27468

Journal, March–September 1838

shall be damned. For unto you (the twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

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) and those (the first presidency

An organized body of leaders over priesthood quorums and other ecclesiastical organizations. A November 1831 revelation first described the office of president over the high priesthood and the church as a whole. By 1832, JS and two counselors constituted ...

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) who are appointed with you to be your counsellors and your leaders, is the power of this priesthood

Power or authority of God. The priesthood was conferred through the laying on of hands upon adult male members of the church in good standing; no specialized training was required. Priesthood officers held responsibility for administering the sacrament of...

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given for the last days and for the last time, in the which is the dispensation

A period of God’s work on earth, such as the “dispensation of the gospel of Abraham.” The biblical phrase “dispensation of the fulness of times” appears often in the writing of early Latter-day Saints; they typically used it to describe the final dispensation...

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of the fulness of times: which power you hold in connection with all those who have received a dispensation at any time from the beginning of the creation, for verily I say unto you the keys

Authority or knowledge of God given to humankind. In the earliest records, the term keys primarily referred to JS’s authority to unlock the “mysteries of the kingdom.” Early revelations declared that both JS and Oliver Cowdery held the keys to bring forth...

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of the dispensation which ye have received have came down from the fathers; and last of all being sent down from heaven unto you. Verily I say unto you, Behold how great is your calling.
Cleanse your hearts and your garments, lest the blood of this generation be required at your hands. Be faithful untill I come for I come quickly and my reward is with me to recompense every man according as his work shall be! I am Alpha and Omega. Amen.
The above revelation was given in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, and was not here in time to insert in its proper sequence209

Marsh reportedly recorded this revelation into his own book as JS dictated it in July 1837. It is possible that JS had not retained a copy and that therefore his clerk could not copy the revelation in its “proper sequence” when copying other Kirtland documents into the beginning of the present journal. Vilate Murray Kimball, wife of apostle Heber C. Kimball, had made a transcript of the revelation from Marsh’s copy and sent it to her husband in England. Kimball had recently returned from England and may have provided his copy as the basis for this version, as the two closely resemble each other with the exception of distinctive punctuation and occasional wording variants. (JS, Journal, 29 July 1838; Vilate Murray Kimball, Kirtland Mills, OH, to Heber C. Kimball, Preston, England, 12 Sept. 1837, Heber C. Kimball, Collection, CHL.)  


G. W. R. George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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Recorder.

31 August 1838 • Friday

Friday the 31st. Prest. Joseph spent some considerable time this day in conversation with br. John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, in consequence of some expressions made by him in pressence of some considerable number of bretheren present, who might perhaps be weak in the faith, as they had not been long in the place, therefore consequently were made verry unwisely,210

Reed Peck later recounted that JS reproved Corrill for expressing doubt regarding a revelation directing all Latter-day Saints to join the recently organized cooperatives. (Reed Peck, Quincy, IL, to “Dear Friends,” 18 Sept. 1839, pp. 53–54, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA; see also JS, Journal, 20–21 Aug. 1838.)  


Br. Corril

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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s. conduct for some time past, has been verry unbecoming indeed especially a man in whoom so much confidence has been placed, He has been difficulted to keep track and walk step, by step, with the great wheal which is propelled by the arm of the great Jehovah, he says he will not yeald his Judgement, to any thing proposed by the Church, or any individuals of the Church, or even the voice of the great (I am,) given through the appointed organ, as revelation, but will always act upon his Judgement [p. 74]
shall be damned. For unto you (the twelve

Members of a governing body in the church, with special administrative and proselytizing responsibilities. A June 1829 revelation commanded Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer to call twelve disciples, similar to the twelve apostles in the New Testament and ...

View Glossary
) and those (the first  presidency

An organized body of leaders over priesthood quorums and other ecclesiastical organizations. A November 1831 revelation first described the office of president over the high priesthood and the church as a whole. By 1832, JS and two counselors constituted ...

View Glossary
) who are appointed with you to be your counsellors and  your leaders, is the power of this priesthood

Power or authority of God. The priesthood was conferred through the laying on of hands upon adult male members of the church in good standing; no specialized training was required. Priesthood officers held responsibility for administering the sacrament of...

View Glossary
given for the last days  and for the last time, in the which is the dispensation

A period of God’s work on earth, such as the “dispensation of the gospel of Abraham.” The biblical phrase “dispensation of the fulness of times” appears often in the writing of early Latter-day Saints; they typically used it to describe the final dispensation...

View Glossary
of the fulness  of times: which power you hold in connection with all those who  have received a dispensation at any time from the beginning of the  creation, for verily I say unto you the keys

Authority or knowledge of God given to humankind. In the earliest records, the term keys primarily referred to JS’s authority to unlock the “mysteries of the kingdom.” Early revelations declared that both JS and Oliver Cowdery held the keys to bring forth...

View Glossary
of the dispensation which  ye have received have came down from the fathers; and last of all  being sent down from heaven unto you. Verily I say unto you, Behold  how great is your calling.
Cleanse your hearts and your  garments, lest the blood of this generation be required at your hands.  Be faithful untill I come for I come quickly and my reward is  with me to recompense every man according as his work shall be!  I am Alpha and Omega. Amen.

James Mulholland handwriting ends; George W. Robinson begins.  


The above revelation was given in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, and was  not here in time to insert in its proper sequence209

Marsh reportedly recorded this revelation into his own book as JS dictated it in July 1837. It is possible that JS had not retained a copy and that therefore his clerk could not copy the revelation in its “proper sequence” when copying other Kirtland documents into the beginning of the present journal. Vilate Murray Kimball, wife of apostle Heber C. Kimball, had made a transcript of the revelation from Marsh’s copy and sent it to her husband in England. Kimball had recently returned from England and may have provided his copy as the basis for this version, as the two closely resemble each other with the exception of distinctive punctuation and occasional wording variants. (JS, Journal, 29 July 1838; Vilate Murray Kimball, Kirtland Mills, OH, to Heber C. Kimball, Preston, England, 12 Sept. 1837, Heber C. Kimball, Collection, CHL.)  


G. W. R. [George W. Robinson]

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

View Full Bio
Recorder.

31 August 1838 • Friday

Friday the 31st. Prest. Joseph spent some considera ble time this day in conversation with br. John  Corril[l]

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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, in consequence of some expressions made  by him in pressence of some considerable number  of bretheren present, who might perhaps be  weak in the faith, as they had not been long  in the place, therefore consequently were made  verry unwisely,210

Reed Peck later recounted that JS reproved Corrill for expressing doubt regarding a revelation directing all Latter-day Saints to join the recently organized cooperatives. (Reed Peck, Quincy, IL, to “Dear Friends,” 18 Sept. 1839, pp. 53–54, Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA; see also JS, Journal, 20–21 Aug. 1838.)  


Br. Corril

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
s. conduct for some  time past, has been verry unbecoming indeed  especially a man in whoom so much confid ence has been placed, He has been difficulted to keep  track and walk step, by step, with the great wheal which  is propelled by the arm of the great Jehovah, he says he  will not yeald his Judgement, to any thing proposed by  the Church, or any individuals of the Church, or even the  voice of the great (I am,) given through the appointed  organ, as revelation, but will always act upon his Judgement [p. 74]
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JS, “The Scriptory Book—of Joseph Smith Jr.—President of The Church of Jesus Christ, of Latterday Saints In all the World,” Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838; handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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and James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; sixty-nine pages; in “General,” Record Book, 1838, verso of Patriarchal Blessings, vol. 5, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
JS’s “Scriptory Book” is recorded on pages 15 to 83 of a large record book entitled “General” that also includes a list of church members in Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, Missouri (pages 2–14), a copy of JS’s 16 December 1838 letter from the jail in Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Missouri (pages 101–108), and an aborted record partially entitled “Recor” in unidentified handwriting (page 110). The book, which measures 13 x 8¼ x 1¾ inches (33 x 21 x 4 cm), has 182 leaves of ledger paper sized 12½ x 7¾ inches (32 x 20 cm) with thirty-seven lines in blue ink per page. There are eighteen gatherings of various sizes, each of about a dozen leaves. The text block is sewn all along over three vellum tapes. The heavy pink endpapers each consist of a pastedown and two flyleaves pasted together. The text block edges are stained green. The volume has a hardbound ledger-style binding with a hollow-back spine and glued-on blue-striped cloth headbands. It is bound in brown split-calfskin leather with blind-tooled decoration around the outside border and along the turned-in edges of the leather on the inside covers. At some point the letter “G” was hand printed in ink on the front cover. The original leather cover over the spine—which appears to have been intentionally removed—may have borne a title or filing notation.
The journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown and is almost entirely in the handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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. James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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’s handwriting appears in a copy of the 23 July 1837 revelation for Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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(D&C 112) on pages 72–74. Running heads added by Robinson throughout the journal indicate the months of the entries on the page. The volume was later used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, as a source for JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. During the preparation of the history, redactions and use marks were made in graphite pencil. Redactions in graphite and ink may have been made at other times as well. In 1845, the book was turned over so that the back cover became the front and the last page became the first. This side of the book was used to record patriarchal blessings. The original spine may have been removed at this time. The spine is now labeled with a number “5”, designating its volume number in a series of books of patriarchal blessings.
The volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [2]; Historian’s Office, “Index of Records and Journals,” [12], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; JS, Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838, microfilm, JS Collection, CHL.  


At some point, the leaf containing pages 54 and 55 was torn from the journal. This removed leaf—which is transcribed herein and contains, among other writings, the earliest extant text of an 8 July 1838 revelation for the Quorum of the Twelve (D&C 118)—was for a time kept in Revelation Book 2.2

Best, “Register of the Revelations Collection,” 19.  


It is now part of the Revelations Collection at the Church History Library.

Facts