53992206

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 1, 21 December 1842–10 March 1843

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 1, 21 December 1842–10 March 1843

Lyman

30 Mar. 1813–4 Feb. 1877. Boatman, gunsmith, farmer. Born at Lyman, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of Boswell Lyman and Martha Mason. Baptized into LDS church by Lyman E. Johnson, 27 Apr. 1832. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, May–June 1832. Ordained an...

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464

Power of attorney, JS to Amasa Lyman, Nauvoo, IL, 28 Feb. 1843, JS Collection, CHL.  


to seell sell all the Lands in Henderson County deeded to me by Mr Mc. Quinn Robert McQueen

8 Aug. 1808–13 Dec. 1886. Miller, miner, farmer. Born in New York City. Moved to Warren Co. (later Henderson Co.), Illinois, by 1836. Cofounded Shokokon, Warren Co., with Charles A. Smith. Elected justice of the peace in Warren Co., 1838. Married Mary P. ...

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.—465

John Cowan offered land in Shokokon, Henderson County, to JS on 17 February 1843. On 20 February, McQueen deeded to JS over thirty lots in Shokokon for $1,230. (JS, Journal, 17 Feb. 1843; Henderson Co., IL, Deed Records, vol. 1, pp. 312–313, microfilm 1,392,775, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  


walked out

Editorial Note
The following two journal entries—for 2 and 3 March 1843—deal almost exclusively with a medical malpractice suit that was tried in the Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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mayor’s court, over which JS presided. The case grew out of events that occurred on 22–24 October 1842 involving the plaintiff’s pregnant wife, Margaret Kennedy Dana

1 Apr. 1807–15 June 1850. Born at Argyle, Washington Co., New York. Daughter of Alexander Kennedy and Sybil Cannon. Married first Mr. Lusk, ca. 1825. Married second Charles Root Dana, ca. 1827, in Lowville, Lewis Co., New York. Moved to Hammond, St. Lawrence...

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, and the defendant, Dr. William Brink

1810–4 Feb. 1884. Physician, cooper. Born in Pennsylvania. Married first Amelia. Practiced Thomsonian medicine. Defendant in malpractice lawsuit, 1843, at Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois. Baptized into LDS church, by Apr. 1843. Ordained an elder, 10 Apr. 1843...

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, a Thomsonian physician. The plaintiff, Charles Dana

8 Nov. 1802–7 Aug. 1868. Mason, Farmer. Born in Schenectady, Albany Co., New York. Son of Francis Dana and Huldah Root. Married Margaret Kennedy Lusk, ca. 1827, in Lowville, Lewis Co., New York. Moved to Hammond, St. Lawrence Co., New York, ca. 1829. Baptized...

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, charged Dr. Brink, who had been called to treat a fever in Margaret Dana, with causing premature childbirth by misdiagnosis and unjustifiable practices that left Margaret’s health impaired.466

See “Decision,” The Wasp, 22 Mar. 1843, [2]–[3].  


Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, a Thomsonian doctor himself,467

“History of Willard Richards,” Deseret News, 23 June 1858, 73.  


devoted over forty pages of the journal to recording the arguments and testimony presented in the case—probably because of his professional interest in the medical details. Richards’s notes of the trial, although disjointed at times, also illustrate how JS and his associates understood and applied the law.

2 March 1843 • Thursday

Thursday march 2d 1843 adjourned case of Charles Dana

8 Nov. 1802–7 Aug. 1868. Mason, Farmer. Born in Schenectady, Albany Co., New York. Son of Francis Dana and Huldah Root. Married Margaret Kennedy Lusk, ca. 1827, in Lowville, Lewis Co., New York. Moved to Hammond, St. Lawrence Co., New York, ca. 1829. Baptized...

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vs Dr William Brink

1810–4 Feb. 1884. Physician, cooper. Born in Pennsylvania. Married first Amelia. Practiced Thomsonian medicine. Defendant in malpractice lawsuit, 1843, at Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois. Baptized into LDS church, by Apr. 1843. Ordained an elder, 10 Apr. 1843...

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in assumpsit came up at 10 A.M. Before the Mayor at Masons. Hall.—469

The upper room of JS’s store. The case was called up ten days earlier but postponed until this date. (JS, Journal, 20 Feb. 1843.)  


Orson Spencer

13 May 1802–15 Oct. 1855. Teacher, minister, university professor and chancellor. Born in West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Daniel Spencer and Chloe Wilson. Moved to Lenox, Berkshire Co., 1817; to Schenectady, Schenectady Co., New York...

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side justice, Onias Skinner

21 July 1817–4 Feb. 1877. Sailor, teacher, preacher, farmer, lawyer, railroad president. Born in Floyd, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Onias Skinner and Tirza. Moved to Whitestown, Oneida Co., by 1830; to Peoria Co., Illinois, 1836; and to Greenville, Darke...

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Esqr for Plaintive. claimed $99470

Illinois law limited the jurisdiction of justices of the peace in contract or “assumpsit” cases like this one to those where the debt or demand did not exceed one hundred dollars. (An Act concerning Justices of the Peace and Constables [3 Feb. 1827], Revised Code of Laws, of Illinois [1826–1827], pp. 259– 260, sec. 1.)  


failing to perform correctly as physician in treatment of Dana

8 Nov. 1802–7 Aug. 1868. Mason, Farmer. Born in Schenectady, Albany Co., New York. Son of Francis Dana and Huldah Root. Married Margaret Kennedy Lusk, ca. 1827, in Lowville, Lewis Co., New York. Moved to Hammond, St. Lawrence Co., New York, ca. 1829. Baptized...

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’s wife

1 Apr. 1807–15 June 1850. Born at Argyle, Washington Co., New York. Daughter of Alexander Kennedy and Sybil Cannon. Married first Mr. Lusk, ca. 1825. Married second Charles Root Dana, ca. 1827, in Lowville, Lewis Co., New York. Moved to Hammond, St. Lawrence...

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,471 complaint read. Witnesses Dr Robert D. Foster

14 Mar. 1811–1 Feb. 1878. Physician, land speculator. Born in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England. Son of John Foster and Jane Knibb. Married Sarah Phinney, 18 July 1837, at Medina Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church, before Oct. 1839. Ordained an elder,...

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, Dr John F. Weld

11 Dec. 1809–28 July 1892. Physician, surgeon. Born in Berkshire, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Daniel Weld and Lydia Fuller. Moved to Cornish, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire, by 1810. Moved to Sonora Township, Hancock Co., Illinois, 1827. Attended Dartmouth...

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, Dr Bennet Samuel Bennett

Ca. 1810–May 1893. Market inspector, barometer manufacturer, physician. Born in England. Married Selina Campion. Baptized into LDS church, by 1839, in U.S. Ordained an elder, 23 Dec. 1839, in Philadelphia. Served as presiding elder, 1840, in Philadelphia....

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Mrs Patty Bartlett Sessions

4 Feb. 1795–14 Dec. 1892. Midwife. Born in Newry, York Co., Maine. Daughter of Enoch Bartlett and Anna Hall. Married David Sessions, 29 June 1812, in Bethel, Oxford Co., Maine. Lived in Newry. Baptized into Methodist church, 1816. Moved to Andover, Oxford...

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472

In addition to Drs. Foster, Weld, and Bennett, and midwife Sessions, other witnesses at the trial included Dr. George R. Bostwick, Mary Deuel, Prudence Marks Miles, Jacob Shoemaker, Charles Higbee, and Margaret Kennedy Dana.  


[p. [225]]
Lyman

30 Mar. 1813–4 Feb. 1877. Boatman, gunsmith, farmer. Born at Lyman, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of Boswell Lyman and Martha Mason. Baptized into LDS church by Lyman E. Johnson, 27 Apr. 1832. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, May–June 1832. Ordained an...

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464

Power of attorney, JS to Amasa Lyman, Nauvoo, IL, 28 Feb. 1843, JS Collection, CHL.  


to seell [sell] all the Lands  in Henderson County deeded  to me by Mr Mc. Quinn [Robert McQueen]

8 Aug. 1808–13 Dec. 1886. Miller, miner, farmer. Born in New York City. Moved to Warren Co. (later Henderson Co.), Illinois, by 1836. Cofounded Shokokon, Warren Co., with Charles A. Smith. Elected justice of the peace in Warren Co., 1838. Married Mary P. ...

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.—465

John Cowan offered land in Shokokon, Henderson County, to JS on 17 February 1843. On 20 February, McQueen deeded to JS over thirty lots in Shokokon for $1,230. (JS, Journal, 17 Feb. 1843; Henderson Co., IL, Deed Records, vol. 1, pp. 312–313, microfilm 1,392,775, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  


walked out

Editorial Note
The following two journal entries—for 2 and 3 March 1843—deal almost exclusively with a medical malpractice suit that was tried in the Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
mayor’s court, over which JS presided. The case grew out of events that occurred on 22–24 October 1842 involving the plaintiff’s pregnant wife, Margaret Kennedy Dana

1 Apr. 1807–15 June 1850. Born at Argyle, Washington Co., New York. Daughter of Alexander Kennedy and Sybil Cannon. Married first Mr. Lusk, ca. 1825. Married second Charles Root Dana, ca. 1827, in Lowville, Lewis Co., New York. Moved to Hammond, St. Lawrence...

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, and the defendant, Dr. William Brink

1810–4 Feb. 1884. Physician, cooper. Born in Pennsylvania. Married first Amelia. Practiced Thomsonian medicine. Defendant in malpractice lawsuit, 1843, at Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois. Baptized into LDS church, by Apr. 1843. Ordained an elder, 10 Apr. 1843...

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, a Thomsonian physician. The plaintiff, Charles Dana

8 Nov. 1802–7 Aug. 1868. Mason, Farmer. Born in Schenectady, Albany Co., New York. Son of Francis Dana and Huldah Root. Married Margaret Kennedy Lusk, ca. 1827, in Lowville, Lewis Co., New York. Moved to Hammond, St. Lawrence Co., New York, ca. 1829. Baptized...

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, charged Dr. Brink, who had been called to treat a fever in Margaret Dana, with causing premature childbirth by misdiagnosis and unjustifiable practices that left Margaret’s health impaired.466

See “Decision,” The Wasp, 22 Mar. 1843, [2]–[3].  


Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, a Thomsonian doctor himself,467

“History of Willard Richards,” Deseret News, 23 June 1858, 73.  


devoted over forty pages of the journal to recording the arguments and testimony presented in the case—probably because of his professional interest in the medical details. Richards’s notes of the trial, although disjointed at times, also illustrate how JS and his associates understood and applied the law.

2 March 1843 • Thursday

Thursday march 2d 1843  adjourned case of Charles Dana

8 Nov. 1802–7 Aug. 1868. Mason, Farmer. Born in Schenectady, Albany Co., New York. Son of Francis Dana and Huldah Root. Married Margaret Kennedy Lusk, ca. 1827, in Lowville, Lewis Co., New York. Moved to Hammond, St. Lawrence Co., New York, ca. 1829. Baptized...

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 vs Dr468

TEXT: The “r” in “Dr” is double underlined.  


[William] Brink

1810–4 Feb. 1884. Physician, cooper. Born in Pennsylvania. Married first Amelia. Practiced Thomsonian medicine. Defendant in malpractice lawsuit, 1843, at Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois. Baptized into LDS church, by Apr. 1843. Ordained an elder, 10 Apr. 1843...

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in assumpsit came up  at 10 A.M. Before the Mayor at Masons.  Hall.—469

The upper room of JS’s store. The case was called up ten days earlier but postponed until this date. (JS, Journal, 20 Feb. 1843.)  


Orson Spencer

13 May 1802–15 Oct. 1855. Teacher, minister, university professor and chancellor. Born in West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Daniel Spencer and Chloe Wilson. Moved to Lenox, Berkshire Co., 1817; to Schenectady, Schenectady Co., New York...

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side justice,  [Onias] Skinner

21 July 1817–4 Feb. 1877. Sailor, teacher, preacher, farmer, lawyer, railroad president. Born in Floyd, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Onias Skinner and Tirza. Moved to Whitestown, Oneida Co., by 1830; to Peoria Co., Illinois, 1836; and to Greenville, Darke...

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Esqr for Plaintive. claimed $99470

Illinois law limited the jurisdiction of justices of the peace in contract or “assumpsit” cases like this one to those where the debt or demand did not exceed one hundred dollars. (An Act concerning Justices of the Peace and Constables [3 Feb. 1827], Revised Code of Laws, of Illinois [1826–1827], pp. 259– 260, sec. 1.)  


 failing to perform correctly as physic[i]an  in treatment of Dana

8 Nov. 1802–7 Aug. 1868. Mason, Farmer. Born in Schenectady, Albany Co., New York. Son of Francis Dana and Huldah Root. Married Margaret Kennedy Lusk, ca. 1827, in Lowville, Lewis Co., New York. Moved to Hammond, St. Lawrence Co., New York, ca. 1829. Baptized...

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’s wife

1 Apr. 1807–15 June 1850. Born at Argyle, Washington Co., New York. Daughter of Alexander Kennedy and Sybil Cannon. Married first Mr. Lusk, ca. 1825. Married second Charles Root Dana, ca. 1827, in Lowville, Lewis Co., New York. Moved to Hammond, St. Lawrence...

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,471 complaint  read. Witnesses Dr [Robert D.] Foster

14 Mar. 1811–1 Feb. 1878. Physician, land speculator. Born in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England. Son of John Foster and Jane Knibb. Married Sarah Phinney, 18 July 1837, at Medina Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church, before Oct. 1839. Ordained an elder,...

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, Dr [John F.] Weld

11 Dec. 1809–28 July 1892. Physician, surgeon. Born in Berkshire, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Daniel Weld and Lydia Fuller. Moved to Cornish, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire, by 1810. Moved to Sonora Township, Hancock Co., Illinois, 1827. Attended Dartmouth...

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, Dr Bennet [Samuel Bennett]

Ca. 1810–May 1893. Market inspector, barometer manufacturer, physician. Born in England. Married Selina Campion. Baptized into LDS church, by 1839, in U.S. Ordained an elder, 23 Dec. 1839, in Philadelphia. Served as presiding elder, 1840, in Philadelphia....

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Mrs [Patty Bartlett] Sessions

4 Feb. 1795–14 Dec. 1892. Midwife. Born in Newry, York Co., Maine. Daughter of Enoch Bartlett and Anna Hall. Married David Sessions, 29 June 1812, in Bethel, Oxford Co., Maine. Lived in Newry. Baptized into Methodist church, 1816. Moved to Andover, Oxford...

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472

In addition to Drs. Foster, Weld, and Bennett, and midwife Sessions, other witnesses at the trial included Dr. George R. Bostwick, Mary Deuel, Prudence Marks Miles, Jacob Shoemaker, Charles Higbee, and Margaret Kennedy Dana.  


[p. [225]]
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Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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took over the responsibility of journal keeping from William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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on 21 December 1842, the same day JS “made a particular request” that Richards “act as his private se[c]retary & historian.”1

JS, Journal, 21 Dec. 1842.  


While Clayton—and Richards before him—had kept JS’s previous Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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journal in the large “Book of the Law of the Lord,” which also contained records of donations for the Nauvoo temple, Richards began this journal in a much smaller memorandum book. The journal, which Richards kept through 22 June 1844, five days before JS’s death, eventually comprised four such memorandum books. The entire first book and part of the second (through April 1843) are presented here; the remainder of Richards’s second notebook, as well as the third and fourth books, will be published in volume 3 in the Journals series of The Joseph Smith Papers.
Several pieces of evidence indicate that these four memorandum books were considered volumes of the same journal rather than separate journals themselves. For example, whereas JS’s journals kept during the 1830s were recorded in bound books or notebooks labeled with different titles—such as “Sketch Book” or “The Scriptory Book”—the first and last of Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s memorandum books bear virtually identical titles, with the fourth explicitly identified as “vol 4”. Similarly, that books 2 and 3 lack titles suggests that each was simply a continuation of the previous book. This suggestion is made even stronger in book 2, in which the first entry commences at 4:00 p.m. on 10 March, with the events of the earlier part of the day recorded at the end of book 1. All four memorandum books are virtually the same size, and the bindings on the first three are similar.
As with nearly all the entries in JS’s previous Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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and Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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journals, JS neither wrote nor dictated the text of the entries in the memorandum books; they are based on Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s observations. For example, the entry for 22 September 1843 records only that Richards “Saw Joseph pass in a waggon with Hiram.”2

JS, Journal, 22 Sept. 1843, JS Collection, CHL.  


Despite the secondhand nature of the entries, however, Richards, a close associate and frequent companion of JS, was able to capture in detail JS’s words and actions on many occasions.
Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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had kept JS’s journal in the Book of the Law of the Lord from December 1841 to June 1842 in his earlier capacity as “Recorder. for the Temple, and the Scribe for the private office of the President.”3

JS, Journal, 13 Dec. 1841.  


When he began keeping this journal on 21 December 1842, however, he did so as JS’s newly appointed “private se[c]retary & historian.”4

JS, Journal, 21 Dec. 1842.  


The change in titles may seem insignificant, but Richards was very much aware of his new role: where he had occasionally identified himself as “recorder” and “scribe” in JS’s previous journal, he now referred to himself as the “sec.” The shift in titles and responsibilities may have been at least part of the reason the journal was transferred to the memorandum books; William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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, who replaced Richards as temple recorder in September 1842,5

Clayton, History of the Nauvoo Temple, 30–31.  


retained custody of the Book of the Law of the Lord and continued its record of temple donations.
The change in Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s title, as well as the transfer of the journal out of the Book of the Law of the Lord, may have influenced what events Richards recorded in the memorandum books. At least some of the material Richards, as JS’s private secretary, included in this journal—such as the detailed record of a medical malpractice suit over which JS presided—probably would have received much less emphasis had Richards, in the capacity of temple recorder and scribe, been keeping JS’s journal in the book that also contained records of donations for the temple. Similarly, although the ledger-size Book of the Law of the Lord likely remained in the recorder’s office, and most journal entries were probably made there, each of the memorandum books was small enough that Richards could easily carry it with him, allowing him to record many of JS’s activities closer to the actual event—both temporally and spatially—than was possible earlier.
Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s new title of historian was significant as well. On 1 December 1842, Richards began working on the “History of Joseph Smith” that was being serially published in the Times and Seasons, and by August 1843 he was drawing on JS’s earlier journals for that history.6

JS, Journal, 1 Dec. 1842 and 20 Jan. 1843; Richards, Journal, 1 Dec. 1842; Jessee, “Writing of Joseph Smith’s History,” 441.  


Richards therefore expected that the contemporaneous journal entries he was keeping for JS would eventually be used as the basis for JS’s history.
Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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employed various techniques in keeping the journal. For a few entries, he made lightly penciled notes and returned later with a quill pen to expand the entry. In other entries, the morning or afternoon portion of an entry was written in one ink and the evening portion of the entry in a different ink that matches that of the following entry. These changes in writing media and in other aspects of the inscribed text indicate that many entries—or parts of entries—were made on the very day of the events they described. The textual evidence in other entries indicates that they were written several days after the date they bear. Still other entries are a hybrid. Richards’s notes of sermons and legal proceedings, for example, bear evidence of both contemporaneous inscription and later revision. In some instances, Richards left blank spaces and even blank lines, apparently intending to add details later. Hurried note-taking often resulted in missing words, informal abbreviations, inconsistent spelling, and poorly formed characters. Richards revisited some difficult passages to mend or rewrite characters, revise spelling and punctuation, and add interlineations. Some of the blanks were filled while others were left standing. Richards’s notes include both immediate emendations, such as wipe-erasures made while his ink was still wet, as well as later revisions, such as knife-erasures of words written in ink that had dried. The various ways in which Richards wrote and revised entries resulted in the journal’s uneven texture but also contributed to its wealth of immediately recorded information and clarifying additions.
Over time, Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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settled somewhat into a pattern of generally recording the events of one day on one page—some pages largely empty and others filled with cramped writing—with weather reported at the bottom of the page. He made an entry for almost every day during the last year and a half of JS’s life. The journal ended when JS left Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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on 22 June 1844, five days before he was killed at the jailhouse at Carthage

Located eighteen miles southeast of Nauvoo. Settled 1831. Designated Hancock Co. seat, Mar. 1833. Incorporated as town, 27 Feb. 1837. Population in 1839 about 300. Population in 1844 about 400. Site of anti-Mormon meetings and resolutions, early 1840s. Site...

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, Illinois. Richards accompanied JS to Carthage and, during the final days of JS’s life, kept extensive notes of JS’s activities in his personal journal.
Note: The journal Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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kept for JS is divided into four physical books. The transcript and annotation here are for the first of these books, covering 21 December 1842 through 10 March 1843. The transcript and annotation for the first part of book 2, covering 10 March through 30 April 1843, are also available on this website. The transcript and annotation for the remainder of book 2 and for books 3 and 4 will be published later.

Facts