43990773

History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

July 4 expressed his friendly feelings towards Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, and his gratification at the good discipline of the Legion”—
Mrs. Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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and the ladies of other distinguished Officers accompanied their companions on the parade— A few Lamanites were present, and but little drinking two individuals were fined $10.—25. for offering Whiskey for sale.

5 July 1842 • Tuesday

5 Tuesday 5. Attended Court martial, and City Council, “an ordinance in relation to public Shows and Exhibitions” was passed.

6 July 1842 • Wednesday

6 Wednesday 6 Transacted business in the City

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
and rode to La Harpe

Located about twenty-five miles east of Nauvoo. Settled 1830. Originally called Franklin. Developed, platted, and renamed La Harpe, by 1836. Immigration and missionary work led to creation of branch of LDS church in area, 17 Apr. 1841. Mormon population by...

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with Emma

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
. Two keel boats sloop rigged, and laden with provisions and apparatus necessary for the occasion, and manned with fifty of the brethren started this morning on an expedition to the Upper Mississippi

Principal U.S. river running southward from Itasca Lake, Minnesota, to Gulf of Mexico. Covered 3,160-mile course, 1839 (now about 2,350 miles). Drains about 1,100,000 square miles. Steamboat travel on Mississippi very important in 1830s and 1840s for shipping...

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, among the Pineries

Also known as pinery. Area near Black River where lumbering operation was established to provide timber for construction of Nauvoo temple, Nauvoo House, and other public buildings. Four mills established on Black River, ca. Sept. 1841: three near Black River...

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, where they can join those already there, and erect Mills, saw boards and plank, make shingles, hew timber, and return next spring with rafts for the Temple

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

More Info
of God, Nauvoo House

JS revelation, dated 19 Jan. 1841, instructed Saints to build boarding house for travelers and immigrants. Construction of planned three-story building to be funded by fifty-dollar shares. Cornerstone laid, 2 Oct. 1841, but building never completed beyond...

More Info
&c, to beautify the City of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
according to the Prophets.

7 July 1842 • Thursday

7. Thursday 7. Weather very cool at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, Thermometer at 60 degrees.

9 July 1842 • Saturday

9 Saturday 9. I rode on the prairie with Brothers [William] Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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and [William] Gheen to look at some land. Dined on my farm

JS purchased one hundred fifty-three acres for farm, 16 Sept. 1841, to be paid off over time. Located about three miles east of Nauvoo on south side of Old Road to Carthage. Farm managed by Cornelius P. Lott and wife, Permelia. JS frequently labored on farm...

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, hoed potatoes &c and in the afternoon returned to the City

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
and transacted a variety of business. I find the following “Phrenological Chart” of my Clerk Elder Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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of the Quorum of the Twelve by “A. Crane M.D.” Propensities
Amativeness— 8, F, very partial to the opposite sex; generally reciprocated by them.
Philoprogenitiveness— 7, F, interested in the happiness of children; fond of their company.
Inhabitiveness— 6, F. attached to place of long residence; no desire to change residence.
Adhesiveness— 11, V L, passionately and devotedly attached to lovers and friends.
Combativeness— 7. F. great powers of exertion and sustaining, under opposition and difficulties.
Destructiveness— 6 M, ability to control the passions; and is not disposed to extreme measures.
Secretiveness— 10. L. great propensity and ability to conceal feelings, plans, &c
Acquisitiveness— 8, F, frugality and industry, without much of the miserly penurious or stingy feeling.
Alimentiveness— 8, F, a good appetite, but not excessive; partiality for a variety of rich hearty dishes.
Vivativeness— 7, L, strong desire to exist; contemplates death as the greatest misfortune.
Feelings— Cautiousness. 8, L. discretion, carefulness, anxiety, apprehension &c.
Approbativeness— 10 L, ambition for distinction, sense of character; sensibility to reproach, fear of scandal.
Self-esteem— 10, L, high mindedness, independence, self confidence, dignity; aspiration for greatness
Concentrativeness— 7, F, can dwell on a subject without fatigue, and controll the imagination.
Sentiment, Benevolence— 9, L, kindness, goodness, tenderness, sympathy.
Veneration— 7, F religion without great awe or enthusiasm; reasonable deference to superiority,
Firmness— 9, L, stability and decision of character and purpose.
Conscientiousness— 8, L, high regard for duty, integrity, moral principle, justice obligation, truth, &c.
Hope— 7, F, reasonable hopes, a fine flow of spirits; anticipation of what is to be realized.
Marvellousness— 6 F, openness to conviction without blind credulity; tolerably good degree of faith.
Imitation— 10, F, a disposition and respectable ability to imitate, but not to mimic, or to act out.
Prepossession 8, L, or F, attached to certain notions; not disposed to change them &c.
Ideality— 10, L lively imagination; fancy taste, love of poetry, elegance, eloquence, excellence &c.
Perceptives. Admonition— 9 F or M desirous to know what others are doing: ready to [p. 1355]
<July 4> expressed his friendly feelings towards Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, and his gratification at the good  discipline of the Legion”—
Mrs. Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
and the ladies of other distinguished  Officers accompanied their companions on the parade— A few Lamanites were  present, and but little drinking two individuals were fined $10.—25. for offering  Whiskey for sale.

5 July 1842 • Tuesday

<5> Tuesday 5. Attended Court martial, and City Council, <“an ordinance in> relation to public  Shows and Exhibitions” was passed.

6 July 1842 • Wednesday

<6> Wednesday 6 Transacted business in the City

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
and rode to La Harp[e]

Located about twenty-five miles east of Nauvoo. Settled 1830. Originally called Franklin. Developed, platted, and renamed La Harpe, by 1836. Immigration and missionary work led to creation of branch of LDS church in area, 17 Apr. 1841. Mormon population by...

More Info
with Emma

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
.  Two keel boats sloop rigged, and laden with provisions and apparatus necessary  for the occasion, and manned with fifty of the brethren started this morning  on an expedition to the Upper Mississippi

Principal U.S. river running southward from Itasca Lake, Minnesota, to Gulf of Mexico. Covered 3,160-mile course, 1839 (now about 2,350 miles). Drains about 1,100,000 square miles. Steamboat travel on Mississippi very important in 1830s and 1840s for shipping...

More Info
, among the Pineries

Also known as pinery. Area near Black River where lumbering operation was established to provide timber for construction of Nauvoo temple, Nauvoo House, and other public buildings. Four mills established on Black River, ca. Sept. 1841: three near Black River...

More Info
, where they can  join those already there, and erect Mills, saw boards and plank, make shingles,  hew timber, and return next spring with rafts for the Temple

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

More Info
of God, Nauvoo  House

JS revelation, dated 19 Jan. 1841, instructed Saints to build boarding house for travelers and immigrants. Construction of planned three-story building to be funded by fifty-dollar shares. Cornerstone laid, 2 Oct. 1841, but building never completed beyond...

More Info
&c, to beautify the City of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
according to the Prophets.

7 July 1842 • Thursday

<7.> Thursday 7. Weather very cool at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, Thermometer at 60 degrees.

9 July 1842 • Saturday

<9> Saturday 9. I rode on the prairie with Brothers [William] Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

View Full Bio
and [William] Gheen to  look at some land. Dined on my farm

JS purchased one hundred fifty-three acres for farm, 16 Sept. 1841, to be paid off over time. Located about three miles east of Nauvoo on south side of Old Road to Carthage. Farm managed by Cornelius P. Lott and wife, Permelia. JS frequently labored on farm...

More Info
, hoed potatoes &c and in the <afternoon><afternoon> returned  to the City

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
and transacted a variety of business. I find the following “Phrenological  Chart” of my Clerk Elder Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
of the Quorum of the Twelve by “A. Crane  M.D.” Propensities
Amativeness— 8, F, very partial to the opposite sex; generally reciprocated by them.
Philoprogenitiveness— 7, F, interested in the happiness of children; fond of their company.
Inhabitiveness— 6, F. attached to place of long residence; no desire to change residence.
Adhesiveness— 11, V L, passionately and devotedly attached to lovers and friends.
Combativeness— 7. F. great powers of exertion and sustaining, under opposition and difficulties.
Destructiveness— 6 M, ability to control the passions; and is not disposed to extreme measures.
Secretiveness— 10. L. great propensity and ability to conceal feelings, plans, &c
Acquisitiveness— 8, F, frugality and industry, without much of the miserly penurious or stingy feeling.
Alimentiveness— 8, F, a good appetite, but not excessive; partiality for a variety of rich hearty dishes.
Vivativeness— 7, L, strong desire to exist; contemplates death as the greatest misfortune.
Feelings— Cautiousness. 8, L. discretion, carefulness, anxiety, apprehension &c.
Approbativeness— 10 L, ambition for distinction, sense of character; sensibility to reproach, fear of scandal.
Self-esteem— 10, L, high mindedness, independence, self confidence, dignity; aspiration for greatness
Concentrativeness— 7, F, can dwell on a subject without fatigue, and controll the imagination.
Sentiment, Benevolence— 9, L, kindness, goodness, tenderness, sympathy.
Veneration— 7, F religion without great awe or enthusiasm; reasonable deference to superiority,
Firmness— 9, L, stability and decision of character and purpose.
Conscientiousness— 8, L, high regard for duty, integrity, moral principle, justice obligation, truth, &c.
Hope— 7, F, reasonable hopes, a fine flow of spirits; anticipation of what is to be realized.
Marvellousness— 6 F, openness to conviction without blind credulity; tolerably good degree of faith.
Imitation— 10, F, a disposition and respectable ability to imitate, but not to mimic, or to act out.
Prepossession 8, L, or F, attached to certain notions; not disposed to change them &c.
Ideality— 10, L lively imagination; fancy taste, love of poetry, elegance, eloquence, excellence &c.
Perceptives. Admonition— 9 F or M desirous to know what others are doing: ready to [p. 1355]
PreviousNext
This document, volume C-1, is the third of six volumes of the “Manuscript History of the Church.” The collection was compiled over an eighteen-year span from 1838 to 1856 and covers the period from 23 December 1805 to 8 August 1844. The narrative in this volume commences on 2 November 1838 with JS and other church leaders being held prisoner by the “Governor

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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’s forces” at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri, and concludes with the death of Bishop Vinson Knight

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

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at Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, on 31 July 1842. For a more complete discussion of the entire six-volume work, see the general introduction to this history.
Volume C-1 was created beginning on or just after 24 February 1845 and its narrative completed on 3 May although work continued on the volume through 3 July of that year (Richards, Journal, 24 and 28 Feb. 1845; Historian’s Office, Journal, 3 May 1845; 3 and 4 July 1845). It is in the handwriting of Thomas Bullock and contains 512 pages of primary text, plus 24 pages of addenda. Additional addenda for this volume were created at a later date in a separate volume, and will appear in this collection as a separate document. Compilers Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Thomas Bullock drew heavily from JS’s letters, discourses, and diary entries; meeting minutes; church and other periodicals and journals; and reminiscences, recollections, and letters of church members and other contacts. At JS’s behest, they had maintained the first-person, chronological-narrative format established in previous volumes, as if JS were the author. Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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, George A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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, and others reviewed and modified the manuscript prior to its eventual publication in the Salt Lake City newspaper Deseret News.
The historical narrative recorded in volume C-1 continued the account of JS’s life as prophet and president of the church. Critical events occurring within the forty-five-month period of this volume include the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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Mormon War; subsequent legal trials of church leaders; expulsion of the Saints from Missouri; missionary efforts in England by the Twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

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and others; attempts by JS to obtain federal redress for the Missouri depredations; publication of the LDS Millennial Star in England; the migration of English converts to America; missionary efforts in other nations; the death of church patriarch Joseph Smith Sr.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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; the establishment of the Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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city charter; the commencement of construction of the Nauvoo temple

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

More Info
; the Wisconsin “pinery”

Also known as pinery. Area near Black River where lumbering operation was established to provide timber for construction of Nauvoo temple, Nauvoo House, and other public buildings. Four mills established on Black River, ca. Sept. 1841: three near Black River...

More Info
expedition that facilitated temple construction; the introduction of the doctrine of proxy baptism for deceased persons; the dedicatory prayer by Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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on the Mount of Olives in Palestine; publication of the “Book of Abraham” in the Nauvoo Times and Seasons; publication of the JS history often referred to as the “Wentworth letter;” the organization of the Female Relief Society of Nauvoo; and the inception of Nauvoo-era temple endowment ceremonies.

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