43990773

History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

January 21 in the Store

Completed 1841. Opened for business, 5 Jan. 1842. Owned by JS, but managed mostly by others, after 1842. First floor housed JS’s general store and counting room, where tithing was received and recorded. On second floor, one of two small rooms served as JS...

More Info
and City

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, and spent the evening in the Office

Term usually applies to JS’s private office, which was located at various places during JS’s lifetime, including his home and red brick store. While in JS’s red brick store, office served as church headquarters and location where JS kept his sacred writings...

More Info
with Elders [John] Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

View Full Bio
and Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
— interpreted dreams &c
The Presidents of the different Quorums met with the High Council at Brother Hyrum [Smith]

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
’s Office, to receive instructions according to the appointment of the Council on the 18th.. President Joseph Young

7 Apr. 1797–16 July 1881. Farmer, painter, glazier. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Moved to Auburn, Cayuga Co., New York, before 1830. Joined Methodist church, before Apr. 1832. Baptized into LDS...

View Full Bio
stated the reasons why the Quorum of Seventies had granted Licences, that he applied to President Joseph Smith for permission on the solicitations of the quorums; that their reasons for so doing were because Licences could not be obtained from the Church Clerk

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
, President Josiah Butterfield

13 Mar. 1795–3 Mar. 1871. Farmer, stockman. Born at Dunstable, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Abel Butterfield and Mercy Farnsworth. Married first Polly Moulton, 30 Oct. 1819. Moved to Buxton, York Co., Maine, 1820. Baptized into LDS church by John ...

View Full Bio
testified to the same, and the Council was satisfied with the Testimony. and were addressed by President Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
on the Word of Wisdom

22 January 1842 • Saturday

22 Saturday 22 I was very busy in appraising Tithing property, and in the evening revised the rules of the City Council, attended Council and spoke on their adoption, and was elected Vice Mayor pro tem of the City of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
.

23 January 1842 • Sunday

23 Sunday 23 Spent the day mostly at the office

Term usually applies to JS’s private office, which was located at various places during JS’s lifetime, including his home and red brick store. While in JS’s red brick store, office served as church headquarters and location where JS kept his sacred writings...

More Info
, and on the presentation of charges by Elder William Draper Junr.

24 Apr. 1807–28 May 1886. Farmer, shoemaker, merchant. Born at Richmond Township, Frontenac Co., Midland District (later in Greater Napanee, Lennox and Addington Co., Ontario), Upper Canada. Son of William Draper Sr. and Lydia Lathrop. Married Elizabeth Staker...

View Full Bio
, silenced Elder Daniel Wood of Pleasant Vale

Settled by 1823. Post office established, 26 Apr. 1827. Population of area later bolstered by Mormon immigration. Stake of LDS church organized in area, by Mar. 1841. Stake discontinued by letter from JS, 24 May 1841. Mormon population by Dec. 1841 about ...

More Info
for preaching that the Church ought to unsheath the sword. and Elder A. Litz for preaching that the authorities of the Church were done away &c and cited him to appear before the High Council of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
for Trial.

24 January 1842 • Monday

24 Monday 24 Reckoned with William

8 Sept. 1809–12/19 Jan. 1892. Merchant, millwright, physician. Born in Co. Tyrone, Ireland. Son of Richard Law and Ann Hunter. Immigrated to U.S. and settled in Springfield Township, Mercer Co., Pennsylvania, by 1820. Moved to Delaware Township, Mercer Co...

View Full Bio
and Wilson Law

26 Feb. 1806–15 Oct. 1876. Merchant, millwright, land speculator, farmer. Born in Ireland. Son of Richard Law and Ann Hunter. Immigrated to U.S. and settled in Springfield Township, Mercer Co., Pennsylvania, by 1820. Moved to Delaware Township, Mercer Co....

View Full Bio
in the Counting room and examined the Lots on which they are about to build a steam grain & saw Mill

25 January 1842 • Tuesday

25 Tuesday 25 Signed deeds for lots, to the Laws, transacted a variety of business in the City

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
and Office

Term usually applies to JS’s private office, which was located at various places during JS’s lifetime, including his home and red brick store. While in JS’s red brick store, office served as church headquarters and location where JS kept his sacred writings...

More Info
. in the evening debated with John C. Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

View Full Bio
and others to shew that the Indians have greater cause to complain of the treatment of the Whites, than the Negroes, or sons of Cain.

28 January 1842 • Friday

* 28th. The High Council heard and accepted the report of their Committee of the 18th. instant, as follows,
“The High Council of the Church of Jesus Christ, to the Saints of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, Greeting: Dear Brethren— As watchmen upon the Walls of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
, we feel it to be our duty to stir up your minds, by way of remembrance, of things which we conceive to be of the utmost importance to the Saints. While we rejoice at the health and prosperity of the Saints, and the good feeling which seems to prevail among us generally, and the willingness to aid in the building of the “House of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

More Info
,” we are grieved at the conduct of some, who seem to have forgotten the purpose for which they had gathered. Instead of promoting union, appeared to be engaged in sowing strifes and animosities among their brethren, spreading evil reports; brother going to law with brother, for trivial causes, which we consider a great evil, and altogether unjustifiable, except in extreme cases, and then not before the world.— We feel to advise taking the word of God for our guide, and exhort you not to forget you have come up as Saviors upon Mount Zion, consequently to seek each other’s good,— to become one: inasmuch as the Lord has said, “except ye become one, ye are none of mine.” Let us always remember the admonitions of the Apostle:—
“Dare any of you having a matter go to law before the unjust and not before the saints? Do ye not know the Saints shall judge the world? And if the world shall be judged by you, are ye unworthy to judge the smallest matter? Know ye not, that we shall judge Angels? How much more things that pertain to this life? If then, ye have judgment of things pertaining to this life, set them to judge who are least esteemed in the Church. I speak to your shame. Is it so, that there is not a wise man among you? no, not one that shall be able to judge between his brethren. But brother goeth to law with brother and that before unbelievers. Now therefore there is utterly a fault among you, because ye go to law one with another. Why do ye not rather take wrong? Why do ye [p. 1271]
<January 21> in the Store

Completed 1841. Opened for business, 5 Jan. 1842. Owned by JS, but managed mostly by others, after 1842. First floor housed JS’s general store and counting room, where tithing was received and recorded. On second floor, one of two small rooms served as JS...

More Info
and City

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, and spent the evening in the Office

Term usually applies to JS’s private office, which was located at various places during JS’s lifetime, including his home and red brick store. While in JS’s red brick store, office served as church headquarters and location where JS kept his sacred writings...

More Info
with Elders [John] Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

View Full Bio
and  [Willard] Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
— interpreted dreams &c
The Presidents of the different Quorums met with the High Council at Brother  Hyrum [Smith]

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
’s Office, to receive instructions according to the appointment of the  Council on the 18th.. President Joseph Young

7 Apr. 1797–16 July 1881. Farmer, painter, glazier. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Moved to Auburn, Cayuga Co., New York, before 1830. Joined Methodist church, before Apr. 1832. Baptized into LDS...

View Full Bio
stated the reasons why the Quorum  of Seventies had granted Licences, that he applied to President Joseph Smith for  permission on the solicitations of the quorums; that their reasons for so doing  were because Licences could not be obtained from the Church Clerk

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
, President  Josiah Butterfield

13 Mar. 1795–3 Mar. 1871. Farmer, stockman. Born at Dunstable, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Abel Butterfield and Mercy Farnsworth. Married first Polly Moulton, 30 Oct. 1819. Moved to Buxton, York Co., Maine, 1820. Baptized into LDS church by John ...

View Full Bio
testified to the same, and the Council was satisfied with the  Testimony. and were addressed by President Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
on the Word of Wisdom

22 January 1842 • Saturday

<22> Saturday 22 I was very busy in appraising Tithing property, and in  the evening revised the rules of the City Council, attended Council and spoke  on their adoption, and was elected Vice Mayor pro tem of the City of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
.

23 January 1842 • Sunday

<23> Sunday 23 Spent the day mostly at <the> office

Term usually applies to JS’s private office, which was located at various places during JS’s lifetime, including his home and red brick store. While in JS’s red brick store, office served as church headquarters and location where JS kept his sacred writings...

More Info
, and on the presentation  of charges by Elder William Draper Junr.

24 Apr. 1807–28 May 1886. Farmer, shoemaker, merchant. Born at Richmond Township, Frontenac Co., Midland District (later in Greater Napanee, Lennox and Addington Co., Ontario), Upper Canada. Son of William Draper Sr. and Lydia Lathrop. Married Elizabeth Staker...

View Full Bio
, silenced Elder Daniel Wood of  Pleasant Vale

Settled by 1823. Post office established, 26 Apr. 1827. Population of area later bolstered by Mormon immigration. Stake of LDS church organized in area, by Mar. 1841. Stake discontinued by letter from JS, 24 May 1841. Mormon population by Dec. 1841 about ...

More Info
for preaching that the Church ought to unsheath the sword.  and Elder A. Litz for preaching that the authorities of the Church were done  away &c and cited him to appear before the High Council of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
for Trial.

24 January 1842 • Monday

<24> Monday 24 Reckoned with William

8 Sept. 1809–12/19 Jan. 1892. Merchant, millwright, physician. Born in Co. Tyrone, Ireland. Son of Richard Law and Ann Hunter. Immigrated to U.S. and settled in Springfield Township, Mercer Co., Pennsylvania, by 1820. Moved to Delaware Township, Mercer Co...

View Full Bio
and Wilson Law

26 Feb. 1806–15 Oct. 1876. Merchant, millwright, land speculator, farmer. Born in Ireland. Son of Richard Law and Ann Hunter. Immigrated to U.S. and settled in Springfield Township, Mercer Co., Pennsylvania, by 1820. Moved to Delaware Township, Mercer Co....

View Full Bio
in the Counting room  and examined the Lots on which they are about to build a <steam> grain & saw Mill

25 January 1842 • Tuesday

<25> Tuesday 25 Signed deeds for lots, to the Laws, transacted a variety  of business in the City

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
and Office

Term usually applies to JS’s private office, which was located at various places during JS’s lifetime, including his home and red brick store. While in JS’s red brick store, office served as church headquarters and location where JS kept his sacred writings...

More Info
. in the evening debated with John C. Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

View Full Bio
 and others to shew that the Indians have greater cause to complain of the  treatment of the Whites, than the Negroes, or sons of Cain.

28 January 1842 • Friday

<* 28th.> The High Council heard and accepted the report of their Committee  of the 18th. instant, as follows,
“The High Council of the Church of Jesus Christ, to the Saints  of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, Greeting: Dear Brethren— As watchmen upon the Walls of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
, we feel it to be our duty to stir up your  minds, by way of remembrance, of things which we conceive to be of the utmost importance to the Saints.  While we rejoice at the health and prosperity of the Saints, and the good feeling which seems to prevail  among us generally, and the willingness to aid in the building of the “House of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

More Info
,” we are grieved at  the conduct of some, who seem to have forgotten the purpose for which they had gathered. Instead of promoting  union, appeared to be engaged in sowing strifes and animosities among their brethren, spreading  evil reports; brother going to law with brother, for trivial causes, which we consider a great evil, and altogether  unjustifiable, except in extreme cases, and then not before the world.— We feel to advise taking the word of  God for our guide, and exhort you not to forget you have come up as Saviors upon Mount Zion, consequently  to seek each other’s good,— to become one: inasmuch as the Lord has said, “except ye become one, ye are none  of mine.” Let us always remember the admonitions of the Apostle:—
“Dare any of you having a matter  go to law before the unjust and not before the saints? Do ye not know the Saints shall judge the world? And  if the world shall be judged by you, are ye unworthy to judge the smallest matter? Know ye not, that we shall  judge Angels? How much more things that pertain to this life? If then, ye have judgment of things pertaining  to this life, set them to judge who are least esteemed in the Church. I speak to your shame. Is it so, that  there is not a wise man among you? no, not one that shall be able to judge between his brethren.  But brother goeth to law with brother and that before unbelievers. Now therefore there is utterly a fault  among you, because ye go to law one with another. Why do ye not rather take wrong? Why do ye [p. 1271]
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JS, History, 1838–1856, vol. C-1, created 24 Feb. 1845–3 July 1845; handwriting of Thomas Bullock, Franklin D. Richards

2 Apr. 1821–9 Dec. 1899. Carpenter, businessman, newspaper editor. Born at Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Phinehas Richards and Wealthy Dewey. Raised Congregationalist. Baptized into LDS church by Phinehas Richards, 3 June 1838, at Richmond...

View Full Bio
, Jonathan Grimshaw, and Leo Hawkins; 512 pages, plus 24 pages of addenda; CHL. This is the third volume of a six-volume manuscript history of the church. This third volume covers the period from 2 November 1838 to 31 July 1842; the remaining five volumes, labeled A-1, B-1, D-1, E-1 and F-1, continue through 8 August 1844.

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