27468

Journal, March–September 1838

let him believe in whatever religion he may, he says he will always say what he pleases, for he says he is a republican, and as such he will do, say, act, and believe, what he pleases,211

Corrill’s statement embodied a central point of dispute for recent dissenters: that they would not submit to “popery and religious tyrany.” The early American ideology of republicanism focused on the concepts of a commonwealth of a virtuous and independent citizenry of white males with equal rights and opportunities under the law. It was conventionally contrasted with tyrannies of political and religious absolutism. ([Warren Cowdery], Editorial, LDS Messenger and Advocate, July 1837, 3:538; Watson, Liberty and Power, chap. 2.)  


Let the reader mark such republicanism as this, That a man should oppose his own Judgement to the Judgement of God, and at the same time profess to believe in the same God, when that God has said, “the wisdom of God, is foolishness with men, and the wisdom or Judgment of men is foolishness with God.212

See 1 Corinthians 3:19.  


Prest. Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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also made some observations to br. Corril

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
, which he afterwards acknowleged were correct, and that he understood things different after the intervew, from what he did before,

Editorial Note
As September began, rumors of Mormon violence, fanned by Adam Black

11 Sept. 1801–14 July 1890. Farmer, sheriff, justice of the peace, judge. Born at Henderson Co., Kentucky. Son of William Black and Jane Wilson. Moved near Booneville, Copper Co., Missouri Territory, and then to Ray Co., Missouri Territory, 1819. Elected ...

View Full Bio
, William Peniston

Ca. 1811–10 Nov. 1850. Sheriff, military colonel, clerk, hotelier. Born at Jessamine Co., Kentucky. Son of Robert Peniston and Nancy Nuttle. Moved to Ray Co., Missouri, ca. 1831. A founder of Millport, in what became Daviess Co., Missouri, where family built...

View Full Bio
, and others, put northwestern Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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on a war footing. Sheriff William Morgan had intended to arrest JS on 16 August but was ultimately dissuaded because of a jurisdictional issue.213

JS, Journal, 16–18 Aug. 1838.  


Within his own jurisdiction of Daviess County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
, Morgan apparently intended to arrest Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
as well but was intimidated by Wight’s defiant posture. Missouri newspapers reported that the sheriff went to Wight’s home with the intent of arresting him but found the home surrounded by armed Latter-day Saints. Wight was reported to have threatened “that he would not be taken alive—that the law had never protected him, and he owed them no obedience.”214

“Mormon War,” Missouri Republican, 8 Sept. 1838, [1], “for the country” edition; see also Austin A. King, Ray Co., MO, to William Morgan, Daviess Co., MO, 4 Sept. 1838, William Morgan, Papers, CHL.  


On 29 August 1838, Peniston and other members of a Daviess County “Committee of Vigilance” wrote that JS and Wight “say they will not be taken, nor submit to the law of the land” and that “two or three” attempts had been made to arrest them.215

“Mormons Once More,” Hannibal Commercial Advertiser, 25 Sept. 1838, [1].  


By 2 September 1838, Peniston, Black, and other Daviess County residents had solicited aid from Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

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, Livingston

Organized 1837. Population in 1840 about 4,300. Hawn’s Mill Massacre planned by mob in eastern part of county.

More Info
, Clay

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
, Lafayette

Located south of Missouri River in west-central part of state. Settled by 1816. Name changed from Lillard Co. to Lafayette Co., 1825, to honor the Marquis de Lafayette. County seat, Lexington. Jackson Co. created from western part of Lafayette Co., 1825. ...

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, Jackson

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, Carroll, Howard, Chariton

Established 16 Nov. 1820. Village of Chariton named county seat, 1820. Keytesville named county seat, 1833. Population in 1830 about 1,800. Population in 1836 about 3,500. In Aug. 1831, while en route from Independence to Kirtland, JS met ten other elders...

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, and possibly other Missouri counties.216

Hiram Cumstock, Livingston Co., MO, to “the Citizens of Carroll County,” 12 Aug. 1838, Missouri Argus, 6 Sept. 1838, [1]; “The Mormon Difficulties,” Niles’ National Register, 13 Oct. 1838, 103; “The Mormons,” Missouri Argus, 13 Sept. 1838, [3].  


On 4 September, in consultation with General David Atchison

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

View Full Bio
, JS and Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
agreed to be tried on charges stemming from Adam Black

11 Sept. 1801–14 July 1890. Farmer, sheriff, justice of the peace, judge. Born at Henderson Co., Kentucky. Son of William Black and Jane Wilson. Moved near Booneville, Copper Co., Missouri Territory, and then to Ray Co., Missouri Territory, 1819. Elected ...

View Full Bio
’s affidavit, with Atchison and Alexander Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
to serve as their legal counsel. They requested that circuit court judge Austin A. King

21 Sept. 1802–22 Apr. 1870. Attorney, judge, politician, farmer. Born at Sullivan Co., Tennessee. Son of Walter King and Nancy Sevier. Married first Nancy Harris Roberts, 13 May 1828, at Jackson, Madison Co., Tennessee. In 1830, moved to Missouri, where he...

View Full Bio
of Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

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, Clay County, conduct a preliminary hearing on the matter in Daviess County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
. King agreed to do so “for the sake of giving quiet to the country” and instructed Sheriff William Morgan of Daviess County to “go to Mr. Wight who will submit to your process . . . when you go to execute your process on Wight you need take no one with you.”217

A. A. King to W. Morgan, 4 Sept. 1838.  


The hearing took place on 7 September, but it failed to bring peace to Daviess County as outsiders continued to mobilize—now not merely to bring JS and Wight to justice but to drive the Mormons from the county.

1 September 1838 • Saturday

Saturday 1st. Sept. 1838 — — — — — — — The first Presidency

The highest presiding body of the church. An 11 November 1831 revelation stated that the president of the high priesthood was to preside over the church. JS was ordained as president of the high priesthood on 25 January 1832. In March 1832, JS appointed two...

View Glossary
Judge Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

View Full Bio
(as surveyor,) Started this morning for the halfway house

Residence owned by Latter-day Saint Waldo Littlefield. Located on Dog Creek about halfway between Far West and Adam-ondi-Ahman. Described as one-room log building, about twenty feet square.

More Info
218

The Littlefield “halfway house” was located in southern Daviess County approximately halfway between Far West and Adam-ondi-Ahman—a strategic location for Mormon settlement. George W. Robinson and others may have believed at this time that the halfway house was located just inside Mormon-controlled Caldwell County. (See JS, Journal, 4 Sept. 1838; compare 6 Sept. 1838.)  


(as it is called) Kept by br. Waldo Littlefield

24 May 1797–29 Jan. 1879. Farmer. Born at Petersburg, Rensselaer Co., New York. Son of Josiah Littlefield and Eunice Hunt. Moved to Oneida Co., New York, ca. 1809. Married Mercy Higgins, 18 May 1817. Moved to Verona, Oneida Co., by 1820. Moved to Oakland ...

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, some 14 or 15 miles from Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
directly north, For the purpose of appointing a city of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
, for the gathering

As directed by early revelations, church members “gathered” in communities. A revelation dated September 1830, for instance, instructed elders “to bring to pass the gathering of mine elect” who would “be gathered in unto one place, upon the face of this land...

View Glossary
of the saints in that place, for safety and from the storm which will soon come upon this genneration,219

See Revelation, 26 Apr. 1838, in JS, Journal, 26 Apr. 1838 [D&C 115:6].  


and that the bretheren may be together in the hour of the coming of the son of man and that they may receive instructions to prepare them for that great day which will come upon this generation as a thief in the knight,220

See Revelation, ca. 7 Mar. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 15:3, 1835 ed. [D&C 45:19].  


There is great exitement at present among the misourians seeking if possible an accasion against us they are continually chafing us, and provoking us to anger if possible, one sene of threatning after an=other.221

Fueled by the accusations of Black and Peniston, rumors of Mormon lawlessness and mobilization helped to rally anti-Mormon vigilantes in neighboring counties. Hyrum Smith later testified that the vigilantes who were gathering in Daviess County began stealing Mormon livestock, threatening physical violence, and even taking prisoners. (Hiram Cumstock, Livingston Co., MO, to “the Citizens of Carroll County,” 12 Aug. 1838, Missouri Argus, 6 Sept. 1838, [1]; Hyrum Smith, Testimony, 1 July 1843, Nauvoo Municipal Court Docket Book, 61–63; George A. Smith, Autobiography, 108; Swartzell, Mormonism Exposed, 31.)  


but we do not fear them [p. 75]
let him believe in whatever religion he may, he says  he will always say what he pleases, for he says  he is a republican, and as such he will do, say,  act, and believe, what he pleases,211

Corrill’s statement embodied a central point of dispute for recent dissenters: that they would not submit to “popery and religious tyrany.” The early American ideology of republicanism focused on the concepts of a commonwealth of a virtuous and independent citizenry of white males with equal rights and opportunities under the law. It was conventionally contrasted with tyrannies of political and religious absolutism. ([Warren Cowdery], Editorial, LDS Messenger and Advocate, July 1837, 3:538; Watson, Liberty and Power, chap. 2.)  


Let the rea der mark such republicanism as this,  That a man should oppose his own Judgement  to the Judgement of God, and at the same time  profess to believe in the same God, when that God  has said, “the wisdom of God, is foolishness with  men, and the wisdom or Judgment of men is  foolishness with God.212

See 1 Corinthians 3:19.  


Prest. [Sidney] Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
also made  some observations to br. Corril

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

View Full Bio
, which he afterw ards acknowleged were correct, and that he understood  things different after the intervew, from what he  did before,

Editorial Note
As September began, rumors of Mormon violence, fanned by Adam Black

11 Sept. 1801–14 July 1890. Farmer, sheriff, justice of the peace, judge. Born at Henderson Co., Kentucky. Son of William Black and Jane Wilson. Moved near Booneville, Copper Co., Missouri Territory, and then to Ray Co., Missouri Territory, 1819. Elected ...

View Full Bio
, William Peniston

Ca. 1811–10 Nov. 1850. Sheriff, military colonel, clerk, hotelier. Born at Jessamine Co., Kentucky. Son of Robert Peniston and Nancy Nuttle. Moved to Ray Co., Missouri, ca. 1831. A founder of Millport, in what became Daviess Co., Missouri, where family built...

View Full Bio
, and others, put northwestern Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
on a war footing. Sheriff William Morgan had intended to arrest JS on 16 August but was ultimately dissuaded because of a jurisdictional issue.213

JS, Journal, 16–18 Aug. 1838.  


Within his own jurisdiction of Daviess County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
, Morgan apparently intended to arrest Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
as well but was intimidated by Wight’s defiant posture. Missouri newspapers reported that the sheriff went to Wight’s home with the intent of arresting him but found the home surrounded by armed Latter-day Saints. Wight was reported to have threatened “that he would not be taken alive—that the law had never protected him, and he owed them no obedience.”214

“Mormon War,” Missouri Republican, 8 Sept. 1838, [1], “for the country” edition; see also Austin A. King, Ray Co., MO, to William Morgan, Daviess Co., MO, 4 Sept. 1838, William Morgan, Papers, CHL.  


On 29 August 1838, Peniston and other members of a Daviess County “Committee of Vigilance” wrote that JS and Wight “say they will not be taken, nor submit to the law of the land” and that “two or three” attempts had been made to arrest them.215

“Mormons Once More,” Hannibal Commercial Advertiser, 25 Sept. 1838, [1].  


By 2 September 1838, Peniston, Black, and other Daviess County residents had solicited aid from Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

More Info
, Livingston

Organized 1837. Population in 1840 about 4,300. Hawn’s Mill Massacre planned by mob in eastern part of county.

More Info
, Clay

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
, Lafayette

Located south of Missouri River in west-central part of state. Settled by 1816. Name changed from Lillard Co. to Lafayette Co., 1825, to honor the Marquis de Lafayette. County seat, Lexington. Jackson Co. created from western part of Lafayette Co., 1825. ...

More Info
, Jackson

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, Carroll, Howard, Chariton

Established 16 Nov. 1820. Village of Chariton named county seat, 1820. Keytesville named county seat, 1833. Population in 1830 about 1,800. Population in 1836 about 3,500. In Aug. 1831, while en route from Independence to Kirtland, JS met ten other elders...

More Info
, and possibly other Missouri counties.216

Hiram Cumstock, Livingston Co., MO, to “the Citizens of Carroll County,” 12 Aug. 1838, Missouri Argus, 6 Sept. 1838, [1]; “The Mormon Difficulties,” Niles’ National Register, 13 Oct. 1838, 103; “The Mormons,” Missouri Argus, 13 Sept. 1838, [3].  


On 4 September, in consultation with General David Atchison

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

View Full Bio
, JS and Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
agreed to be tried on charges stemming from Adam Black

11 Sept. 1801–14 July 1890. Farmer, sheriff, justice of the peace, judge. Born at Henderson Co., Kentucky. Son of William Black and Jane Wilson. Moved near Booneville, Copper Co., Missouri Territory, and then to Ray Co., Missouri Territory, 1819. Elected ...

View Full Bio
’s affidavit, with Atchison and Alexander Doniphan

9 July 1808–8 Aug. 1887. Lawyer, military general, insurance/bank executive. Born near Maysville, Mason Co., Kentucky. Son of Joseph Doniphan and Ann Smith. Father died, 1813; sent to live with older brother George, 1815, in Augusta, Bracken Co., Kentucky...

View Full Bio
to serve as their legal counsel. They requested that circuit court judge Austin A. King

21 Sept. 1802–22 Apr. 1870. Attorney, judge, politician, farmer. Born at Sullivan Co., Tennessee. Son of Walter King and Nancy Sevier. Married first Nancy Harris Roberts, 13 May 1828, at Jackson, Madison Co., Tennessee. In 1830, moved to Missouri, where he...

View Full Bio
of Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
, Clay County, conduct a preliminary hearing on the matter in Daviess County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
. King agreed to do so “for the sake of giving quiet to the country” and instructed Sheriff William Morgan of Daviess County to “go to Mr. Wight who will submit to your process . . . when you go to execute your process on Wight you need take no one with you.”217

A. A. King to W. Morgan, 4 Sept. 1838.  


The hearing took place on 7 September, but it failed to bring peace to Daviess County as outsiders continued to mobilize—now not merely to bring JS and Wight to justice but to drive the Mormons from the county.

1 September 1838 • Saturday

Saturday 1st. Sept. 1838 — — — — — — —  The first Presidency

The highest presiding body of the church. An 11 November 1831 revelation stated that the president of the high priesthood was to preside over the church. JS was ordained as president of the high priesthood on 25 January 1832. In March 1832, JS appointed two...

View Glossary
 their Scribe, & Judge [Elias] Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

View Full Bio
(as surveyor,) Started  this morning for the halfway house

Residence owned by Latter-day Saint Waldo Littlefield. Located on Dog Creek about halfway between Far West and Adam-ondi-Ahman. Described as one-room log building, about twenty feet square.

More Info
218

The Littlefield “halfway house” was located in southern Daviess County approximately halfway between Far West and Adam-ondi-Ahman—a strategic location for Mormon settlement. George W. Robinson and others may have believed at this time that the halfway house was located just inside Mormon-controlled Caldwell County. (See JS, Journal, 4 Sept. 1838; compare 6 Sept. 1838.)  


(as it is called)  Kept [by] br. [Waldo] Littlefield

24 May 1797–29 Jan. 1879. Farmer. Born at Petersburg, Rensselaer Co., New York. Son of Josiah Littlefield and Eunice Hunt. Moved to Oneida Co., New York, ca. 1809. Married Mercy Higgins, 18 May 1817. Moved to Verona, Oneida Co., by 1820. Moved to Oakland ...

View Full Bio
, some 14 or 15 miles from  Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
directly north, For the purpose of appo inting a city of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
, for the gathering

As directed by early revelations, church members “gathered” in communities. A revelation dated September 1830, for instance, instructed elders “to bring to pass the gathering of mine elect” who would “be gathered in unto one place, upon the face of this land...

View Glossary
of the  saints in that place, for safety and from the  storm which will soon come upon this genne ration,219

See Revelation, 26 Apr. 1838, in JS, Journal, 26 Apr. 1838 [D&C 115:6].  


and that the bretheren may be togeth er in the hour of the coming of the son of man  and that they may receive instruction<s> to prep are them for that great day which will come upon  this generation as a thief in the knight,220

See Revelation, ca. 7 Mar. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 15:3, 1835 ed. [D&C 45:19].  


There is  great exitement at present among the misourians  seeking if possible an accasion against us  they are continually chafing us, and provoking  us to anger if possible, one sene of threats threatning  after an=other.221

Fueled by the accusations of Black and Peniston, rumors of Mormon lawlessness and mobilization helped to rally anti-Mormon vigilantes in neighboring counties. Hyrum Smith later testified that the vigilantes who were gathering in Daviess County began stealing Mormon livestock, threatening physical violence, and even taking prisoners. (Hiram Cumstock, Livingston Co., MO, to “the Citizens of Carroll County,” 12 Aug. 1838, Missouri Argus, 6 Sept. 1838, [1]; Hyrum Smith, Testimony, 1 July 1843, Nauvoo Municipal Court Docket Book, 61–63; George A. Smith, Autobiography, 108; Swartzell, Mormonism Exposed, 31.)  


but we do not fear them [p. 75]
PreviousNext
JS, “The Scriptory Book—of Joseph Smith Jr.—President of The Church of Jesus Christ, of Latterday Saints In all the World,” Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838; handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

View Full Bio
and James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; sixty-nine pages; in “General,” Record Book, 1838, verso of Patriarchal Blessings, vol. 5, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
JS’s “Scriptory Book” is recorded on pages 15 to 83 of a large record book entitled “General” that also includes a list of church members in Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, Missouri (pages 2–14), a copy of JS’s 16 December 1838 letter from the jail in Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Missouri (pages 101–108), and an aborted record partially entitled “Recor” in unidentified handwriting (page 110). The book, which measures 13 x 8¼ x 1¾ inches (33 x 21 x 4 cm), has 182 leaves of ledger paper sized 12½ x 7¾ inches (32 x 20 cm) with thirty-seven lines in blue ink per page. There are eighteen gatherings of various sizes, each of about a dozen leaves. The text block is sewn all along over three vellum tapes. The heavy pink endpapers each consist of a pastedown and two flyleaves pasted together. The text block edges are stained green. The volume has a hardbound ledger-style binding with a hollow-back spine and glued-on blue-striped cloth headbands. It is bound in brown split-calfskin leather with blind-tooled decoration around the outside border and along the turned-in edges of the leather on the inside covers. At some point the letter “G” was hand printed in ink on the front cover. The original leather cover over the spine—which appears to have been intentionally removed—may have borne a title or filing notation.
The journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown and is almost entirely in the handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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. James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

View Full Bio
’s handwriting appears in a copy of the 23 July 1837 revelation for Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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(D&C 112) on pages 72–74. Running heads added by Robinson throughout the journal indicate the months of the entries on the page. The volume was later used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, as a source for JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. During the preparation of the history, redactions and use marks were made in graphite pencil. Redactions in graphite and ink may have been made at other times as well. In 1845, the book was turned over so that the back cover became the front and the last page became the first. This side of the book was used to record patriarchal blessings. The original spine may have been removed at this time. The spine is now labeled with a number “5”, designating its volume number in a series of books of patriarchal blessings.
The volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [2]; Historian’s Office, “Index of Records and Journals,” [12], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; JS, Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838, microfilm, JS Collection, CHL.  


At some point, the leaf containing pages 54 and 55 was torn from the journal. This removed leaf—which is transcribed herein and contains, among other writings, the earliest extant text of an 8 July 1838 revelation for the Quorum of the Twelve (D&C 118)—was for a time kept in Revelation Book 2.2

Best, “Register of the Revelations Collection,” 19.  


It is now part of the Revelations Collection at the Church History Library.

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