27467

Journal, 1835–1836

[Blank flyleaf followed by lined leaf with scriptural references regarding repentance on the recto]
Sketch Book for the use of
Joseph Smith, jr.1

Oliver Cowdery also used “Sketch Book” as a title for his own journal, which he began on 1 January 1836.  


22 September 1835 • Tuesday

September 22, 1835. This day Joseph Smith, jr. labored with Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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, in obtaining and writing blessings.2

On this date, 22 September, JS dictated blessings for David Whitmer, John Whitmer, John Corrill, and William W. Phelps. Cowdery copied these blessings on 2 and 3 October 1835 into what became the first book of patriarchal blessings. On the evening of 22 September, Cowdery wrote a prophetic blessing for JS, which he recorded in the same book on 3 October. Additional blessings given in November and December 1833 by JS for Frederick G. Williams, Sidney Rigdon, Cowdery, and JS’s parents and siblings were recorded by Cowdery in the book in late September and on 1 and 2 October. (Patriarchal Blessings, 1:8–16; JS, Journal, 14–19 Nov. and 18 Dec. 1833.)  


We were thronged a part of the time with company, so that our labor, in this thing, was hindered; but we obtained many precious things, and our souls were blessed. O Lord, may thy Holy Spirit be with thy servants forever. Amen.
September 23.th 22nd This day Joseph Smith, Jr. was at home writing blessings for my most beloved Brotheren I, have been hindered by a multitude of visitors but the Lord has blessed our Souls this day. May God grant to continue his mercies unto my house, this night, For Christ sake. This day my Soul has desired the salvation of Brother Ezra, Thayer

14 Oct. 1791–6 Sept. 1862. Farmer, gardener, builder. Born in New York. Married Elizabeth Frank. Lived at Bloomfield, Ontario Co., New York, 1820. Lived at Farmington, Ontario Co., 1830. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt and confirmed by JS, fall...

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. Also Brother Noah, Packard

7 May 1796–17 Feb. 1860. Farmer, surveyor, miner. Born at Plainfield, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Noah Packard and Molly Hamblin. Moved to Parkman, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1817. Married Sophia Bundy, 29 June 1820, at Parkman. Baptized into LDS church by...

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. Came to my house and let the Chappel Committee3

In June 1833, Hyrum Smith, Reynolds Cahoon, and Jared Carter were appointed as a committee to direct the construction of the House of the Lord in Kirtland. (Minute Book 1, 6 June 1833.)  


have one thousand dollers, by loan, for the building the house of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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; Oh may God bless him with an hundred fold! even of the things of Earth, for this ritious righteous act. My heart is full of desire to day, to be blessed of the God, of Abraham; with prosperity, untill I will be able to pay all my depts; for it is the delight of my soul to be honest. Oh Lord that thou knowes right well! help me and I will give to the poor.

23 September 1835 • Wednesday

September 23d 1835 This day Brothers William

26 June 1812–29 Mar. 1877. Farmer. Born at Groton, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of John Tippets and Abigail Pierce (Pearce). Baptized into LDS church, by 1834. Lived at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1834–1835. Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to...

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, John

5 Sept. 1810–14 Feb. 1890. Mail carrier, farmer. Born at Wilton, Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of John Tippets and Abigail Pierce. Lived at Lewis, Essex Co., New York, 1813–1834. Baptized into LDS church by Elijah Collins, July 1832. Married first Abigail...

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, and Joseph Tibbets Tippets

4 June 1814–12 Oct. 1868. Locksmith, cabinetmaker, farmer. Born at Lewis, Essex Co., New York. Son of Joseph Tippets and Abigail Lewis. Baptized into LDS church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1834. Moved to Missouri, 1835. Married first Rosalia Elvira...

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Started for Mosoura Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
the place designated for Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
or the Saints gathering

As directed by early revelations, church members “gathered” in communities. A revelation dated September 1830, for instance, instructed elders “to bring to pass the gathering of mine elect” who would “be gathered in unto one place, upon the face of this land...

View Glossary
they Came to bid us farewell4

On 28 November 1834, the Kirtland high council met to consider a letter sent by church members in Essex County, New York, and presented by John and Joseph Tippets. The letter listed money and property totaling $848.40 collected to purchase land in Missouri. The two men were advised to remain in Kirtland during the winter and lend part of their money to the church there. At a high council meeting on 24 August 1835, the Tippetses were counseled to resume their journey to Missouri in the fall. This entry marks their departure. (Minute Book 1, 28 Nov. 1834 and 24 Aug. 1835.)  


the Brotheren Came in to pray with them and Brother David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

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acted as spokesman he prayed in the spirit a glorious time succeded his prayr Joy filled our hearts and we [p. 1]
[Blank flyleaf followed by lined leaf with scriptural references regarding repentance on the recto]

Warren Parrish handwriting ends; Oliver Cowdery begins.  


Sketch Book for the use of
Joseph Smith, jr.1

Oliver Cowdery also used “Sketch Book” as a title for his own journal, which he began on 1 January 1836.  


22 September 1835 • Tuesday

September 22, 1835. This day Joseph Smith, jr.  labored with Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
, in obtaining and  writing blessings.2

On this date, 22 September, JS dictated blessings for David Whitmer, John Whitmer, John Corrill, and William W. Phelps. Cowdery copied these blessings on 2 and 3 October 1835 into what became the first book of patriarchal blessings. On the evening of 22 September, Cowdery wrote a prophetic blessing for JS, which he recorded in the same book on 3 October. Additional blessings given in November and December 1833 by JS for Frederick G. Williams, Sidney Rigdon, Cowdery, and JS’s parents and siblings were recorded by Cowdery in the book in late September and on 1 and 2 October. (Patriarchal Blessings, 1:8–16; JS, Journal, 14–19 Nov. and 18 Dec. 1833.)  


We were thronged a part of the  time with company, so that our labor, in this thing,  was hindered; but we obtained many precious things, and  our souls were blessed. O Lord, may thy Holy Spirit be with  thy servants forever. Amen.
September 23.th [22nd] This day Joseph Smith, Jr. was at home  writing blessings for my most beloved Brotheren <I>, have  been hindered by a multitude of visitors but the Lord  has blessed our Souls this day. May God grant <to> con tinue his mercies unto my house, this <night,> day For Chr ist sake. This day my Soul has desired the salvati on of Brother Ezra, Thay[e]r

14 Oct. 1791–6 Sept. 1862. Farmer, gardener, builder. Born in New York. Married Elizabeth Frank. Lived at Bloomfield, Ontario Co., New York, 1820. Lived at Farmington, Ontario Co., 1830. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt and confirmed by JS, fall...

View Full Bio
. Also Brother Noah,  Packard

7 May 1796–17 Feb. 1860. Farmer, surveyor, miner. Born at Plainfield, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Noah Packard and Molly Hamblin. Moved to Parkman, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1817. Married Sophia Bundy, 29 June 1820, at Parkman. Baptized into LDS church by...

View Full Bio
. Came to my house and let the Chap pel Committee3

In June 1833, Hyrum Smith, Reynolds Cahoon, and Jared Carter were appointed as a committee to direct the construction of the House of the Lord in Kirtland. (Minute Book 1, 6 June 1833.)  


have one thousand dollers, by loan,  for the building the house of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
; Oh may  God bless him with an hundred fold! even of the  <things of> Earth, for this ritious [righteous] act. My heart is full of  desire to day, to <be> blessed of the God, of Abraham;  with prosperity, untill I will be able to pay all  my depts; for it is my <the> delight of my soul to <be> honest.  Oh Lord that thou knowes right well! help me  and I will give to the poor.

23 September 1835 • Wednesday

September 23d 1835 This day Brother, <Brothers> William

26 June 1812–29 Mar. 1877. Farmer. Born at Groton, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Son of John Tippets and Abigail Pierce (Pearce). Baptized into LDS church, by 1834. Lived at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1834–1835. Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to...

View Full Bio
,  Tibbets John

5 Sept. 1810–14 Feb. 1890. Mail carrier, farmer. Born at Wilton, Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of John Tippets and Abigail Pierce. Lived at Lewis, Essex Co., New York, 1813–1834. Baptized into LDS church by Elijah Collins, July 1832. Married first Abigail...

View Full Bio
, and Joseph Tibbets [Tippets]

4 June 1814–12 Oct. 1868. Locksmith, cabinetmaker, farmer. Born at Lewis, Essex Co., New York. Son of Joseph Tippets and Abigail Lewis. Baptized into LDS church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1834. Moved to Missouri, 1835. Married first Rosalia Elvira...

View Full Bio
Started for  Mosoura [Missouri]

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
the place designated for Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
or the  Saints gathering

As directed by early revelations, church members “gathered” in communities. A revelation dated September 1830, for instance, instructed elders “to bring to pass the gathering of mine elect” who would “be gathered in unto one place, upon the face of this land...

View Glossary
they Came to bid us farewell4

On 28 November 1834, the Kirtland high council met to consider a letter sent by church members in Essex County, New York, and presented by John and Joseph Tippets. The letter listed money and property totaling $848.40 collected to purchase land in Missouri. The two men were advised to remain in Kirtland during the winter and lend part of their money to the church there. At a high council meeting on 24 August 1835, the Tippetses were counseled to resume their journey to Missouri in the fall. This entry marks their departure. (Minute Book 1, 28 Nov. 1834 and 24 Aug. 1835.)  


 the Brotheren Came in to pray with them and  Brother David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

View Full Bio
acted as spokesman  he prayed in the spirit a glorious time suc ceded his prayr Joy filled our hearts and we [p. 1]
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JS, “Sketch Book for the use of Joseph Smith, jr.,” Journal, Sept. 1835–Apr. 1836; handwriting of Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, an unidentified scribe, Sylvester Smith

25 Mar. 1806–22 Feb. 1880. Farmer, carpenter, lawyer, realtor. Born at Tyringham, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Chileab Smith and Nancy Marshall. Moved to Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, ca. 1815. Married Elizabeth Frank, 27 Dec. 1827, likely in Chautauque...

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, Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, Warren Cowdery

17 Oct. 1788–23 Feb. 1851. Physician, druggist, farmer, editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Married Patience Simonds, 22 Sept. 1814, in Pawlet, Rutland Co. Moved to Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., New York, 1816...

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, JS, and Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
; 195 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
The text block consists of 114 leaves—including single flyleaves and pastedowns in the front and back—measuring 12¼ x 8 inches (31 x 20 cm). The 110 interior leaves are ledger paper with thirty-four lines in faint—and now faded—black ink that has turned brown. There are nine gatherings of various sizes—each about a dozen leaves per gathering. The text block is sewn all along over cloth tapes. The front and back covers of the journal are pasteboard. The ledger has a tight-back case binding with a brown calfskin quarter-leather binding. The outside covers are adorned in shell marbled paper, with dark green body and veins of light green. The bound volume measures 12⅜ x 8¼ inches (31 x 21 cm) and is 13/16 inches (2 cm) thick. One cover of the book is labeled “Repentence.” in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains eight lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to Repentince”. The spine has “No 8” inscribed upside up when the book is standing upright for this side. When the volume is turned upside down and flipped front to back, the other cover is titled “Sabbath Day” with “No 9” written beneath in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains two lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to the Sabbath day”. Thus the book was used to simultaneously house two volumes of topical notes on biblical passages. This book was apparently part of a larger series that included at least two other extant volumes—one bearing “Faith” and “10” on the cover, and the other bearing “Second Comeing of Christ” and “No 3” on one cover and “Gift of the Holy Ghost” on the other cover.1

“Grammar & Aphabet of the Egyptian Language,” Kirtland Egyptian Papers, ca. 1835–1836, CHL; Kirtland Elders Quorum, “Record”.  


In late 1835, JS and scribes began using the book to record his journal for 1835–1836, which begins on the recto of the second leaf of ledger paper. Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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added the title “Sketch Book” to the cover, beneath “Repentence.”.
The entire journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown. Pages 25, 51, 77, 103, 129, and 154 bear the marks of adhesive wafers that were probably used to attach manuscripts until they were copied into the journal. The journal was used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, in 1843 as a major source in composing JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. At this time, redactions were made in ink and in graphite pencil, and use marks were made in graphite. Also, apparently in Nauvoo, the cover of the journal side of the book was marked with a “D” and then with a larger, stylized “D”. At some point a white paper spine label was added with “1835–6 <Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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> JOURNAL” hand printed or stenciled in black ink that later turned brown. The insertion “Kirtland” is written in graphite. Also, in the “Repentence” side of the volume, the rectos of the third through eighth leaves of ledger paper are numbered on the upper right-hand corners as 195, 197, 199, 201, 203, and 205—all written in graphite and apparently redactions. Except with regard to the title “Sketch Book”, none of the authors of the inscriptions mentioned previously have been identified. This volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.2

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [1], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


Facts