31764

John Whitmer, History, 1831–circa 1847

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that I have not written. After he had prophecied, he laid his hands upon Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

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to the High priesthood after the holy order of God. And the Spirit fell upon Lyman

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
, and he prophecied, concerning the coming of Christ, he said that there were some in this congregation that should live until the Savior shoud decend from heaven, with a Shout, with all the holy angels with him. He said the coming of the Savior should be, like, the Sun rising in the east, and will cover the whole earth, so will the coming of the Son of man be. Yea, he will appear in his brightness, and consume all before him. And the hills will be laid low; and valies be exalted; and the crooked be made straight; and the rough smooth. And some of my brethren shall suffer marterdom, for the sake of the religion of Jesus Christ. and seal the testimony of Jesus with their blood. He saw the hevans opened, and the Son of man sitting on the right hand of the Father. Making intercession for his brethren. the Saints. He said that God would work a work in these Last days that tongue cannot express, and the mind of is not capable to conceive. The glory of the Lord shone around.
At this conference these were ordained to the highpriesthood namely. Lyman White [Wight]

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
, Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, John Murdock

15 July 1792–23 Dec. 1871. Farmer. Born at Kortright, Delaware Co., New York. Son of John Murdock Sr. and Eleanor Riggs. Joined Lutheran Dutch Church, ca. 1817, then Presbyterian Seceder Church shortly after. Moved to Orange, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ca. 1819....

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, Reynolds Cahoon

30 Apr. 1790–29 Apr. 1861. Farmer, tanner, builder. Born at Cambridge, Washington Co., New York. Son of William Cahoon Jr. and Mehitable Hodges. Married Thirza Stiles, 11 Dec. 1810. Moved to northeastern Ohio, 1811. Located at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co.,...

View Full Bio
, Harvey Whitlock

1809–after 1880. Physician. Born in Massachusetts. Married Minerva Abbott, 21 Nov. 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 1831. Ordained an elder, by June 1831. Ordained a high priest, 4 June 1831. Served mission to Jackson Co., Missouri, with David Whitmer, 1831...

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, and Hyram [Hyrum] Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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were ordained by Joseph Smith Jr. except Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
.
The following by Lyman Whight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
by commandments. Parley P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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, Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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, Isaac Morley

11 Mar. 1786–24 June 1865. Farmer, cooper, merchant, postmaster. Born at Montague, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Thomas Morley and Editha (Edith) Marsh. Family affiliated with Presbyterian church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, before 1812. Married...

View Full Bio
, Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
, Joseph Wakefield

7 July 1792–18 Jan. 1835. Born in Dublin, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of Thomas Wakefield and Elizabeth Hardy. Married first Eunice Sawyer, 13 Dec. 1812. Moved to Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York, by 1820. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder...

View Full Bio
, Ezra Thayer

Ca. 1792–6 Sept. 1862. Farmer, gardener, builder. Born in New York. Married Elizabeth Frank. Lived at Bloomfield, Ontario Co., New York, 1820. Lived at Farmington, Ontario Co., 1830. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt and confirmed by JS, fall 1830...

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, Martin Harris

18 May 1783–10 July 1875. Farmer. Born at Easton, Albany Co., New York. Son of Nathan Harris and Rhoda Lapham. Moved with parents to area of Swift’s landing (later in Palmyra), Ontario Co., New York, 1793. Married first his first cousin Lucy Harris, 27 Mar...

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, Ezra Booth

14 Feb. 1792–before 12 Jan. 1873. Farmer, minister. Born in Newtown, Fairfield Co., Connecticut. Admitted on trial to Methodist ministry, 4 Sept. 1816, and stationed in the Ohio District in Beaver, Pike Co. Admitted into full connection and elected a deacon...

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who denied the fiath Harvy Whitlock

1809–after 1880. Physician. Born in Massachusetts. Married Minerva Abbott, 21 Nov. 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 1831. Ordained an elder, by June 1831. Ordained a high priest, 4 June 1831. Served mission to Jackson Co., Missouri, with David Whitmer, 1831...

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denied the faith, also Joseph Waekfield

7 July 1792–18 Jan. 1835. Born in Dublin, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of Thomas Wakefield and Elizabeth Hardy. Married first Eunice Sawyer, 13 Dec. 1812. Moved to Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York, by 1820. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder...

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, Joseph Smith Sen.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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Joseph Smith Jr. John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

View Full Bio
.
The Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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then proceeded and blessed the above named and others by the laying on of hands, Isaac Morly

11 Mar. 1786–24 June 1865. Farmer, cooper, merchant, postmaster. Born at Montague, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Thomas Morley and Editha (Edith) Marsh. Family affiliated with Presbyterian church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, before 1812. Married...

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and John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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were ordained as bishops Counsellors to Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
Joseph Smith Jr. Prophecied the day Previous that the [p. 28]
that I have not written. After he had prophecied, he laid his  hands upon Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
to the High priesthood after the holy  order of God. And the Spirit of ord fell upon Lyman

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
, and  he prophecied, concerning the coming of Christ, he said that there  were some in this congregation that should live until the Savior  shoud decend from heaven, with a Shout, with all the holy angels  with him. He said the coming of the Savior should be, like, the  Sun rising in the east, and will cover the whole earth, so  will the coming of the Son of man be. Yea, he will appear  in his brightness, and consume all before him. And the  hills will be laid low; and valies be exalted; and the crooked  be made straight; and the rough smooth. And some of  my brethren shall suffer marterdom, for the sake of the  religion of Jesus Christ. and seal the testimony of Jesus with  their blood. He saw the hevans opened, and the Son of man  sitting on the right hand of the Father. Making intercession  for his brethren. the Saints. He said that God would work a  work in these Last days that tongue cannot express, and  the mind of is not capable to conceive. The glory of the  Lord shone around.
At this conferenc[e] these were ordained to the highpriesthood  namely. Lyman White [Wight]

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
, Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
, John Murdock

15 July 1792–23 Dec. 1871. Farmer. Born at Kortright, Delaware Co., New York. Son of John Murdock Sr. and Eleanor Riggs. Joined Lutheran Dutch Church, ca. 1817, then Presbyterian Seceder Church shortly after. Moved to Orange, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ca. 1819....

View Full Bio
[,] Reynolds  Cahoon

30 Apr. 1790–29 Apr. 1861. Farmer, tanner, builder. Born at Cambridge, Washington Co., New York. Son of William Cahoon Jr. and Mehitable Hodges. Married Thirza Stiles, 11 Dec. 1810. Moved to northeastern Ohio, 1811. Located at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co.,...

View Full Bio
, Har[v]ey Whitlock

1809–after 1880. Physician. Born in Massachusetts. Married Minerva Abbott, 21 Nov. 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 1831. Ordained an elder, by June 1831. Ordained a high priest, 4 June 1831. Served mission to Jackson Co., Missouri, with David Whitmer, 1831...

View Full Bio
, and Hyram [Hyrum] Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
were ordained by Lyman  Whight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
exce[p]t S
Joseph Smith Jr. except Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
.78

According to the minutes of the meeting, Rigdon was ordained by Lyman Wight. (Minute Book 2, 3 June 1831.)  


The following by Lyman Whight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
by commandments. Parley  P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
, Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
, Isaac Morl[e]y

11 Mar. 1786–24 June 1865. Farmer, cooper, merchant, postmaster. Born at Montague, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Thomas Morley and Editha (Edith) Marsh. Family affiliated with Presbyterian church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, before 1812. Married...

View Full Bio
, Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
,  Joseph Wakefield

7 July 1792–18 Jan. 1835. Born in Dublin, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of Thomas Wakefield and Elizabeth Hardy. Married first Eunice Sawyer, 13 Dec. 1812. Moved to Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York, by 1820. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder...

View Full Bio
, Ezra Thayer

Ca. 1792–6 Sept. 1862. Farmer, gardener, builder. Born in New York. Married Elizabeth Frank. Lived at Bloomfield, Ontario Co., New York, 1820. Lived at Farmington, Ontario Co., 1830. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt and confirmed by JS, fall 1830...

View Full Bio
, Martin Harris

18 May 1783–10 July 1875. Farmer. Born at Easton, Albany Co., New York. Son of Nathan Harris and Rhoda Lapham. Moved with parents to area of Swift’s landing (later in Palmyra), Ontario Co., New York, 1793. Married first his first cousin Lucy Harris, 27 Mar...

View Full Bio
, Ezra Booth

14 Feb. 1792–before 12 Jan. 1873. Farmer, minister. Born in Newtown, Fairfield Co., Connecticut. Admitted on trial to Methodist ministry, 4 Sept. 1816, and stationed in the Ohio District in Beaver, Pike Co. Admitted into full connection and elected a deacon...

View Full Bio
 who deni[e]d the fiath Harvy Whitlock

1809–after 1880. Physician. Born in Massachusetts. Married Minerva Abbott, 21 Nov. 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 1831. Ordained an elder, by June 1831. Ordained a high priest, 4 June 1831. Served mission to Jackson Co., Missouri, with David Whitmer, 1831...

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deni[e]d the faith,79

Whitmer mistakenly listed Whitlock as being ordained by both JS and Lyman Wight. The minutes of the meeting report that Whitlock was ordained by JS. Booth was “silenced from preaching as an Elder in this Church” on 6 September 1831. The date of Whitlock’s separation from the church is not known, although it occurred before 28 September 1835, when he wrote a confessional letter to JS, stating, “I have sunk myself, (since my last separation from this boddy) in crimes of the deepest dye.” Inclusion of details such as Whitlock’s estrangement from the church confirms Whitmer was writing this history sometime later. (Minute Book 2, 3 June and 6 Sept. 1831; Harvey Whitlock to JS, Kirtland, OH, 28 Sept. 1835.)  


also Joseph Waekfield

7 July 1792–18 Jan. 1835. Born in Dublin, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of Thomas Wakefield and Elizabeth Hardy. Married first Eunice Sawyer, 13 Dec. 1812. Moved to Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York, by 1820. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder...

View Full Bio
,  Joseph Smith Sen.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

View Full Bio
Joseph Smith Jr. John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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.80

Twenty-three elders of the church, including John Whitmer, were ordained high priests on this occasion. In addition to the ordinations listed by Whitmer, Minute Book 2 lists John Corrill, Samuel Smith, Solomon Hancock, Simeon Carter, Wheeler Baldwin, and Jacob Scott, all of whom were ordained by Wight. (Minute Book 2, 3 June 1831.)  


The Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
then proceeded and blessed the above nam[e]d  and others by the laying on of hands, Isaac Morly

11 Mar. 1786–24 June 1865. Farmer, cooper, merchant, postmaster. Born at Montague, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Thomas Morley and Editha (Edith) Marsh. Family affiliated with Presbyterian church. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, before 1812. Married...

View Full Bio
and  John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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were ordained as bishops Counsellors to  Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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Joseph Smith Jr. Prophecied the day Previous that the [p. 28]
PreviousNext
“I would rather not do it” was John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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’s reponse when JS requested in 1831 that he “keep the Church history.”1

Whitmer, History, 24.  


Whitmer was no stranger to record-keeping duties; he had already assisted JS as scribe for portions of both the Book of Mormon and JS’s revision of the Bible, and about the time of his call as historian, he began scribal work on the “Book of Commandments and Revelations” (Revelation Book 1), of which he inscribed nearly all 205 pages.2

See Historical Introduction to Revelation Book 1.  


Yet the role of historian was one he was reluctant to assume, perhaps because the responsibility it carried went beyond clerical duties to writing a more comprehensive narrative. Only after asking for and receiving a revelation through JS affirming that it was God’s will that he “be appointed . . . to keep the church record and history continually” did Whitmer agree to serve as historian.3

Revelation, ca. 8 Mar. 1831–B, in Doctrine and Covenants 63:2, 1835 ed. [D&C 47:3].  


His formal appointment came a month later on 9 April 1831, when he was assigned “to keep the Church record & history by the voice of ten Elders.”4

Minute Book 2, 9 Apr. 1831.  


The 1831 commandment to serve as historian of the church was not the first revelation addressed to Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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. A revelation of June 1829 instructed him to “declare repentance unto this people, that you may bring souls unto me,” and revelations in July and September 1830 urged him to diligently study and preach and promised him divine guidance in those labors.5

Revelation, June 1829–C, in Doctrine and Covenants 40:3, 1835 ed. [D&C 15:6]; Revelation, July 1830–B, in Doctrine and Covenants 49:1, 1835 ed. [D&C 26:1]; Revelation, Sept. 1830–E, in Doctrine and Covenants 52:3, 1835 ed. [D&C 30:9–11].  


Whitmer was one of eleven to sign his name as a witness of the Book of Mormon, testifying that he saw and touched the gold plates, and he was among the first members of the Church of Christ. He was a devoted Latter-day Saint, trusted with clerical and administrative assignments. Few were as well positioned to observe and record the important events of the church. Whitmer undertook his history assignment as one who accepted JS’s revelations as the word of God, and he considered himself “commanded of the Lord and Savior Jesus Christ” to document the rise of the church.6

Whitmer, History, 1.  


He couched much of his history in biblical language, perhaps envisioning a fifth gospel on the pattern of the New Testament, a latter-day “Book of John”—his original title for the work before appending his last name—chronicling the growth of a divine kingdom.
Documents from the early 1830s show that Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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remained uncertain about his role as historian and that JS continually placed responsibility for keeping the official church history squarely on Whitmer’s shoulders. Eight months after the revelation commanding Whitmer to keep a history, a November 1831 revelation directed Whitmer to “continue in writing and making a history of all the important things which he shall observe and know, concerning my church” and to travel “from place to place, and from church to church, that he may the more easily obtain knowledge.”7

Revelation, 11 Nov. 1831–A, in Doctrine and Covenants 28:1–2, 1835 ed. [D&C 69:3, 7].  


The next year JS wrote a letter telling Whitmer, “I exhort Bro John also to remember the commandment to him to keep a history of the church & the gathering and be sure to shew him self approoved whereunto he hath been called.”8

JS, Hiram, OH, to William W. Phelps, [Independence, MO], 31 July 1832, copy, JS Collection, CHL.  


In July 1833 Whitmer asked Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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to request further instructions on record keeping, and a detailed response was sent the following January.9

John Whitmer, Independence, MO, to JS and Oliver Cowdery, Kirtland Mills, OH, 29 July 1833, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 52–55; Oliver Cowdery, Kirtland, OH, to John Whitmer, Missouri, 1 Jan. 1834, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 14–17.  


Again in a September 1835 blessing, JS expressed concern for Whitmer’s history, promising (and reminding) the historian that he “shall make a choice record of Israel.”10

JS to John Whitmer, Blessing, 22 Sept. 1835, in Patriarchal Blessings, 1:14.  


Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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worked on his history throughout the 1830s and into the 1840s as noteworthy events developed and as time allowed. On 12 June 1831, three months after the revelation appointing him to keep the church history, Whitmer began writing or at least making notes for a history.11

Whitmer, History, 1, 25.  


Summer 1831 provided ample opportunity to start the work: while two dozen elders traveled to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, Whitmer remained in Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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, providing him something of a sabbatical from other church duties. Whitmer’s occasional use of the present tense and disclosure of composition dates in early chapters show that he recorded some of his history contemporaneous to the events described. For example, in chapter 10 he wrote concerning conditions in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, Missouri, that “Zion is prospering at presnt”—an observation he would not have made after opposition against the church grew increasingly intense in 1833. He also noted the church population in Missouri around March 1832 (“there are at this time 402, disciples living in this land Zion”) and on the next page noted, “Decmbr 1, 1832, there are now 538 individuals in this land b[e]longing to th[e] church.”12

Whitmer, History, 38, 39.  


Although language in the first chapters of the history shows that Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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drafted some of his narrative in the early 1830s, textual evidence indicates that the extant “Book of John Whitmer” was created no earlier than 1835 and in fact probably dates from 1838. Most of the revelations Whitmer copied into or cited in the first eight chapters (including the first copied revelation, on page 2 of his manuscript) came from the first edition of the Doctrine and Covenants, so the existing Whitmer history could not have been written earlier than 1835. A note at the end of page 85 dates the completion of chapter 19 in March 1838, and the entire history to that point may have been copied at the same time. (The final three chapters following chapter 19 were written after Whitmer’s 1838 excommunication, as explained later.) Chapter 12 opens with the inscription “May 10, 1838,” which Whitmer apparently intended as “May 10, 1834.” It is implausible that Whitmer mistakenly wrote a year that lay in the future; more likely, he inadvertently wrote the current year when he was copying the text, suggesting he was copying chapter 12 in 1838.13

Historical evidence also suggests that Whitmer made the extant copy of the entire history in 1838. Following Whitmer’s excommunication in March 1838, church leaders made a concerted effort to obtain the records in his possession. This effort was partially successful: Whitmer apparently turned over a copied list of names of members who had resided in Missouri and possibly made available some minutes he had kept. Whitmer may have copied his history in order to turn it over to church leadership but then changed his mind and retained the volume. (“Names of the Members of the Church in Missouri. Then Situated Most in Caldwell County,” 2–14; Ebenezer Robinson, “Items of Personal History of the Editor,” The Return, Sept. 1889, 133; compare items copied in Minute Book 2.)  


It is possible that the first eleven chapters of the history were copied in 1835 or 1836, but there is no explicit evidence that any of the present history was created before 1838.14

It is not known how extensively Whitmer revised earlier drafts when creating the extant “Book of John Whitmer,” although, as noted, he retained some of his present-tense language from the early 1830s. Some passages suggest that Whitmer was writing later, as when he noted that some who were ordained to the high priesthood at a June 1831 church conference subsequently “deni[e]d the faith.” Also, when describing conditions in Jackson County, Missouri, in March 1832, he alluded to the expulsion that occurred the following year. (See Whitmer, History, 23, 28, 38.)  


In his responsibility as historian, Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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viewed himself as resuming the church record where Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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left off. Whitmer opened his history noting, “I shall proceed to continue this record,” and he explained in chapter 6, “Oliver Cowdery has written the commencement of the church history commencing at the time of the finding of the plates, up to June 12, 1831. from this date I have written the things that I have written.” The revelation assigning Whitmer as historian supported his view that he was replacing Cowdery: “It shall be appointed unto him to keep the church record and history continually, for Oliver Cowdery I have appointed to another office.”15

Revelation, ca. 8 Mar. 1831–B, in Doctrine and Covenants 63:2, 1835 ed. [D&C 47:3].  


There is no other document from the time, however, indicating that Cowdery’s original record-keeping assignment included narrative history, and Whitmer’s initial focus as Cowdery’s replacement was copying revelations and apparently drafting notes and collecting other records. Whitmer may have known or assumed that Cowdery wrote a unified narrative covering the period from JS’s discovery of the gold plates to summer 1831, but no such document is extant.
John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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’s reference to 12 June 1831 as Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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’s stopping point corresponds to his own starting date (which he recorded on the first page of his history) but appears unrelated to an ending date for records kept by Cowdery. The March 1831 revelation officially released Cowdery from his duties, and his term of service effectively terminated even earlier, when he was called in September 1830 to leave the main body of the church and proselytize among Indians on the western frontier of the United States

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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(the account of which opens Whitmer’s history). Cowdery’s major historical account was written in 1834–1835 and published in the periodical Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate. That history, composed as a series of letters to William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, focused on the period from 1823 until shortly before JS retrieved the Book of Mormon plates in 1827.16

The published letters were copied into JS’s 1834–1836 history.  


As noted above, Whitmer’s history cited the 1835 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants, meaning that the extant version of chapter 6 was written no earlier than 1835. Therefore, when Whitmer referred to Cowdery’s historical writings, beginning “at the time of the finding of the plates,” he may have been referring in part to Cowdery’s Messenger and Advocate letters.
Early in his work, Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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settled upon a format that combined narrative history with significant revelations, letters, petitions, and other documents. He copied many of these documents in full and noted that others should be inserted. In the first eight chapters, Whitmer documented the church’s rise in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, by incorporating sixteen revelations conveyed by JS between 7 December 1830 and 15 June 1831.17

The revelations dating from this time period but not included by Whitmer in his history are as follows: Revelation, 9 Dec. 1830, in Doctrine and Covenants 57, 1835 ed. [D&C 36]; Revelation, 5 Jan. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 59, 1835 ed. [D&C 39]; Revelation, 6 Jan. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 60, 1835 ed. [D&C 40]; Revelation, 15 May 1831, in Revelation Book 1, p. 85; Revelation, 20 May 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 23, 1835 ed. [D&C 51]; Revelation, 8 June 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 66, 1835 ed. [D&C 53]; and Revelation, 14 June 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 68, 1835 ed. [D&C 55]. These seven revelations were directed to individuals and not to the church as a whole.  


Letters from Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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and Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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form part of chapter 9, which describes the establishment of the city of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

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in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, Missouri, in summer 1831. Beginning with chapter 10, Whitmer’s history turns to letters, military communications, and petitions relevant to the conflicts that arose between the Latter-day Saints and neighboring Missourians starting in 1832 and that culminated with the expulsion of the Saints from Jackson County in November 1833. Whitmer documented in particular the Mormons’ unsuccessful efforts to obtain government assistance to be restored to their Jackson County properties, through the courts, through appeals to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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governor Daniel Dunklin

14 Jan. 1790–25 July 1844. Farmer, tavern owner, businessman, investor, lawyer, politician. Born near Greenville, Greenville District, South Carolina. Son of Joseph Dunklin Jr. and Sarah Margaret Sullivan. Moved to what became Caldwell Co., Kentucky, 1806...

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, and through a petition to United States

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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president Andrew Jackson. Chapters 15–18 return to events in Kirtland, where Whitmer journeyed in 1835 to participate in the activities leading up to the dedication of the House of the Lord

JS revelation of Jan. 1831 directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” JS Revelation of Dec. 1832 directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS Revelation of 1 June 1833 chastened Saints...

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; the last document Whitmer selected to be inserted in the history is the Messenger and Advocate account of the dedication in March 1836. Chapter 19 documents the subsequent relocation of the Missouri Saints from Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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to what became Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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and briefly mentions problems at Kirtland and at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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. Whitmer was accused of financial wrongdoing and excommunicated on 10 March 1838. He recorded the excommunication in chapter 19 of his history and then wrote, “Therefore I close the history of the church of Latter Day Saints, hoping that . . . I find favor in the eyes of God.” Later events would compel him to return to his history.
After his estrangement from the church, Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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refused to relinquish the manuscript for printing. Two months after Whitmer’s excommunication, JS and Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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wrote him:
We were desireous of honouring you by giving publicity to your notes on the history of the Church of Latter day Saints, after such corrections as we thaught would be necessary; knowing your incompetency as a historian, and that your writings coming from your pen, could not be put to the press, without our correcting them, or elce the Church must suffer reproach; Indeed Sir, we never supposed you capable of writing a history; but were willing to let it come out under your name notwithstanding it would realy not be yours but ours. We are still willing to honour you, if you can be made to know your own interest and give up your notes, so that they can be corrected, and made fit for the press. But if not, we have all the materials for another, which we shall commence this week to write[.]18

JS and Sidney Rigdon, Far West, MO, to John Whitmer, 9 Apr. 1838. Because Whitmer copied or prepared the extant “Book of John Whitmer” from an earlier draft or notes, it is unknown whether JS and Rigdon meant for Whitmer to turn over the text now known as the “Book of John Whitmer” or whether they hoped to obtain earlier notes or sources Whitmer used for his history.  


There is no record of Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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responding to the condescending letter, and church leaders soon made other arrangements. John Corrill

17 Sept. 1794–26 Sept. 1842. Surveyor, politician, author. Born at Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Married Margaret Lyndiff, ca. 1830. Lived at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 10 Jan. 1831, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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and Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

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had already been assigned as historians, and within three weeks of writing to Whitmer, JS himself began to prepare a new history with the assistance of Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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and scribe George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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.19

Minute Book 2, 6 Apr. 1838; JS, Journal, 27 Apr. 1838.  


Following his excommunication, Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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was forced to move in June 1838 from the Mormon settlement of Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, Missouri. He resettled in nearby Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

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, but he returned to Far West after the main body of Saints left for Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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in 1839. At some point following his separation from the church, Whitmer struck from chapter 19 not only his contrite conclusion but also his own name as one of the excommunicated Saints. He then added three chapters that were, in the words of later assistant church historian Andrew Jenson, “in altogether a different spirit.”20

Whitmer, “The Book of John Whitmer,” Andrew Jenson typescript, ca. Mar. 1894, [70].  


Whitmer accused JS and other leaders of pride, deceit, and despotism, repeating the most sensational reports coming out of the new Mormon settlement in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois.
In the 1840s, as Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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worked in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, to compile the history of JS and the church, Phelps apparently inquired after the history in Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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’s possession. In January 1844, Whitmer wrote to Phelps, offering to sell his history “at a fair price.” Whitmer told Phelps that Latter-day Saint land in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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was “going to distruction”; he proposed trading his history “for property &c. provided we can agree as to price.” Whitmer reported that the “church history,” which may have been the volume that contained the “Book of John Whitmer,” was “at my controll but not in my Possession.”21

John Whitmer, Far West, MO, to William W. Phelps, Nauvoo, IL, 8 Jan. 1844, JS, Office Papers, CHL.  


Willard Richards responded to this letter, declining the offer from Whitmer and explaining that church historians had “already compiled about 800 pages of church history . . . which covers all the ground of which you took notes, therefore anything which you have in the shape of church history would be of little or no consequence to the church at large.”22

Willard Richards, Nauvoo, IL, to John Whitmer, Far West, MO, 23 Feb. 1844, copy, Willard Richards, Papers, CHL.  


Continuing to write after the death of JS, Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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at first affirmed James J. Strang

21 Mar. 1813–ca. 26 June 1856. Teacher, lawyer, newspaper publisher, postmaster. Born in Scipio, Cayuga Co., New York. Son of Clement Strang and Abigail James. Moved to Hanover, Chautauque Co., New York, 1816. Moved to Ellington, Chautauque Co., 1836. Married...

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as the rightful leader of the Saints, but he later canceled this passage. In September 1847, William E. McLellin

18 Jan. 1806–14 Mar. 1883. Schoolteacher, physician, publisher. Born at Smith Co., Tennessee. Son of Charles McLellin and Sarah (a Cherokee Indian). Married first Cynthia Ann, 30 July 1829. Wife died, by summer 1831. Baptized into LDS church by Hyrum Smith...

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persuaded John and David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

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and Hiram Page

1800–12 Aug. 1852. Physician, farmer. Born in Vermont. Married Catherine Whitmer, 10 Nov. 1825, in Seneca Co., New York. One of the Eight Witnesses of the Book of Mormon, June 1829. Baptized into LDS church by Oliver Cowdery, 11 Apr. 1830, at Seneca Lake,...

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to accept ordination in a reformed Church of Christ, which they soon repudiated.23

[William E. McLellin], “Our Tour West in 1847,” Ensign of Liberty, Aug. 1849, 99–105; [Ebenezer Robinson], “Elder David Whitmer,” The Return, Jan. 1889, 10; see also Porter, “Odyssey of William Earl McLellin,” 341–346.  


It was during this time that John Whitmer wrote the end of his history, putting forward the successorship claims of his brother David. As the main body of the Saints moved to the Great Basin, Whitmer remained in Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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and at no point did he reestablish affiliation with those who went west. He did, however, continue to affirm his witness of the gold plates.24

Near the end of his life, Whitmer wrote regarding the printed testimony of the Eight Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, “It is the Same as it was from the beginning, and it is true. . . . I have never denied my testimony as to the Book of Mormon, under any circumstances whatever.” (Joseph R. Lambert, Lamoni, IA, to E. L. Kelley, 29 Jan. 1884, CCLA.)  


A prosperous farmer until his death on 11 July 1878, he left an estate of 625 acres as well as livestock and farm equipment.25

“Executor’s or Administrator’s Inventory, Certificate, and Affidavit,” Estate of John Whitmer, 11 Oct. 1878, photocopy, private possession; Caldwell Co., MO, Probate Court, Inventories, Appraisements, Sale Bills, vol. C, pp. 91–92, microfilm 955,841; Caldwell Co., MO, Probate Court, Records, vol. D, pp. 35–38, microfilm 955,386, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.  


The “Book of John Whitmer” illuminates many important concerns of the early church, including property issues, church discipline, the millenarian beliefs of the Latter-day Saints and their fervor in constructing Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

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or the “New Jerusalem,” the treatment of dissidents, and the establishment of a priesthood leadership hierarchy. It also reports on the construction and significance of the temple

JS revelation of Jan. 1831 directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” JS Revelation of Dec. 1832 directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS Revelation of 1 June 1833 chastened Saints...

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at Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, the conflicts the Saints had with their neighbors in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, their subsequent attempts to secure redress, and aspects of succession following JS’s death. Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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’s work is particularly significant for the revelations, petitions, and letters that form a large part of his history.

Facts