53991845

Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

to the right and left, and my brother and his friends were marched down through their lines, with a strong guard in front, and the cannon in in the rear to the camp, amidst the whooppings, hollowiings, yellings, and shoutings of the army, which was so horrid and terrific that it frightened the inhabitants of the city

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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. It is impossible to describe the feelings of horror and distress of the people. After being thus betrayed they were placed under strong guard of thirty men armed cap-a-pie, which they relieved every two hours. There they were compelled to lay on the cold ground that night, and were told in plain language that they need never expect their liberty again. So far for their honors pledged. However, this was as much as could be expected from a mob under the garb of Military and executive authority in the state of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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. On the next day the soldiers were permitted to patrol the streets, to abuse and insult the people at their leisure, and enter into houses and pillage them, and ravish the women taking every gun and every other kind of arms or military implements: and about 12, o’clock that day Col. Hinkle

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

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came to my house with an armed force, opened the door and called me out of doors and delivered me up as a prisoner unto that force. They surrounded me and commanded me to march into the camp. I told them that I could not go: my family were sick, and I was sick myself, and could not leave home. They said they did not care for that I must and should go. I asked when they would permit me to return. They made me no answer but forced me along with the point of the bayonet into the camp, and put me under the same guard with my brother Joseph— and within half an hour afterwards, Amasa Lyman

30 Mar. 1813–4 Feb. 1877. Boatman, gunsmith, farmer. Born at Lyman, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of Boswell Lyman and Martha Mason. Baptized into LDS church by Lyman E. Johnson, 27 Apr. 1832. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, May–June 1832. Ordained an...

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was also brought and placed under the same guard. They were compelled to stay all that night, and lie on the ground: but along some time in the same night, Col. Hinkle

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

View Full Bio
came to see me and told me that he had been pleading my case before the court martial, but he was afraid he should not succeed. He said there was a court martial [p. 265]
to the right and left, and my brother and his friends were marched  down through their lines, with a strong guard in front, and the can non in in the rear to the camp, amidst the whooppings, hollowi ings, yellings, and shoutings of the army, which was so horrid and  terrific that it frightened the inhabitants of the city

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
. It is impo ssible to describe the feelings of horror and distress of the people. After  being thus betrayed they were placed under strong guard of thirty  men armed cap-a-pie, which they relieved every two hours.  There they were compelled to lay on the cold ground that night,  and were told in plain language that they need never expect th eir liberty again. So far for their honors pledged. However,  this was as much as could be expected from a mob under the garb  of Military and executive authority in the state of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
. On  the next day the soldiers were permitted to patrol the streets, to  abuse and insult the people at their leisure, and enter into hou ses and pillage them, and ravish the women taking every gun  and every other kind of Military arms or military implements:  and about 12, o’clock that day Col. Hinkle

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

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came to my house with  an armed force, opened the door and called me out of doors and  delivered me up as a prisoner unto that force. They surrounded  me and commanded me to march into the camp. I told them  that I could not go: my family were sick, and I was sick mys elf, and could not leave home. They said they did not care for  that I must and should go. I asked when they would permit  me to return. They made me no answer but forced me along  with the point of the bayonet into the camp, and put me un der the same guard with my brother Joseph— and within half  an hour afterwards, Amasa Lyman

30 Mar. 1813–4 Feb. 1877. Boatman, gunsmith, farmer. Born at Lyman, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of Boswell Lyman and Martha Mason. Baptized into LDS church by Lyman E. Johnson, 27 Apr. 1832. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, May–June 1832. Ordained an...

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was also brought and pl aced under the same guard. They were compelled to stay all that  night, and lie on the ground: but along some time in the sa me night, Col. Hinkle

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

View Full Bio
came to see me and told me that he had  been pleading my case before the court martial, but he was af raid he should not succeed. He said there was a court martial [p. 265]
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Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845; handwriting of Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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and Martha Jane Knowlton Coray; 337 pages; CHL.
Note: Lucy Mack Smith

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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, the mother of Joseph Smith, dictated a rough draft version of her history to Martha Jane Knowlton Coray (with some additional scribal help from Martha’s husband, Howard

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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) beginning in 1844 and concluding in 1845. In 1845, the Corays inscribed this fair copy of the history under Lucy’s direction.

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