53992207

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 2, 10 March 1843–14 July 1843

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 2, 10 March 1843–14 July 1843

15 March 1843 • Wednesday

Wednesday March 15th Dictated letter to George J. Adams

7 Nov. 1810–11 May 1880. Tailor, actor, clergyman. Born in Oxford, Sussex Co., New Jersey. Lived in Boston during 1820s and 1830s. Became Methodist lay preacher. Married Caroline. Moved to New York City, before 1840. Baptized into LDS church, Feb. 1840, in...

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— read letter from Justin Butterfield

1790–Oct. 1855. Teacher, lawyer. Born in Keene, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Ca. 1810, moved to Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York, where he taught school and studied law. Admitted to bar, 1812, at Watertown. Practiced law in Adams, Jefferson Co., and Sackets...

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25

JS responded to Butterfield by 19 March.  


& Arlington Bennett James Arlington Bennet

21 Dec. 1788–25 Dec. 1863. Attorney, newspaper publisher, educator, author. Born in New York. Married first Sophia, ca. 1811. Served as third and later second lieutenant in First U.S. Artillery, 1 Aug. 1813–14 Oct. 1814. Published American System of Practical...

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.—26

In this letter, Bennet referred to the “peculiar distressed situation” about which JS had written him earlier—a reference, presumably, to John C. Bennett’s recent threats to have JS arrested on charges dating back to the Missouri conflict of 1838–1839. James Arlington Bennet recounted to JS the steps he had taken to thwart Bennett’s designs and assured JS that any effort to prosecute JS would be unsuccessful. Bennet also noted that John C. Bennett’s book attacking the Mormons was a failure, and he castigated New York Herald editor James Gordon Bennett, who continued to “make sport” of JS in the pages of his paper. JS responded two days after receiving the letter. (James Arlington Bennet, Arlington House, Long Island, NY, to JS, Nauvoo, IL, 20 Feb. 1843, JS Materials, CCLA; JS, Journal, 18 Jan. and 17 Mar. 1843.)  


Signed Deeds for. sister Lydia Dibble granger. & Mary Bailey Smith

20 Dec. 1808–25 Jan. 1841. Born at Bedford, Hillsborough Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Joshua Bailey and Hannah Boutwell. Baptized into LDS church by Samuel H. Smith, 26 June 1832, at Boston. Migrated from Boston to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Married...

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. & Alreed Reuben W. Allred.27

Nauvoo Registry of Deeds, Record of Deeds, bk. A, p. pp. 187–188; bk. B, pp. 42–43; Indenture, JS (Trustee-in-trust) to Lydia Dibble Granger, Hancock Co., IL, 15 Mar. 1843, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA.  


Spent the day mostly in the office.
gave the following name to the “Wasp” enlarged. as is contemplated
“The Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
Neighbor”
“Our Motto, the saints singularity”
“Is unity. liberty. Charity.”28

An announcement declared The Wasp was to be discontinued with the 19 April issue, its size doubled, and its title changed to Nauvoo Neighbor. The final issue of The Wasp was the 26 April 1843 issue, and the inaugural issue of the Nauvoo Neighbor, edited by John Taylor, appeared on 3 May 1843. Under the nameplate, the newspaper regularly printed the phrases approved by JS: “OUR MOTTO—THE SAINTS’ SINGULARITY—IS UNITY, LIBERTY, CHARITY.” The change of names may be partly attributable to the fact that James Arlington Bennet did not like The Wasp as a name for the paper. “Mildness should characterise every thing that comes from Nauvoo,” he wrote to JS, “and even a name . . . has much influence on one side or the other.” (“Prospectus of a Weekly Newspaper, Called the Nauvoo Neighbor,” The Wasp, 5 Apr. 1843, [1]; James Arlington Bennet to JS, 16 Aug. 1842.)  


Joseph. prophecied in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. that Orrin Porter Rockwell

June 1814–9 June 1878. Ferry operator, herdsman, farmer. Born in Belchertown, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Orin Rockwell and Sarah Witt. Moved to Farmington (later in Manchester), Ontario Co., New York, 1817. Neighbor to JS. Baptized into LDS church...

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will get away from the Missourians,29

Rockwell was arrested in St. Louis in early March 1843 for the attempted murder of Missouri’s former governor Lilburn W. Boggs. Ultimately Rockwell was not indicted for shooting Boggs, but he was indicted for attempting to escape while the grand jury at Independence, Missouri, investigated the charges against him. The case was transferred to the Fifth Judicial Circuit with Austin A. King presiding as judge and Alexander Doniphan serving as Rockwell’s court-appointed attorney. The trial was held 11 December 1843; the jury convicted Rockwell of jailbreaking and sentenced him to five minutes’ imprisonment. Rockwell was released on 13 December and arrived in Nauvoo on 25 December 1843. (JS, Journal, 13 Mar. 1843; Smith, “Mormon Troubles in Missouri,” 249–251; and JS, Journal, 25 Dec. 1843, JS Collection, CHL.)  


told Hawes Peter Haws

17 Feb. 1796–1862. Farmer, miller, businessman. Born in Leeds Co., Johnstown District (later in Ontario), Upper Canada. Son of Edward Haws and Polly. Married Charlotte Harrington. Baptized into LDS church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Served mission...

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he must curtail his boys or they will get into State Prison.30

Haws’s sons Alpheus and Albert were seventeen and twelve years old, respectively. (Black, Early Members of the Reorganized Church, 3:376.)  


[p. 9]

15 March 1843 • Wednesday

Wednesday March 15th  Dictated letter to G[eorge] J. Adams

7 Nov. 1810–11 May 1880. Tailor, actor, clergyman. Born in Oxford, Sussex Co., New Jersey. Lived in Boston during 1820s and 1830s. Became Methodist lay preacher. Married Caroline. Moved to New York City, before 1840. Baptized into LDS church, Feb. 1840, in...

View Full Bio
 read letter from [Justin] Butterfield

1790–Oct. 1855. Teacher, lawyer. Born in Keene, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Ca. 1810, moved to Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York, where he taught school and studied law. Admitted to bar, 1812, at Watertown. Practiced law in Adams, Jefferson Co., and Sackets...

View Full Bio
25

JS responded to Butterfield by 19 March.  


&  Arlington Bennett [James Arlington Bennet]

21 Dec. 1788–25 Dec. 1863. Attorney, newspaper publisher, educator, author. Born in New York. Married first Sophia, ca. 1811. Served as third and later second lieutenant in First U.S. Artillery, 1 Aug. 1813–14 Oct. 1814. Published American System of Practical...

View Full Bio
.—26

In this letter, Bennet referred to the “peculiar distressed situation” about which JS had written him earlier—a reference, presumably, to John C. Bennett’s recent threats to have JS arrested on charges dating back to the Missouri conflict of 1838–1839. James Arlington Bennet recounted to JS the steps he had taken to thwart Bennett’s designs and assured JS that any effort to prosecute JS would be unsuccessful. Bennet also noted that John C. Bennett’s book attacking the Mormons was a failure, and he castigated New York Herald editor James Gordon Bennett, who continued to “make sport” of JS in the pages of his paper. JS responded two days after receiving the letter. (James Arlington Bennet, Arlington House, Long Island, NY, to JS, Nauvoo, IL, 20 Feb. 1843, JS Materials, CCLA; JS, Journal, 18 Jan. and 17 Mar. 1843.)  


Signed Deeds  for. sister [Lydia Dibble] granger. & [Mary Bailey] Smith

20 Dec. 1808–25 Jan. 1841. Born at Bedford, Hillsborough Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Joshua Bailey and Hannah Boutwell. Baptized into LDS church by Samuel H. Smith, 26 June 1832, at Boston. Migrated from Boston to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Married...

View Full Bio
. & Alreed [Reuben W. Allred].27

Nauvoo Registry of Deeds, Record of Deeds, bk. A, p. pp. 187–188; bk. B, pp. 42–43; Indenture, JS (Trustee-in-trust) to Lydia Dibble Granger, Hancock Co., IL, 15 Mar. 1843, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA.  


Spent the day mostly in the office.
gave the following name to the  “Wasp” enlarged. as is contemplated
“The Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
Neighbor”
“Our Motto, the saints singularity”
“Is unity. liberty. Charity.”28

An announcement declared The Wasp was to be discontinued with the 19 April issue, its size doubled, and its title changed to Nauvoo Neighbor. The final issue of The Wasp was the 26 April 1843 issue, and the inaugural issue of the Nauvoo Neighbor, edited by John Taylor, appeared on 3 May 1843. Under the nameplate, the newspaper regularly printed the phrases approved by JS: “OUR MOTTO—THE SAINTS’ SINGULARITY—IS UNITY, LIBERTY, CHARITY.” The change of names may be partly attributable to the fact that James Arlington Bennet did not like The Wasp as a name for the paper. “Mildness should characterise every thing that comes from Nauvoo,” he wrote to JS, “and even a name . . . has much influence on one side or the other.” (“Prospectus of a Weekly Newspaper, Called the Nauvoo Neighbor,” The Wasp, 5 Apr. 1843, [1]; James Arlington Bennet to JS, 16 Aug. 1842.)  


Joseph. prophecied in the name  of the Lord Jesus Christ. that [Orrin] Porter  Rockwell

June 1814–9 June 1878. Ferry operator, herdsman, farmer. Born in Belchertown, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Orin Rockwell and Sarah Witt. Moved to Farmington (later in Manchester), Ontario Co., New York, 1817. Neighbor to JS. Baptized into LDS church...

View Full Bio
will get away from the  Missourians,29

Rockwell was arrested in St. Louis in early March 1843 for the attempted murder of Missouri’s former governor Lilburn W. Boggs. Ultimately Rockwell was not indicted for shooting Boggs, but he was indicted for attempting to escape while the grand jury at Independence, Missouri, investigated the charges against him. The case was transferred to the Fifth Judicial Circuit with Austin A. King presiding as judge and Alexander Doniphan serving as Rockwell’s court-appointed attorney. The trial was held 11 December 1843; the jury convicted Rockwell of jailbreaking and sentenced him to five minutes’ imprisonment. Rockwell was released on 13 December and arrived in Nauvoo on 25 December 1843. (JS, Journal, 13 Mar. 1843; Smith, “Mormon Troubles in Missouri,” 249–251; and JS, Journal, 25 Dec. 1843, JS Collection, CHL.)  


told Hawes [Peter Haws]

17 Feb. 1796–1862. Farmer, miller, businessman. Born in Leeds Co., Johnstown District (later in Ontario), Upper Canada. Son of Edward Haws and Polly. Married Charlotte Harrington. Baptized into LDS church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Served mission...

View Full Bio
he must curtail his  boys or they will get into State Prison.30

Haws’s sons Alpheus and Albert were seventeen and twelve years old, respectively. (Black, Early Members of the Reorganized Church, 3:376.)  


[p. 9]
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JS, “President Joseph Smith’s Journal,” Journal, 4 vols., Dec. 1842–June 1844; handwriting and signatures of Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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; 1,045 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes shorthand and illustrations; also includes redactions, use marks, and archival stickers.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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kept “President Joseph Smith’s Journal” in four small memorandum books. The paper in book 1 is blue, while the paper in books 2–4 is white. In the first two books, the paper was printed with seventeen blue lines and extra space for page headers, whereas the paper for book 3 was printed with nineteen blue lines and no header space. The first eight gatherings of paper for book 4 were printed with sixteen blue lines and header space, while the last nine gatherings were printed with nineteen blue lines and no header space. The four volumes have 147, 160, 142, and 190 free leaves, respectively, and were sewn with all-along sewing. The leaves in books 1–3 were trimmed to measure 6 × 3¾ inches (15 × 10 cm), while the paper in book 4 measures 6¼ × 3¾ inches (16 × 10 cm). Books 2–4 have the same red-speckled stain on the page edges. All four books were bound with a tight-back case binding and have brown leather over pasteboards. Books 1–3 measure 6¼ × 4 × ¾ inches (16 × 10 × 2 cm); book 4 measures 6⅜ × 4 × ¾ inches (16 × 10 × 2 cm). The outside covers of book 1 feature an embossed pattern around the borders. The cover of book 4 is red and features a gold pattern around the borders on the front and the back.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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inscribed most of the journal entries in these memorandum books with a quill pen in ink that is now brown, although he also used blue ink for several entries. Some of the graphite inscriptions in the volumes are also contemporaneous. Richards paginated the first 114 of the 285 inscribed pages in book 1—discounting the title page that precedes the pagination—and the first 20 of the 309 inscribed pages in book 2. There is no pagination in books 3–4. In book 2, pages 11, 17, and 20–21 feature illustrations of celestial observations.
The Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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memorandum books include later inscriptions that are not transcribed in this edition. At the end of book 2, Thomas Bullock added a list of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
-era plural marriages. A few revisions, additions, or notes are penciled in throughout the volumes. There are also several use marks throughout the volumes—probably made when the journal entries were later revised for inclusion in the “History of Joseph Smith” published in Mormon newspapers in the mid-nineteenth century.1

This serialized history drew on the journals beginning with the 4 July 1855 issue of the Deseret News and with the 3 January 1857 issue of the LDS Millennial Star.  


The spines of the volumes are now labeled with blue-colored paper stickers that probably date from the early Utah period.2

The labels on the spines of the four volumes read respectively as follows: “Joseph Smith’s Journal—1842–3 by Willard Richards” (book 1); “Joseph Smith’s Journal by W. Richards 1843” (book 2); “Joseph Smith’s Journal by W. Richards 1843–4” (book 3); and “W. Richards’ Journal 1844 <Vol. 4>” (book 4; Richards kept JS’s journal in the front of this volume, and after JS’s death Richards kept his own journal in the back of the volume).  


Each of the four volumes also bears the mark of a square sticker removed from the upper right-hand corner of the outside front cover. Finally, a “Historian’s Office Archives” self-adhesive paper sticker appears in the front inside cover or on the first flyleaf of each book.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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identified himself as the scribe for the journal on the title pages of books 1 and 4. Because Richards kept the journals for JS and kept his own journal in the back of book 4 after JS’s death, the books may be included in the listing of “Drs private books & Papers”3

“Drs” in the quotation is a reference to Richards, a Thomsonian doctor. (“History of Willard Richards,” Deseret News, 23 June 1858, 73)  


in the inventory of church records made in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, Illinois, in 1846.4

“Schedule of Church Records,” Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


The volumes are listed in inventories made in Salt Lake City, Utah, by the Church Historian’s Office in 1855, 1858, and 1878, as well as in the 1973 register of the JS Collection.5

“Inventory. Historian’s Office. 4th April 1855,” [1]; “Contents of the Historian and Recorder’s Office G. S. L. City July 1858,” 2; “Index of Records and Journals in the Historian’s Office 1878,” [11]–[12], Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


These archival records and the physical evidence of archival stickers indicate continuous institutional custody and authenticity.
Note: The journal Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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kept for JS is divided into four physical books. The transcript and annotation here are for the first part of book 2, covering 10 March through 30 April 1843. The transcript and annotation for the entirety of book 1, covering 21 December 1842 through 10 March 1843, are also available on this website. The transcript and annotation for the remainder of book 2 and for books 3 and 4 will be published later.

Facts