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History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

1841 Augt. 7 over, and set us across the river, where we warmed ourselves a little, and pursued our journey until about breakfast time, when we stopped at the house of a man, who, we afterwards learned, was a leader of the mob at Haun’s [Hawn’s] Mill massacre; and started the next morning without breakfast. Our route lay through a wild prairie, where there was but very little track, and only one house in forty miles. The north-west wind blew fiercely in our faces, and the ground was so slippery that we could scarcely keep our feet, and when the night came on, to add to our perplexity, we lost our way; soon after which, I become so cold that it was with great difficulty I could keep from freezing. We also became extremely thirsty; however, we found a remedy for this by cutting through ice three inches thick with a penknife. While we were drinking, we heard a cow bell; this caused our hearts to leap for joy, and we arose and steered our course towards the sound. We soon entered Tenneys grove, which sheltered us from the wind, and we felt more comfortable. In a short time we came to the house, of Whitford G. Wilson, where—— we were made welcome and kindly entertained. We laid down to rest about two o’clock in the morning, after having travelled one hundred and ten miles in two days and two nights. After breakfast I set out for Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, leaving George A.

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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sick with our hospitable friend. When I arrived on the evening of Dec 25 I was fortunate enough to find my family alive, and in tolerable health; which was more than I could have expected, considering the scenes of persecution through which they had passed.”
Don Carlos

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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visited us several times while we were in Liberty Jail, and brought our wives to see us, and some money and—— articles to relieve our necessities. He took charge of father

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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’s family in his flight from Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, and saw them removed to Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

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, Illinois for safety.
In June 1839 he commenced making preparations for printing the Times and Seasons. The press and type had been resurrected by Elias Smith, Hyrum [Hiram] Clark and others, from its grave in Dawson’s yard, Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, where it was buried for safety the night that General Lucas

19 July 1799–23 Feb. 1868. Store owner, recorder of deeds. Born at Washington Co., Kentucky. Son of Samuel Lucas Sr. Married Theresa Bartlett Allen, ca. Nov. 1823, in Harrison Co., Kentucky. Member of Presbyterian church. Lived at Independence, Jackson Co...

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surrounded the City

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
with the mob militia. The form for a No. of the Elder’s Journal was buried with the ink on it. They were considerably injured by the damp; it was [p. 17]
<1841  Augt. 7 > over, and set us across the river, where we warmed ourselves a little,  and pursued our journey until about breakfast time, when we  stopped at the house of a man, who, we afterwards learned, was  a leader of the mob at Haun’s [Hawn’s] Mill massacre; and started the  next morning without breakfast. Our route lay through a wild  prairie, where there was but very little track, and only one house  in forty miles. The north-west wind blew fiercely in our faces,  and the ground was so slippery that we could scarcely keep  our feet, and when the night came on, to add to our perplexity,  we lost our way; soon after which, I become so cold that  it was with great difficulty I could keep from freezing. We  also became extremely thirsty; however, we found a remedy  for this by cutting through ice three inches thick with a penknife.  While we were drinking, we heard a cow bell; this caused  our hearts to leap for joy, and we arose and steered our  course towards the sound. We soon entered Tenneys grove,  which sheltered us from the wind, and we felt more comfortable.  In a short time we came to the house, of Whitford G.  Wilson, where—— we were made welcome and  kindly entertained. We laid down to rest about two o’clock  in the morning, after having travelled one hundred and ten  miles in two days and two nights. After breakfast I set  out for Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, leaving George A.

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

View Full Bio
sick with our hospitable  friend. When I arrived <on the evening of Dec 25> I was fortunate enough to find  my family alive, and in tolerable health; which was more  than I could have expected, considering the scenes of persecution  through which they had passed.”
Don Carlos

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

View Full Bio
visited us several times while we were in  Liberty Jail, and brought our wives to see us, and some  money and—— articles to relieve our necessities. He took  charge of father

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

View Full Bio
’s family in his flight from Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, and  saw them removed to Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

More Info
, Illinois for safety.
In June 1839 he commenced making preparations for printing  the Times and Seasons. The press and type had been resurrected by  Elias Smith, Hyrum [Hiram] Clark and others, from its grave in Dawson’s  yard, Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, where it was buried for safety the night that  General Lucas

19 July 1799–23 Feb. 1868. Store owner, recorder of deeds. Born at Washington Co., Kentucky. Son of Samuel Lucas Sr. Married Theresa Bartlett Allen, ca. Nov. 1823, in Harrison Co., Kentucky. Member of Presbyterian church. Lived at Independence, Jackson Co...

View Full Bio
surrounded the City

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
with the mob militia. The  form for a No. of the Elder’s Journal was buried with the ink on  it. They were considerably injured by the damp; it was [p. 17]
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JS, History, 1838–1856, vol. C-1, addenda, created 18 Oct.–ca. 20 Nov. 1854; 75 pages in volume bearing three labels reading “Historical Notation,” “From 1841 to 1851,” and “Addenda to C1;” handwriting of Leo Hawkins, Jonathan Grimshaw, Robert Campbell, and John L. Smith; CHL.

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