27468

Journal, March–September 1838

aught and should have a weekly News paper published for their information upon the news of the day. Prest. Smith said the time had come when it was necessary that we should have somthing of this nature to unite the people and aid in giving us the news of the day &c.
Whereupon it was unanymously agreed that Prest. Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
should Edit the same178

The church earlier published such a paper, the Northern Times, in Kirtland, Ohio, and later published another, The Wasp, in Nauvoo, Illinois. Events precluded publication of the prospective Missouri weekly. (Crawley, Descriptive Bibliography, 51–53, 192–193.)  


2nd That a petition be drawn up to remove the County seat to this place
Some remarks were made by Prest. Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
upon the subject, showing the great necess3rd.ity of so doing. 3rd. And that it is the duty of the bretheren to come into Cities to build and live and Carry on their farms out, of the City
Prest. Smith spoke upon the same subject of mooving into Cities to live, according to the order of God, he spoke quite lengthy and then Prest. Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
spoke and endeavoured to impress it upon the minds of the Saints,180

In 1833, JS sent a plat for the city of Zion to the Latter-day Saints in Jackson County, Missouri, with an explanation of his conception of an ideal city. The platted city, laid out in square blocks, was intended and reserved for public buildings and private residences, whereas farmlands were located outside the plat. The city plan was a model for future Mormon settlements. (Plat of City of Zion, 1833, CHL.)  


7–9 August 1838 • Tuesday–Thursday

Tuesday the 7th This morning an alarm come

6 Aug. 1838

Fighting broke out at Gallatin, Daviess County, Missouri, during attempt to prevent Latter-day Saints from voting in election; injuries and rumor of deaths resulted.

from Galliton Gallatin

Founded and laid out, 1837. Unofficial county seat, beginning 1837. Officially named county seat, 1841. Several Latter-day Saints attempted to vote at Gallatin, 6 Aug. 1838, but were attacked by local residents. After Mormon-Missouri conflict erupted, Saints...

More Info
the County seat of Daviess County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
. that during the Election on yesterday at that place some two or three of our bretheren were killed in consequence of the Malignity of the Missourians,181

Despite serious injuries, no Mormons are known to have been killed. Such exaggerated rumor and fears on both sides intensified an already violent and dangerous confrontation.  


it was reported that the citizens of Daviess County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
who were opposed to our religion, did endeavor to prohibit the bretheren from voting

6 Aug. 1838

Fighting broke out at Gallatin, Daviess County, Missouri, during attempt to prevent Latter-day Saints from voting in election; injuries and rumor of deaths resulted.

at the election in that place, and that, the men who were killed were left upon the ground and not suffered to be intered, and that the majority of that county were determined to drive the [p. 65]
aught and should have a weekly News paper pu blished for their information upon the news of the  day. Prest. Smith said the time had come  when it was necessary that we should have som thing of this nature to unite the people and aid  in giving us the news of the day &c.
Whereupon it was unanymously agreed that  Prest. S[idney] Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
should Edit the same178

The church earlier published such a paper, the Northern Times, in Kirtland, Ohio, and later published another, The Wasp, in Nauvoo, Illinois. Events precluded publication of the prospective Missouri weekly. (Crawley, Descriptive Bibliography, 51–53, 192–193.)  


<2nd> That a petition be drawn up to remove the  County seat to this place
Some remarks were made by Prest. Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
 upon the subject, showing the great necess <3rd.>ity179

TEXT: “necess[end of line]<3rd.>ity”. George W. Robinson initially misplaced the insertion “3rd.” in the left margin where the word “necessity” ran across the line break.  


of so doing. <3rd.> And that it is the duty of the  bretheren to come into Cities to build and live  and Carry on their farms out, of the City
Prest. Smith spoke upon the same subject  of mooving into Cities to live, according to  the order of God, he spoke quite lengthy  and then Prest. H[yrum] Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
spoke and endea voured to impress it upon the same minds  of the Saints,180

In 1833, JS sent a plat for the city of Zion to the Latter-day Saints in Jackson County, Missouri, with an explanation of his conception of an ideal city. The platted city, laid out in square blocks, was intended and reserved for public buildings and private residences, whereas farmlands were located outside the plat. The city plan was a model for future Mormon settlements. (Plat of City of Zion, 1833, CHL.)  


7–9 August 1838 • Tuesday–Thursday

Tuesday the 7th This morning an alarm come

6 Aug. 1838

Fighting broke out at Gallatin, Daviess County, Missouri, during attempt to prevent Latter-day Saints from voting in election; injuries and rumor of deaths resulted.

from  Galliton [Gallatin]

Founded and laid out, 1837. Unofficial county seat, beginning 1837. Officially named county seat, 1841. Several Latter-day Saints attempted to vote at Gallatin, 6 Aug. 1838, but were attacked by local residents. After Mormon-Missouri conflict erupted, Saints...

More Info
the County seat of Davi[es]s County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
. that  during the Election on yesterday at that place  some two or three of our bretheren were killed  in consequence of the Malignity of the Missou rians,181

Despite serious injuries, no Mormons are known to have been killed. Such exaggerated rumor and fears on both sides intensified an already violent and dangerous confrontation.  


it was reported that the citizens of Daviess  County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
who were opposed to our religion, did  endeavor to prohibit the bretheren from voting

6 Aug. 1838

Fighting broke out at Gallatin, Daviess County, Missouri, during attempt to prevent Latter-day Saints from voting in election; injuries and rumor of deaths resulted.

 at the election in that place, and that, the men  who were killed were left upon the ground and  not suffered to be intered, and that the majority  of that county were determined to drive the [p. 65]
PreviousNext
JS, “The Scriptory Book—of Joseph Smith Jr.—President of The Church of Jesus Christ, of Latterday Saints In all the World,” Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838; handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

View Full Bio
and James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

View Full Bio
; sixty-nine pages; in “General,” Record Book, 1838, verso of Patriarchal Blessings, vol. 5, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
JS’s “Scriptory Book” is recorded on pages 15 to 83 of a large record book entitled “General” that also includes a list of church members in Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
, Missouri (pages 2–14), a copy of JS’s 16 December 1838 letter from the jail in Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

More Info
, Missouri (pages 101–108), and an aborted record partially entitled “Recor” in unidentified handwriting (page 110). The book, which measures 13 x 8¼ x 1¾ inches (33 x 21 x 4 cm), has 182 leaves of ledger paper sized 12½ x 7¾ inches (32 x 20 cm) with thirty-seven lines in blue ink per page. There are eighteen gatherings of various sizes, each of about a dozen leaves. The text block is sewn all along over three vellum tapes. The heavy pink endpapers each consist of a pastedown and two flyleaves pasted together. The text block edges are stained green. The volume has a hardbound ledger-style binding with a hollow-back spine and glued-on blue-striped cloth headbands. It is bound in brown split-calfskin leather with blind-tooled decoration around the outside border and along the turned-in edges of the leather on the inside covers. At some point the letter “G” was hand printed in ink on the front cover. The original leather cover over the spine—which appears to have been intentionally removed—may have borne a title or filing notation.
The journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown and is almost entirely in the handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

View Full Bio
. James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

View Full Bio
’s handwriting appears in a copy of the 23 July 1837 revelation for Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
(D&C 112) on pages 72–74. Running heads added by Robinson throughout the journal indicate the months of the entries on the page. The volume was later used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, Illinois, as a source for JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. During the preparation of the history, redactions and use marks were made in graphite pencil. Redactions in graphite and ink may have been made at other times as well. In 1845, the book was turned over so that the back cover became the front and the last page became the first. This side of the book was used to record patriarchal blessings. The original spine may have been removed at this time. The spine is now labeled with a number “5”, designating its volume number in a series of books of patriarchal blessings.
The volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [2]; Historian’s Office, “Index of Records and Journals,” [12], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; JS, Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838, microfilm, JS Collection, CHL.  


At some point, the leaf containing pages 54 and 55 was torn from the journal. This removed leaf—which is transcribed herein and contains, among other writings, the earliest extant text of an 8 July 1838 revelation for the Quorum of the Twelve (D&C 118)—was for a time kept in Revelation Book 2.2

Best, “Register of the Revelations Collection,” 19.  


It is now part of the Revelations Collection at the Church History Library.

Facts