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History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

December 1 for such individuals if the charges are true, ought to be made an example of, and not be suffered to run at large. We have been informed that some of them have been talking of moving into this place; but we would here inform them that persons whose conduct has exposed them to the just censure of an indignant public, can have no fellowship amongst us, as we cannot and will not, countenance rogues, thieves, and scoundrels, knowingly; and we hereby warn them that the law will be as rigorously enforced against them in this place as in any other, as we consider such characters as a curse to society, whose pestilential breath withers the morals, and blasts the fame and reputation of any people among whom they may sojourn. There is no poison that is and ought to be despised more than the thief, by any respectable community; yet more especially ought such persons to be abhorred who have taken upon them the name of Christ, and thus with the pretext of religion, and garb of sanctity, cloak their nefarious practices. We have been told that some individual or individuals, have, under false pretences, been wishing to palm their wicked and devilish principles upon the authorities of the Church, stating that it was part and parcel of the gospel which God had revealed, and that it is one of the mysteries which the initiated only are acquainted with. We know not how to express our abhorrence at such an idea, and can only say that it is engendered in hell, founded in falsehood, and is the offspring of the devil; that it is at variance with every principle of righteousness, and truth; and will damn all that are connected with it; for all mysteries are only such to the ignorant, and vanish as soon as men have sufficient intelligence to comprehend them. and there are no mysteries connected with godliness, and our holy religion, but what are pure, innocent, virtuous, just and righteous; if this is a mystery, it is the “mystery of iniquity.” We are at a loss to know who could be vile enough to propogate such base and unfounded statements, and we would say to the church, beware of such men! set them down as the worst of scoundrels; and reject their foul insinuations with that indignation and disgust, that such unhallowed and vile insinuations deserve; for such men are either avowed apostates, or on the eve of apostacy, or have only taken the name of religion to cloak their hypocrisy; we fear the latter, in some instances, is the case, and that Mississippi

Principal U.S. river running southward from Itasca Lake, Minnesota, to Gulf of Mexico. Covered 3,160-mile course, 1839 (now about 2,350 miles). Drains about 1,100,000 square miles. Steamboat travel on Mississippi very important in 1830s and 1840s for shipping...

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scoundrels palm themselves upon us to cover their guilt. We further call upon the church to bring all such characters before the authorities, that they may be tried, and dealt with according to the law of God, and delivered up unto the laws of the land. It is scarcely possible that any virtuous man could be made to believe any such statements however ignorant; yet lest through false pretences the innocent might be drawn into a snare, we would quote the following from the book of Doctrine and Covenants: Section 13. Paragraph 22. “And if any man or woman shall rob, he or she shall be delivered up unto the law of the land. And if he or she shall steal he or she shall be delivered up unto the law of the land.” Again Section 13. Paragraph 2 “Thou shalt not steal and he that stealeth [p. 1257]
<December 1> for such individuals if the charges are true, ought to be made an example of, and  not be suffered to run at large. We have been informed that some of them have  been talking of moving into this place; but we would here inform them that persons  whose conduct has exposed them to the just censure of an indignant public,  can have no fellowship amongst us, as we cannot and will not, countenance  rogues, thieves, and scoundrels, knowingly; and we hereby warn them that the law  will be as rigorously enforced against them in this place as in any other, as we  consider such characters as a curse to society, whose pestilential breath withers  the morals, and blasts the fame and reputation of any people among whom they  may sojourn. There is no poison that is and ought to be despised more than  the thief, by any respectable community; yet more especially ought such persons  to be abhorred who have taken upon them the name of Christ, and thus with  the pretext of religion, and garb of sanctity, cloak their nefarious practices.  We have been told that some individual or individuals, have, under false  pretences, been wishing to palm their wicked and devilish principles upon  the authorities of the Church, stating that it was part and parcel of the  gospel which God had revealed, and that it is one of the mysteries which the  initiated only are acquainted with. We know not how to express  our abhorrence at such an idea, and can only say that it is engendered in  hell, founded in falsehood, and is the offspring of the devil; that it is at  variance with every principle of righteousness, and truth; and will damn  all that are connected with it; for all mysteries are only such to the  ignorant, and vanish as soon as men have sufficient intelligence to  comprehend them. and there are no mysteries connected with godliness,  and our holy religion, but what are pure, innocent, virtuous, just and  righteous; if this is a mystery, it is the “mystery of iniquity.” We are at  a loss to know who could be vile enough to propogate such base and  unfounded statements, and we would say to the church, beware of such  men! set them down as the worst of scoundrels; and reject their foul  insinuations with that indignation and disgust, that such unhallowed and  vile insinuations deserve; for such men are either avowed apostates, or on the  eve of apostacy, or have only taken the name of religion to cloak their  hypocrisy; we fear the latter, in some instances, is the case, and that Mississippi

Principal U.S. river running southward from Itasca Lake, Minnesota, to Gulf of Mexico. Covered 3,160-mile course, 1839 (now about 2,350 miles). Drains about 1,100,000 square miles. Steamboat travel on Mississippi very important in 1830s and 1840s for shipping...

More Info
 scoundrels palm themselves upon us to cover their guilt. We further call upon  the church to bring all such characters before the authorities, that they may  be tried, and dealt with according to the law of God, and delivered up unto  the laws of the land. It is scarcely possible that any virtuous man  could be made to believe any such statements however ignorant; yet lest  through false pretences the innocent might be drawn into a snare, we  would quote the following from the book of Doctrine and Covenants:  Section 13. Paragraph 22. “And if any man or woman shall rob, he or she  shall be delivered up unto the law of the land. And if he or she shall  steal he or she shall be delivered up unto the law of the land.” Again  Section 13. Paragraph 2 “Thou shalt not steal and he that stealeth [p. 1257]
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This document, volume C-1, is the third of six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over an eighteen-year span from 1838 to 1856 and covers the period from 23 December 1805 to 8 August 1844. The narrative in this volume commences on 2 November 1838 with JS and other church leaders being held prisoner by the “Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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’s forces” at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri, and concludes with the death of Bishop Vinson Knight

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

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at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, on 31 July 1842. For a more complete discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to this history.
Volume C-1 was created beginning on or just after 24 February 1845 and its narrative completed on 3 May although work continued on the volume through 3 July of that year (Richards, Journal, 24 and 28 Feb. 1845; Historian’s Office, Journal, 3 May 1845; 3 and 4 July 1845). It is in the handwriting of Thomas Bullock and contains 512 pages of primary text, plus 24 pages of addenda. Additional addenda for this volume were created at a later date in a separate volume, and will appear in this collection as a separate document. Compilers Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock drew heavily from JS’s letters, discourses, and diary entries; meeting minutes; church and other periodicals and journals; and reminiscences, recollections, and letters of church members and other contacts. At JS’s behest, they had maintained the first-person, chronological-narrative format established in previous volumes, as if JS were the author. Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others reviewed and modified the manuscript prior to its eventual publication in the Salt Lake City newspaper Deseret News.
The historical narrative recorded in volume C-1 continued the account of JS’s life as prophet and president of the church. Critical events occurring within the forty-five-month period of this volume include the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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Mormon War; subsequent legal trials of church leaders; expulsion of the Saints from Missouri; missionary efforts in England by the Twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

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and others; attempts by JS to obtain federal redress for the Missouri depredations; publication of the LDS Millennial Star in England; the migration of English converts to America; missionary efforts in other nations; the death of church patriarch Joseph Smith Sr.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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; the establishment of the Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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city charter; the commencement of construction of the Nauvoo temple

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

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; the Wisconsin “pinery”

Also known as pinery. Area near Black River where lumbering operation was established to provide timber for construction of Nauvoo temple, Nauvoo House, and other public buildings. Four mills established on Black River, ca. Sept. 1841: three near Black River...

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expedition that facilitated temple construction; the introduction of the doctrine of proxy baptism for deceased persons; the dedicatory prayer by Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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on the Mount of Olives in Palestine; publication of the “Book of Abraham” in the Nauvoo Times and Seasons; publication of the JS history often referred to as the “Wentworth letter;” the organization of the Female Relief Society of Nauvoo; and the inception of Nauvoo-era temple endowment ceremonies.

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