27470

Journal, 1839

evening the neighbors came in, and I gave them a short discourse,

20 June 1839 • Thursday

Thursday following went to Elder Zebedee Coulters Coltrin’s

7 Sept. 1804–21 July 1887. Born at Ovid, Seneca Co., New York. Son of John Coltrin and Sarah Graham. Member of Methodist church. Married first Julia Ann Jennings, Oct. 1828. Baptized into LDS church by Solomon Hancock, 9 Jan. 1831, at Strongsville, Cuyahoga...

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,23

Coltrin, president of the local congregation, apparently lived in or near Macomb, McDonough County, Illinois. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31.)  


from there were invited to visit a brother br Vance’s24

Probably John Vance, who lived in or near Macomb, McDonough County, Illinois. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31; Woodruff, Journal, 11–12 Aug. 1839; “Agents for the Times and Seasons,” Times and Seasons, Feb. 1840, 1:64.)  


which wee did and there gave to the brethren and friends of the Neigborhood,25

The local Latter-day Saint congregation consisted of about seventy members. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31.)  


a brief history or account of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon,

22–23 June 1839 • Saturday–Sunday

Saturday 22nd we returned to Don C’s Don Carlos Smith’s

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

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place, And on Sunday went to Br Wilcox’s26

Probably Benjamin Wilcox, who lived in or near Macomb, McDonough County, Illinois. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31.)  


and there preached to a very crowded congregation and so eager were they to hear that a part of them stood out in the rain during the sermon, & in general they all expressed good satisfaction as to what they had heard.

24–25 June 1839 • Monday–Tuesday

Monday 24th started for home and got as far as Br Parkins Ute Perkins Sr.

15 July 1761–11 Mar. 1844. Born at Anson Co. (later Lincoln Co.), North Carolina. Son of Robert Biggan Perkins and Elizabeth Lollar. Served in American Revolution, 1778–1779. Moved to what became Abbeville Co., South Carolina, 1779. Married Sarah (Sally) ...

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, near Fountain green

Unincorporated village (originally named Lick Grove, then Horse Lick Grove). Located about twenty miles east of Nauvoo, Illinois, and ten miles northeast of Carthage, Illinois. Area settled by Ute Perkins, 1826. Post office established, 1833. Named changed...

More Info
, Hancock Co— when they insisted that we should tarry, and on Tuesday we held meeting, and spoke with considerable liberty to a large congregation,

26 June 1839 • Wednesday

Wednesday 26th arrived all safe & sound, at home,— Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

More Info
Ill.,

Editorial Note
Contemporaneous journal keeping resumed at about this point in the journal.

27 June 1839 • Thursday

Thursday, attended a conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

View Glossary
[p. 4]
evening the neighbors came in, and  I gave them a short discourse,

20 June 1839 • Thursday

Thursday following went to Elder Zebedee  Coulters [Coltrin’s]

7 Sept. 1804–21 July 1887. Born at Ovid, Seneca Co., New York. Son of John Coltrin and Sarah Graham. Member of Methodist church. Married first Julia Ann Jennings, Oct. 1828. Baptized into LDS church by Solomon Hancock, 9 Jan. 1831, at Strongsville, Cuyahoga...

View Full Bio
,23

Coltrin, president of the local congregation, apparently lived in or near Macomb, McDonough County, Illinois. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31.)  


from there were invited to visit  a brother br Vance’s24

Probably John Vance, who lived in or near Macomb, McDonough County, Illinois. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31; Woodruff, Journal, 11–12 Aug. 1839; “Agents for the Times and Seasons,” Times and Seasons, Feb. 1840, 1:64.)  


which wee did  and there gave to the brethren and  friends of the Neigborhood,25

The local Latter-day Saint congregation consisted of about seventy members. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31.)  


a brief  history or account of the coming forth  of the Book of Mormon,

22–23 June 1839 • Saturday–Sunday

Saturday 22nd we returned to Don  C’s [Don Carlos Smith’s]

25 Mar. 1816–7 Aug. 1841. Farmer, printer, editor. Born at Norwich, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816–Jan. 1817. Moved to Manchester, Ontario Co., 1825. Baptized into LDS church by David...

View Full Bio
place, And on Sunday went  to Br Wilcox’s26

Probably Benjamin Wilcox, who lived in or near Macomb, McDonough County, Illinois. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31.)  


and there preached  to a very crowded congregation  and so eager were they to hear that a  part of them stood out in the rain  during the sermon, & <in> general they  all expressed good satisfaction as to  what they had heard.

24–25 June 1839 • Monday–Tuesday

Monday 24th started for home and got  as far as Br Parkins [Ute Perkins Sr.]

15 July 1761–11 Mar. 1844. Born at Anson Co. (later Lincoln Co.), North Carolina. Son of Robert Biggan Perkins and Elizabeth Lollar. Served in American Revolution, 1778–1779. Moved to what became Abbeville Co., South Carolina, 1779. Married Sarah (Sally) ...

View Full Bio
, near Fountain  green

Unincorporated village (originally named Lick Grove, then Horse Lick Grove). Located about twenty miles east of Nauvoo, Illinois, and ten miles northeast of Carthage, Illinois. Area settled by Ute Perkins, 1826. Post office established, 1833. Named changed...

More Info
, Hancock Co— when they  insisted that we should tarry, and  on Tuesday we held meeting, and  spoke with considerable liberty  to a large congregation,

26 June 1839 • Wednesday

Wednesday 26th arrived all safe &  sound, at home,— Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

More Info
Ill.,

Editorial Note
Contemporaneous journal keeping resumed at about this point in the journal.

27 June 1839 • Thursday

Thursday, attended a conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

View Glossary
[p. 4]
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JS, “Minute Book. 1839 J. Smiths Journal Escape from Prison,” Journal, Apr.–Oct. 1839; handwriting of James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; fifteen pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
Makeshift notebook, 10 x 4 inches (25 x 10 cm). The journal was fashioned by folding eight 10 x 8 inch (25 x 20 cm) sheets of paper in half lengthwise to form the notebook of sixteen leaves (thirty-two pages). Inscriptions that reach the end of a line and cross the gutter onto another leaf indicate that the folded pages were not sewn during their original use. Wear on the first and last pages indicates that the pages were not bound for some time. The text of the journal is inscribed on the first fifteen pages in black ink that later turned brown. The remaining seventeen pages are blank. At some point a cover for the notebook was made with a 10 x 16 inch (25 x 41 cm) sheet of blue-colored cover stock folded in half twice to create a 10 x 4 inch cover, which was then pamphlet bound with hand stitching. On the front cover, James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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wrote “Minute Book. | 1839 | J. Smiths Journal | Escape from Prison” with seven decorative underlines in black ink. On the back cover, the lines “Joseph Smith’s Journal | Escape from Prison 1839” are written sideways near the top in black ink. This notation, in unidentified handwriting, appears to be early archival marking. Textual redactions and use marks made in graphite pencil were added by later scribes who used the journal to produce the multivolume manuscript history of the church.
This thin journal was probably among the miscellaneous documents collectively listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Inventory,” [2]; “Historian’s Office Inventory,” [3], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


The use of the journal in connection with the manuscript history, early inventories, and recent archival records indicate that this journal—like the other JS journals—has remained in continuous church custody.2

See Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


Facts