53992207

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 2, 10 March 1843–14 July 1843

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 2, 10 March 1843–14 July 1843

Parley

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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may stay at home & build his house.339

Pratt and his family arrived in Nauvoo on 12 April 1843 after his mission to England. Initially without a home of their own, the family lived for a time in “one small room” that served as “kitchen parlour, dining room, bedroom, & publick office.” (Parley P. Pratt, Nauvoo, IL, to John Van Cott, Canaan Four Corners, NY, 7 May 1843, CHL.)  


Bro Geo. A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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. I dont know how I can help him to a living. but to go. put on a long face & make them doe dole over to him if he will go his lungs will hold out. the Lord will give him a good pair of lungs yet.—340

Probably refers to George A. Smith’s health problems, which included coughing or spitting up blood on occasion. On 14 July 1843, George A. Smith wrote to his wife, Bathsheba Bigler Smith, from Cincinnati that he had “Not Ben troubled With Bleeding” on this mission, but then noted in an 18 September letter that he “spit some Blood” when speaking in Boylston Hall to one thousand people. (George A. Smith, Cincinnati, OH, to Bathsheba Bigler Smith, Nauvoo, IL, 14 July 1843; George A. Smith, Boston, MA, to Bathsheba Bigler Smith, Nauvoo, IL, 18 Sept. 1843, George Albert Smith, Papers, CHL.)  


Woodruff

1 Mar. 1807–2 Sept. 1898. Farmer, miller. Born at Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Aphek Woodruff and Beulah Thompson. Moved to Richland, Oswego Co., New York, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Zera Pulsipher, 31 Dec. 1833, near Richland. Ordained...

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can be spared from the printing office

Located at four different sites from 1839–1846: cellar of warehouse on bank of Mississippi River, June–Aug. 1839; frame building on northeast corner of Water and Bain streets, Nov. 1839–Nov. 1841; newly built printing establishment on northwest corner of ...

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,341

Woodruff had overseen the business aspects of the printing office when the Quorum of the Twelve first purchased the office from Ebenezer Robinson in early February 1842. Woodruff continued to work in the office after JS turned the editorship over to John Taylor in November 1842, at which time Woodruff was identified with Taylor as a printer and publisher of the paper. (JS, Journal, 4 Feb. 1842; Woodruff, Journal, 19 Feb. 1842; Masthead, Times and Seasons, 15 Nov. 1842, 4:16.)  


if you both stay you will die.
Orson Pratt

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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. I want him to go.
Bro Brigham

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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asked if he should go? Yes, Go. I want John E. Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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. to be called away from pittsburgh

Also spelled Pittsbourg, Pittsbourgh, and Pittsburg. Major industrial port city in southwestern Pennsylvania. Near location where Monongahela and Allegheny rivers converge to form Ohio River. French established Fort DuQuesne, 1754. British captured fort, ...

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. send a good elder to take his place.343

Page was called to serve in Pittsburgh at the 7 April 1842 conference of the church. (“Conference Minutes,” Times and Seasons, 15 Apr. 1842, 3:761–763.)  


Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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can go. & travel.—
You will all go to Boston

Capital city located on eastern seaboard of Massachusetts at mouth of Charles River. Founded by English Puritans, 1630; received city charter, 1822. Population in 1820 about 43,000; in 1830 about 61,000; and in 1840 about 93,000. JS’s ancestor Robert Smith...

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.344

On this mission, eight members of the Quorum of the Twelve—Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Parley P. Pratt, Orson Pratt, Orson Hyde, John E. Page, Wilford Woodruff, and George A. Smith—held a conference in Boston on 9–11 September 1843. Most had traveled there in groups and held smaller conferences between early July and early September in many locations, including New York, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh. (JS History, vol. E-1, 1716–1733; Woodruff, Journal, 7 July–10 Sept. 1843; George A. Smith to Bathsheba Bigler Smith, Nauvoo, IL, 14 and 21 July 1843; 2, 14, and 30 Aug. 1843; 10 and 18 Sept. 1843, George Albert Smith, Papers, CHL.)  


I want Elder Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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to continue in the history [p. [163]]
<Parley

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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may stay at home & build  his house.>339

Pratt and his family arrived in Nauvoo on 12 April 1843 after his mission to England. Initially without a home of their own, the family lived for a time in “one small room” that served as “kitchen parlour, dining room, bedroom, & publick office.” (Parley P. Pratt, Nauvoo, IL, to John Van Cott, Canaan Four Corners, NY, 7 May 1843, CHL.)  


Bro Geo. A. Smith

26 June 1817–1 Sept. 1875. Born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York. Son of John Smith and Clarissa Lyman. Baptized into LDS church by Joseph H. Wakefield, 10 Sept. 1832, at Potsdam. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Labored on Kirtland temple...

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. I dont know how I can  help him to a living. but to go. put on a  long face & make them doe [dole?] over to him  if he will go his lungs will hold out. the  Lord will give him a good pair of lungs  yet.—340

Probably refers to George A. Smith’s health problems, which included coughing or spitting up blood on occasion. On 14 July 1843, George A. Smith wrote to his wife, Bathsheba Bigler Smith, from Cincinnati that he had “Not Ben troubled With Bleeding” on this mission, but then noted in an 18 September letter that he “spit some Blood” when speaking in Boylston Hall to one thousand people. (George A. Smith, Cincinnati, OH, to Bathsheba Bigler Smith, Nauvoo, IL, 14 July 1843; George A. Smith, Boston, MA, to Bathsheba Bigler Smith, Nauvoo, IL, 18 Sept. 1843, George Albert Smith, Papers, CHL.)  


Woodruff

1 Mar. 1807–2 Sept. 1898. Farmer, miller. Born at Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Aphek Woodruff and Beulah Thompson. Moved to Richland, Oswego Co., New York, 1832. Baptized into LDS church by Zera Pulsipher, 31 Dec. 1833, near Richland. Ordained...

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can be spared from the printing  office

Located at four different sites from 1839–1846: cellar of warehouse on bank of Mississippi River, June–Aug. 1839; frame building on northeast corner of Water and Bain streets, Nov. 1839–Nov. 1841; newly built printing establishment on northwest corner of ...

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,341

Woodruff had overseen the business aspects of the printing office when the Quorum of the Twelve first purchased the office from Ebenezer Robinson in early February 1842. Woodruff continued to work in the office after JS turned the editorship over to John Taylor in November 1842, at which time Woodruff was identified with Taylor as a printer and publisher of the paper. (JS, Journal, 4 Feb. 1842; Woodruff, Journal, 19 Feb. 1842; Masthead, Times and Seasons, 15 Nov. 1842, 4:16.)  


if you both stay you will die.342

TEXT: Possibly “die <dis>” or “dis”. George A. Smith, who was present at this meeting, is apparently responsible for expanding this to “disagree” in draft material for the “History of Joseph Smith” published in early Mormon newspapers. (See Historian’s Office, JS History, draft notes, 19 Apr. 1843; George A. Smith, Great Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, to Wilford Woodruff, 21 Apr. 1856, in Historian’s Office, Historical Record Book, 218–221; Jessee, “Writing of Joseph Smith’s History,” 441.)  


Orson Pratt

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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. I want him to go.
Bro Brigham

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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asked if he should go? Yes, Go.  I want John E. Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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. to be called away  from pittsburgh

Also spelled Pittsbourg, Pittsbourgh, and Pittsburg. Major industrial port city in southwestern Pennsylvania. Near location where Monongahela and Allegheny rivers converge to form Ohio River. French established Fort DuQuesne, 1754. British captured fort, ...

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. send a good elder to  take his place.343

Page was called to serve in Pittsburgh at the 7 April 1842 conference of the church. (“Conference Minutes,” Times and Seasons, 15 Apr. 1842, 3:761–763.)  


Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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can go. & travel.—
You will all go to Boston

Capital city located on eastern seaboard of Massachusetts at mouth of Charles River. Founded by English Puritans, 1630; received city charter, 1822. Population in 1820 about 43,000; in 1830 about 61,000; and in 1840 about 93,000. JS’s ancestor Robert Smith...

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.344

On this mission, eight members of the Quorum of the Twelve—Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Parley P. Pratt, Orson Pratt, Orson Hyde, John E. Page, Wilford Woodruff, and George A. Smith—held a conference in Boston on 9–11 September 1843. Most had traveled there in groups and held smaller conferences between early July and early September in many locations, including New York, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh. (JS History, vol. E-1, 1716–1733; Woodruff, Journal, 7 July–10 Sept. 1843; George A. Smith to Bathsheba Bigler Smith, Nauvoo, IL, 14 and 21 July 1843; 2, 14, and 30 Aug. 1843; 10 and 18 Sept. 1843, George Albert Smith, Papers, CHL.)  


I want Elder Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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to continue in the history [p. [163]]
PreviousNext
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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took over the responsibility of journal keeping from William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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on 21 December 1842, the same day JS “made a particular request” that Richards “act as his private se[c]retary & historian.”1

JS, Journal, 21 Dec. 1842.  


While Clayton—and Richards before him—had kept JS’s previous Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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journal in the large “Book of the Law of the Lord,” which also contained records of donations for the Nauvoo temple, Richards began this journal in a much smaller memorandum book. The journal, which Richards kept through 22 June 1844, five days before JS’s death, eventually comprised four such memorandum books. The entire first book and part of the second (through April 1843) are presented here; the remainder of Richards’s second notebook, as well as the third and fourth books, will be published in volume 3 in the Journals series of The Joseph Smith Papers.
Several pieces of evidence indicate that these four memorandum books were considered volumes of the same journal rather than separate journals themselves. For example, whereas JS’s journals kept during the 1830s were recorded in bound books or notebooks labeled with different titles—such as “Sketch Book” or “The Scriptory Book”2

See JSP, J1:53, 225.  


—the first and last of Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s memorandum books bear virtually identical titles, with the fourth explicitly identified as “vol 4”. Similarly, that books 2 and 3 lack titles suggests that each was simply a continuation of the previous book. This suggestion is made even stronger in book 2, in which the first entry commences at 4:00 p.m. on 10 March, with the events of the earlier part of the day recorded at the end of book 1. All four memorandum books are virtually the same size, and the bindings on the first three are similar.
As with nearly all the entries in JS’s previous Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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and Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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journals, JS neither wrote nor dictated the text of the entries in the memorandum books; they are based on Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s observations. For example, the entry for 22 September 1843 records only that Richards “Saw Joseph pass in a waggon with Hiram.”3

JS, Journal, 22 Sept. 1843, JS Collection, CHL.  


Despite the secondhand nature of the entries, however, Richards, a close associate and frequent companion of JS, was able to capture in detail JS’s words and actions on many occasions.
Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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had kept JS’s journal in the Book of the Law of the Lord from December 1841 to June 1842 in his earlier capacity as “Recorder. for the Temple, and the Scribe for the private office of the President.”4

JS, Journal, 13 Dec. 1841.  


When he began keeping this journal on 21 December 1842, however, he did so as JS’s newly appointed “private se[c]retary & historian.”5

JS, Journal, 21 Dec. 1842.  


The change in titles may seem insignificant, but Richards was very much aware of his new role: where he had occasionally identified himself as “recorder” and “scribe” in JS’s previous journal, he now referred to himself as the “sec.” The shift in titles and responsibilities may have been at least part of the reason the journal was transferred to the memorandum books; William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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, who replaced Richards as temple recorder in September 1842,6

Clayton, History of the Nauvoo Temple, 30–31.  


retained custody of the Book of the Law of the Lord and continued its record of temple donations.
The change in Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s title, as well as the transfer of the journal out of the Book of the Law of the Lord, may have influenced what events Richards recorded in the memorandum books. At least some of the material Richards, as JS’s private secretary, included in this journal—such as the detailed record of a medical malpractice suit over which JS presided—probably would have received much less emphasis had Richards, in the capacity of temple recorder and scribe, been keeping JS’s journal in the book that also contained records of donations for the temple. Similarly, although the ledger-size Book of the Law of the Lord likely remained in the recorder’s office, and most journal entries were probably made there, each of the memorandum books was small enough that Richards could easily carry it with him, allowing him to record many of JS’s activities closer to the actual event—both temporally and spatially—than was possible earlier.
Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s new title of historian was significant as well. On 1 December 1842, Richards began working on the “History of Joseph Smith” that was being serially published in the Times and Seasons, and by August 1843 he was drawing on JS’s earlier journals for that history.7

JS, Journal, 1 Dec. 1842 and 20 Jan. 1843; Richards, Journal, 1 Dec. 1842; Jessee, “Writing of Joseph Smith’s History,” 441.  


Richards therefore expected that the contemporaneous journal entries he was keeping for JS would eventually be used as the basis for JS’s history.
Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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employed various techniques in keeping the journal. For a few entries, he made lightly penciled notes and returned later with a quill pen to expand the entry. In other entries, the morning or afternoon portion of an entry was written in one ink and the evening portion of the entry in a different ink that matches that of the following entry. These changes in writing media and in other aspects of the inscribed text indicate that many entries—or parts of entries—were made on the very day of the events they described. The textual evidence in other entries indicates that they were written several days after the date they bear. Still other entries are a hybrid. Richards’s notes of sermons and legal proceedings, for example, bear evidence of both contemporaneous inscription and later revision. In some instances, Richards left blank spaces and even blank lines, apparently intending to add details later. Hurried note-taking often resulted in missing words, informal abbreviations, inconsistent spelling, and poorly formed characters. Richards revisited some difficult passages to mend or rewrite characters, revise spelling and punctuation, and add interlineations. Some of the blanks were filled while others were left standing. Richards’s notes include both immediate emendations, such as wipe-erasures made while his ink was still wet, as well as later revisions, such as knife-erasures of words written in ink that had dried. The various ways in which Richards wrote and revised entries resulted in the journal’s uneven texture but also contributed to its wealth of immediately recorded information and clarifying additions.
Over time, Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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settled somewhat into a pattern of generally recording the events of one day on one page—some pages largely empty and others filled with cramped writing—with weather reported at the bottom of the page. He made an entry for almost every day during the last year and a half of JS’s life. The journal ended when JS left Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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on 22 June 1844, five days before he was killed at the jailhouse at Carthage

Located eighteen miles southeast of Nauvoo. Settled 1831. Designated Hancock Co. seat, Mar. 1833. Incorporated as town, 27 Feb. 1837. Population in 1839 about 300. Population in 1844 about 400. Site of anti-Mormon meetings and resolutions, early 1840s. Site...

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, Illinois. Richards accompanied JS to Carthage and, during the final days of JS’s life, kept extensive notes of JS’s activities in his personal journal.
Note: The journal Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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kept for JS is divided into four physical books. The transcript and annotation here are for the first part of book 2, covering 10 March through 30 April 1843. The transcript and annotation for the entirety of book 1, covering 21 December 1842 through 10 March 1843, are also available on this website. The transcript and annotation for the remainder of book 2 and for books 3 and 4 will be published later.

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