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Revelation, 29 August 1832 [D&C 99]

Hiram

Area settled by immigrants from Pennsylvania and New England, ca. 1802. Located in northeastern Ohio about twenty-five miles southeast of Kirtland. Population in 1830 about 500. Population in 1840 about 1,100. JS lived in township at home of John and Alice...

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Portage County Ohio August 29th. 18321

This heading may not have been part of the original inscription; Frederick G. Williams may have added it at the time he copied the revelation into Revelation Book 2.  


Behold thus saith the Lord unto you my servant John Murdock

15 July 1792–23 Dec. 1871. Farmer. Born at Kortright, Delaware Co., New York. Son of John Murdock Sr. and Eleanor Riggs. Joined Lutheran Dutch Church, ca. 1817, then Presbyterian Seceder Church shortly after. Moved to Orange, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ca. 1819....

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2

The index in Revelation Book 2 specifies that the revelation was for John Murdock. (Revelation Book 2, Index, [1].)  


thou art called to go unto the eastern countries3

“Eastern countries” denoted long-settled areas in eastern states such as New York. Following this revelation, Murdock preached mainly in Geauga County, Ohio, for several months before traveling to New York (or what he termed “the eastern country”) in April 1833. (Murdock, Journal, Feb.–Mar. 1832.)  


from house to house and from Village to Village and from City to City4

A March 1832 revelation appointing Jared Carter to serve a mission used similar language: “my Servant Jerad should go again into the eastern countries from place, to place, and from City, City.” (Revelation, 12 Mar. 1832 [D&C 79:1]; see also Revelation, 25 Jan. 1832–A [D&C 75:18].)  


to proclaim mine everlasting Gospel unto the in habitants thereof in the midst of persicution and wickedness and whoso receiveth you receiveth me5

See John 13:20; and Matthew 10:40.  


and you shall have power to declare my word in the demonstration of my holy Spirit and whoso receiveth you [p. 19]
Hiram

Area settled by immigrants from Pennsylvania and New England, ca. 1802. Located in northeastern Ohio about twenty-five miles southeast of Kirtland. Population in 1830 about 500. Population in 1840 about 1,100. JS lived in township at home of John and Alice...

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Portage County Ohio August 29th. 18321

This heading may not have been part of the original inscription; Frederick G. Williams may have added it at the time he copied the revelation into Revelation Book 2.  


Behold thus saith the Lord unto you my  servant John [Murdock]

15 July 1792–23 Dec. 1871. Farmer. Born at Kortright, Delaware Co., New York. Son of John Murdock Sr. and Eleanor Riggs. Joined Lutheran Dutch Church, ca. 1817, then Presbyterian Seceder Church shortly after. Moved to Orange, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ca. 1819....

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2

The index in Revelation Book 2 specifies that the revelation was for John Murdock. (Revelation Book 2, Index, [1].)  


thou art called to go unto  the eastern countries3

“Eastern countries” denoted long-settled areas in eastern states such as New York. Following this revelation, Murdock preached mainly in Geauga County, Ohio, for several months before traveling to New York (or what he termed “the eastern country”) in April 1833. (Murdock, Journal, Feb.–Mar. 1832.)  


from house to house and  from Village to Village and from City to City4

A March 1832 revelation appointing Jared Carter to serve a mission used similar language: “my Servant Jerad should go again into the eastern countries from place, to place, and from City, City.” (Revelation, 12 Mar. 1832 [D&C 79:1]; see also Revelation, 25 Jan. 1832–A [D&C 75:18].)  


 to proclaim mine everlasting Gospel unto  the in habitants thereof in the midst of  persicution and wickedness and whos[o] receiveth  you receiveth me5

See John 13:20; and Matthew 10:40.  


and you shall have power  to declare my word in the demonstration  of my holy Spirit and whoso receiveth you [p. 19]
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On 29 August 1832, JS dictated this revelation calling John Murdock

15 July 1792–23 Dec. 1871. Farmer. Born at Kortright, Delaware Co., New York. Son of John Murdock Sr. and Eleanor Riggs. Joined Lutheran Dutch Church, ca. 1817, then Presbyterian Seceder Church shortly after. Moved to Orange, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ca. 1819....

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on a preaching mission to the “eastern countries.” Following his conversion and baptism

An ordinance in which an individual is immersed in water for the remission of sins. The Book of Mormon explained that those with necessary authority were to baptize individuals who had repented of their sins. Baptized individuals also received the gift of...

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in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, on 30 November 1830, Murdock spent much time as a traveling missionary, baptizing around seventy people in four months in Orange

Located about five miles south of Kirtland Township. Area settled, 1815. Organized 1820. Population in 1830 about 300. Population in 1838 about 800. Sixty-five Latter-day Saints lived in township, by Nov. 1830. Joseph and Julia Murdock, twins adopted by JS...

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, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, and Warrensville, Ohio. In early 1831, Murdock decided to devote himself “full time to the ministry” and moved his family in with another family so that he could do so.1

Murdock, Journal, 5 Nov. 1830.  


In June 1831, a revelation instructed him to go to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, “preaching the word by the way.”2

Revelation, 6 June 1831 [D&C 52:8–9].  


Murdock followed this instruction and departed for Missouri, despite the recent death of his wife, Julia Clapp Murdock, during childbirth, which left him with five children under the age of seven, including newborn twins. Before leaving, he arranged for several individuals to watch over his older children; JS and Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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adopted the twins. For the rest of 1831 and the first half of 1832, Murdock preached in Michigan Territory

Organized as territory, 1805, with Detroit as capital. De facto state government organized within territory, 1836, although not formally recognized as state by federal government until 1837. Lansing became new state capital, 1847. Population in 1810 about...

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, Indiana

First settled by French at Vincennes, early 1700s. Acquired by England in French and Indian War, 1763. U.S. took possession of area following American Revolution, 1783. Area became part of Northwest Territory, 1787. Partitioned off of Northwest Territory ...

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, Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, and Ohio, among other places. When he returned to Hiram

Area settled by immigrants from Pennsylvania and New England, ca. 1802. Located in northeastern Ohio about twenty-five miles southeast of Kirtland. Population in 1830 about 500. Population in 1840 about 1,100. JS lived in township at home of John and Alice...

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, Ohio, in June 1832, suffering from the effects of a months-long bout with ague, he found that one of the twins had died in March.3

Joseph Murdock Smith was sick with measles the night of 24–25 March 1832 when a mob broke into the home of John and Alice (Elsa) Jacobs Johnson, took JS by force, and left an outside door open. According to a later JS history, “During the mob one of the twins received a severe cold, and continued to grow worse.” Joseph Murdock Smith died a few days later. (JS History, vol. A-1, 205–209; see also Joseph Smith III, “Last Testimony of Sister Emma,” Saints’ Herald, 1 Oct. 1879, 289.)  


In addition, those with whom he had left his three older children demanded payment for their help.
Despite these challenging circumstances, Murdock

15 July 1792–23 Dec. 1871. Farmer. Born at Kortright, Delaware Co., New York. Son of John Murdock Sr. and Eleanor Riggs. Joined Lutheran Dutch Church, ca. 1817, then Presbyterian Seceder Church shortly after. Moved to Orange, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ca. 1819....

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recorded in his journal that he “continued with the church in Cuyahoga & Geauga

Located in northeastern Ohio, south of Lake Erie. Rivers in area include Grand, Chagrin, and Cuyahoga. Settled mostly by New Englanders, beginning 1798. Formed from Trumbull Co., 1 Mar. 1806. Chardon established as county seat, 1808. Population in 1830 about...

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Co’s confirming & strengthning the church & regaining my health.”4

Murdock, Journal, May–Sept. 1832.  


This 29 August 1832 revelation instructed him to resume his preaching, this time in the eastern United States

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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. The revelation also told him to continue preaching until his death, unless he desired to go to Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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“after a few years.” Perhaps because of the problems Murdock experienced with his children’s caretakers, the revelation told him not to leave until he made arrangements to send his children to Bishop

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. JS appointed Edward Partridge as the first bishop in February 1831. Following this appointment, Partridge functioned as the local leader of the church in Missouri. Later revelations described a bishop’s duties as receiving...

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Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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in Zion. This revelation’s call for Murdock to continue as a missionary until his death, notwithstanding his family responsibilities, was an unusual sacrifice apparently not expected of other early church members and may have resulted from his earlier determination to devote himself “full time to the ministry.”5

For example, a January 1832 revelation appointing several individuals to preach declared that “every man who is obliged to provide for his own family let him provide and he shall in no wise loose his crown,” suggesting that those who could not preach because of familial responsibilities were excused from extensive service. (Revelation, 25 Jan. 1832–B [D&C 75:28].)  


Upon receiving these instructions, Murdock

15 July 1792–23 Dec. 1871. Farmer. Born at Kortright, Delaware Co., New York. Son of John Murdock Sr. and Eleanor Riggs. Joined Lutheran Dutch Church, ca. 1817, then Presbyterian Seceder Church shortly after. Moved to Orange, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ca. 1819....

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“provided for” his children and “sent them up to the Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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in Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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.”6

Murdock, Journal, 24 Sept. 1832.  


Murdock paid Caleb Baldwin

2 Sept. 1791–11 June 1849. Born in Nobletown (later Hillsdale), Orange Co., New York. Son of Philemon Baldwin and Esther. Served in War of 1812 in Ohio militia. Married Nancy Kingsbury, 7 Dec. 1814, in Cuyahoga Co., Ohio. Moved to Warrensville (later in University...

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to take his three oldest children—Orrice, John, and Phebe—to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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. Once there, Orrice lived with George

16 May 1801–26 Nov. 1873. Sheriff, farmer, teacher. Born in Hartford, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Paul Pitkin and Abigail Lothrop. Moved to Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, by 1820. Sheriff of Portage Co. Married first Amanda Egglestone, 8 Feb. 1829, in Portage...

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and Amanda Egglestone Pitkin, John with Morris and Laura Clark Phelps, and Phebe with Sidney

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

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and Elizabeth Van Benthusen Gilbert.7

Murdock, Autobiography and Journal, 1–2.  


Julia

30 Apr. 1831–12 Sept. 1880. Born in Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio. Daughter of John Murdock and Julia Clapp. After death of mother, adopted by JS and Emma Smith at age of nine days. Lived in Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co....

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, the surviving twin, remained in the care of JS and Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
in Hiram

Area settled by immigrants from Pennsylvania and New England, ca. 1802. Located in northeastern Ohio about twenty-five miles southeast of Kirtland. Population in 1830 about 500. Population in 1840 about 1,100. JS lived in township at home of John and Alice...

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. Murdock then left on his mission on 24 September 1832.8

Murdock, Journal, 24 Sept. 1832.  


The original manuscript of the revelation, which is not extant, was apparently inscribed by Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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. The copy he made in Revelation Book 2 bears the notation “by Joseph the seer

The Book of Mormon identified a seer as a “revelator, and a prophet also,” specifying, however, that a seer was “greater than a prophet.” A seer could “know of things which has past, and also of things which is to come.” The work of a seer included translation...

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and writen by— F.G. Williams Scribe.”9

Williams accompanied JS on much of his business in the week leading up to this revelation. On 23 August 1832, for example, JS and Williams ordained Amasa Lyman and Zerubbabel Snow as elders. On 27 and 28 August, Williams joined JS on a journey to Shalersville Township, Ohio, located directly southwest of Hiram. (“Amasa Lyman’s History,” Deseret News, 8 Sept. 1858, 117; see JS and Frederick G. Williams, Kirtland, OH, to John Smith, [Eugene, IN], 2 July 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 50–51.)  


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