27467

Journal, 1835–1836

the workers of iniquity, while the saints will be gathered out from among them and stand in holy places ready to meet the bridegroom when he comes.—
I feel disposed to speak a few words more to you my brethren concerning the endowment

The terms endow, endowed, and endowment—as well as endued and enduement—were used to describe the bestowal of spiritual blessings upon the Latter-day Saints. In common usage, these terms meant essentially the same thing: to clothe, to put on, to furnish, ...

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, all who are prepared and are sufficiently pure to abide the presence of the Saviour will see him in the solem assembly

Generally, a special church meeting, such as the meeting of the School of the Prophets on 23 January 1833 and the dedication of the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio, on 27 March 1836. In particular, it referred to the meeting held in the House of the Lord...

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.
The brethren expressed their gratifycation for the instruction I had given them, we then closed by prayer,— I then returned home and retired to rest

13 November 1835 • Friday

Friday 13th attended school

A term occasionally used to refer to a Protestant seminary; specifically used by JS to refer to a school to prepare elders of the church for their ministry. A December 1832 revelation directed JS and the elders of the church in Kirtland, Ohio, to establish...

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during school hours, returned home after School; Mr Messenger [George Messinger Jr.] of Bainbridge

Located 110 miles southwest of Albany, New York. Hilly land cut by Susquehanna River. Organized as Jericho, 1791, as part of tract of land given by New York to “Vermont sufferers” who lost land titles after border dispute between New York and Vermont. Name...

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Chenango Co.N. Y. came in to make some enquiry about Hezekiah Peck

19 Jan. 1782–25 Aug. 1850. Millwright. Born at Guilford, Cumberland Co., New York (later in Windham Co., Vermont). Son of Joseph Peck and Elizabeth Read. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, by 1812. Married Martha Long, by 1812. Baptized...

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’s family he is a Universalian minister we entered into conversation upon religious subjects, we went to President [Sidney] Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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’s and spent the evening in conversation, we preachd the gospel to him, and bore testimony to him of what we had seen and heard, he attempted to raise some objections but, the force of truth bore him down, and he was silent, although unbelieving; returned home and retired to rest

14 November 1835 • Saturday

Saturday morning 14th Thus came the word of the Lord unto me saying:
verily thus saith the Lord unto my servant Joseph concerning my servant Warren [Parrish]

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, behold [p. 35]
the workers of iniquity,102

See Revelation, 27 Feb. 1833, in Doctrine and Covenants 80:3, 1835 ed. [D&C 89:21].  


while the saints will  be gathered out from among them and  stand in holy places103

See, for example, Matthew 24:15; and Revelation, 16 and 17 Dec. 1833, in Doctrine and Covenants 97:5, 1835 ed. [D&C 101:22].  


ready to meet the  bridegroom when he comes.—104

See, for example, Matthew 25:1–13; and Revelation, Oct. 1830–B, in Doctrine and Covenants 55:3, 1835 ed. [D&C 33:17].  


I feel disposed to speak a few words more  to you my brethren concerning the endowm ent

The terms endow, endowed, and endowment—as well as endued and enduement—were used to describe the bestowal of spiritual blessings upon the Latter-day Saints. In common usage, these terms meant essentially the same thing: to clothe, to put on, to furnish, ...

View Glossary
, all who are prepared and are suff iciently pure to abide the presence of the Savi our will see him in the solem assembly

Generally, a special church meeting, such as the meeting of the School of the Prophets on 23 January 1833 and the dedication of the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio, on 27 March 1836. In particular, it referred to the meeting held in the House of the Lord...

View Glossary
.105

See Revelation, 2 Nov. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 25:3, 1835 ed. [D&C 67:10]; and Matthew 5:8.  


The brethren expressed their gratifycation  for the instruction I had given them, we then  closed by prayer,— I then returned home  and retired to rest

13 November 1835 • Friday

Friday 13th attended school

A term occasionally used to refer to a Protestant seminary; specifically used by JS to refer to a school to prepare elders of the church for their ministry. A December 1832 revelation directed JS and the elders of the church in Kirtland, Ohio, to establish...

View Glossary
 during school hours, returned home after  School; Mr Messenger [George Messinger Jr.] of Bainbridge

Located 110 miles southwest of Albany, New York. Hilly land cut by Susquehanna River. Organized as Jericho, 1791, as part of tract of land given by New York to “Vermont sufferers” who lost land titles after border dispute between New York and Vermont. Name...

More Info
Chenango  Co.N. Y. came in to make some enquiry  about H[ezekiah] Peck

19 Jan. 1782–25 Aug. 1850. Millwright. Born at Guilford, Cumberland Co., New York (later in Windham Co., Vermont). Son of Joseph Peck and Elizabeth Read. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge), Chenango Co., New York, by 1812. Married Martha Long, by 1812. Baptized...

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’s family he is a Universalian  minister106

Messinger was a preacher for the First Universalist Society of Smithville Flats, Chenango County, New York. The Peck family, converts from Chenango County, New York, were living at this time in Clay County, Missouri, where Hezekiah was a Latter-day Saint priest. (James H. Smith, History of Chenango and Madison Counties, 303–304; Chenango Co., NY, Deed Records, 1798–1905, vol. TT, pp. 225–226, 20 Mar. 1833, microfilm 818,137, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; George Messinger Jr., South Bainbridge, NY, to S. Presson Landers, Prompton, PA, 1 Aug. 1837, Andover-Harvard Theological Library, Cambridge, MA; Whitmer, History, 80–81.)  


we entered into conversation upon  religious subjects, we went to President [Sidney]  Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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’s and spent the evening in convers ation, we preachd the gospel to him, and bore  testimony to him of what we had seen and  heard, he attempted to raise some obje ctions but, the force of truth bore him  down, and he was silent, although un believing; returned home and retired  to rest

14 November 1835 • Saturday

Saturday morning 14th  Thus came the word of the Lord unto  me saying:
verily thus saith the the  Lord unto my servant Joseph  concerning my servant Warren [Parrish]

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, behold [p. 35]
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JS, “Sketch Book for the use of Joseph Smith, jr.,” Journal, Sept. 1835–Apr. 1836; handwriting of Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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, an unidentified scribe, Sylvester Smith

25 Mar. 1806–22 Feb. 1880. Farmer, carpenter, lawyer, realtor. Born at Tyringham, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Chileab Smith and Nancy Marshall. Moved to Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, ca. 1815. Married Elizabeth Frank, 27 Dec. 1827, likely in Chautauque...

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, Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, Warren Cowdery

17 Oct. 1788–23 Feb. 1851. Physician, druggist, farmer, editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Married Patience Simonds, 22 Sept. 1814, in Pawlet, Rutland Co. Moved to Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., New York, 1816...

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, JS, and Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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; 195 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
The text block consists of 114 leaves—including single flyleaves and pastedowns in the front and back—measuring 12¼ x 8 inches (31 x 20 cm). The 110 interior leaves are ledger paper with thirty-four lines in faint—and now faded—black ink that has turned brown. There are nine gatherings of various sizes—each about a dozen leaves per gathering. The text block is sewn all along over cloth tapes. The front and back covers of the journal are pasteboard. The ledger has a tight-back case binding with a brown calfskin quarter-leather binding. The outside covers are adorned in shell marbled paper, with dark green body and veins of light green. The bound volume measures 12⅜ x 8¼ inches (31 x 21 cm) and is 13/16 inches (2 cm) thick. One cover of the book is labeled “Repentence.” in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains eight lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to Repentince”. The spine has “No 8” inscribed upside up when the book is standing upright for this side. When the volume is turned upside down and flipped front to back, the other cover is titled “Sabbath Day” with “No 9” written beneath in black ink. The first page of ledger paper under that cover contains two lines of references to the book of Genesis under the heading “Scriptures relating to the Sabbath day”. Thus the book was used to simultaneously house two volumes of topical notes on biblical passages. This book was apparently part of a larger series that included at least two other extant volumes—one bearing “Faith” and “10” on the cover, and the other bearing “Second Comeing of Christ” and “No 3” on one cover and “Gift of the Holy Ghost” on the other cover.1

“Grammar & Aphabet of the Egyptian Language,” Kirtland Egyptian Papers, ca. 1835–1836, CHL; Kirtland Elders Quorum, “Record”.  


In late 1835, JS and scribes began using the book to record his journal for 1835–1836, which begins on the recto of the second leaf of ledger paper. Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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added the title “Sketch Book” to the cover, beneath “Repentence.”.
The entire journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown. Pages 25, 51, 77, 103, 129, and 154 bear the marks of adhesive wafers that were probably used to attach manuscripts until they were copied into the journal. The journal was used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, in 1843 as a major source in composing JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. At this time, redactions were made in ink and in graphite pencil, and use marks were made in graphite. Also, apparently in Nauvoo, the cover of the journal side of the book was marked with a “D” and then with a larger, stylized “D”. At some point a white paper spine label was added with “1835–6 <Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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> JOURNAL” hand printed or stenciled in black ink that later turned brown. The insertion “Kirtland” is written in graphite. Also, in the “Repentence” side of the volume, the rectos of the third through eighth leaves of ledger paper are numbered on the upper right-hand corners as 195, 197, 199, 201, 203, and 205—all written in graphite and apparently redactions. Except with regard to the title “Sketch Book”, none of the authors of the inscriptions mentioned previously have been identified. This volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.2

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [1], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


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