 February 1845. Richards, Willmer Benson, and Jonathan Grimshaw later added ten pages of “Addenda,” which provided notes, extensive revisions, or additional text to be inserted in the original manuscript where indicated.
Though JS did not dictate or revise any of the text recorded in B-1, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock chose to maintain the first-person, chronological narrative format established in A-1 as if JS were the author. They drew from a variety of primary and secondary sources including JS’s diaries and letters, minutes of meetings, the first edition of the Doctrine and Covenants, church and other periodicals, reports of JS’s discourses, and the reminiscences and recollections of church members. As was the case with A-1, after JS’s death, Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others modified and corrected the manuscript as they reviewed material before its eventual publication.
Beginning in March 1842 the church’s Nauvoo periodical, the Times and Seasons, began publishing the narrative as the “History of Joseph Smith.” It was also published in England in the church periodical the Millennial Star beginning in June 1842. Once a press was established in Utah and the Deseret News began publication, the “History of Joseph Smith” once more appeared in print in serialized form. Beginning with the November 1851 issue, the narrative picked up where the Times and Seasons had left off over five years earlier.
The narrative recorded in B-1 continued the story of JS’s life as the prophet and president of the church he labored to establish. The account encompasses significant developments in the church’s two centers at that time—Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, and northwest Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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—during a four-year-span. Critical events included the organization of the Quorums of the Twelve Apostles and the Seventy, the dedication of the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio, the establishment of the Kirtland Safety Society, dissension and apostasy in Kirtland and Missouri, the first mission to England, JS’s flight from Kirtland to Missouri in the winter of 1838, the Saints’ exodus from Kirtland later that year, the disciplining of the Missouri presidency, and the outbreak of the Missouri War and arrest of JS. Thus, B-1 provides substantial detail regarding a significant period of church expansion and transition as well as travail.

Facts