21225849

Letter to the Church and Edward Partridge, 20 March 1839

Letter to the Church and Edward Partridge, 20 March 1839

umstances are calculated to awaken our spirits to a sacred rememberance of evry thing and we think that yours are also and that nothing therefore can seperate us from the love of God, and fellowship one with another and that evry species of wickedness and cruelty practised upon us will only tend to bind our harts together and seal them together in love we have no need to say to you that we are held in bonds without cause neither is it needfull that you say unto us we are driven from our homes and smitten without cause. We mutually understand that if the inhabitance of the state of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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had let the saints alone and had been as deserable of peace as they were there would have been nothing but peace and quiatude in this State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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unto this day we should not have been in this hell surrounded with demonds if not those who are damned, they are those who shall be damned and where we are compeled to hear nothing but blasphemos oaths and witness a seen of blasphemy and drunkeness and hypocracy and debaucheries of evry description. And again the cries of orphans and widdows would not have assended up to God. the blood of inocent women and children yea and of men also would not have cried to God against them it would not have stained the soyl of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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. but oh! the unrelenting hand the inhumanity and murderous disposition of this people it shocks all nature it beggers and defies all discription. it is a tail of [p. 2]
umstances are calculated to awaken our spirits to a  sacred rememberance of evry thing and we think  that yours are also and that nothing therefore can  seperate us from the love of God, and fellowship one  with another and that evry species of wickedness  and cruelty practised upon us will only tend to  bind our harts together and seal them together in  love we have no need to say to you that we are  held in bonds without cause neither is it needfull that  you say unto us we are driven from our homes  and smitten without cause. We mutually unders[t]and  that if the inhabitance of the state of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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had let  the saints alone and had been as deserable of peace  as they were there would have been nothing but  peace and quiatude in this <State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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> unto this day we should  not have been in this hell surrounded with demonds  if not those who are damned, they are those who shall  be damned and where we are compeled to hear nothing  but blasphemos oaths and witness a seen of blasphemy  and drunkeness and hypocracy and debaucheries  of evry description. And again the cries of orphans and  widdows would <not> have assended up to God. the blood  of inocent women and children yea and of men  also would not have cried to God against them  <it> would <not> have stained the soyl of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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. but oh!  the unrelenting hand the inhumanity and murderous  disposition of this people it shocks all nature it  beggers and defies all discription. it is a tail of [p. 2]
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, IL, 20 Mar. 1839; handwriting of Alexander McRae and Caleb Baldwin with corrections by JS and signatures of JS, Hyrum Smith, Lyman Wight, Caleb Baldwin, and Alexander McRae; 26 pages; Revelations Collection, CHL. Includes endorsements.

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